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UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA

i Fililí IUH Bill fluí •!(•• "

5406326873

ESUIMEtU-

(2)

DONA( .

(3)

FABLES

BY JOHN GAY,

TU w n n u AHE iUIlF.II

FABLES

BY EDWARD MOORE.

Les libraires sont prevenns que cette edition stereo- lypfj cTaprés Jtf jkrocécl*; cié l-'mimi DIDOT, en T vol., NE se vend a Paris que

Chez P. DIDOT I aifié, irnprimeur, anx galeries dn

Et oha lirmin DIDOT, Iibraire, rue de

% . , 4 , * i f 1 . r "P I \

itT íín 9 • • i a5

elin, 4 5o

(4)

FABLES

BY JOHN GAY,

IN TWO PARTS;

TU VVB1C1I 1 B I . AU1JKD

FABLES

BY EDWARD MOORE.

S T E R E O T Y P E I'.DITION.

P

R

INTED BY P. DIDOT, THE •

I»I THF M I . I I I OP ARTS AND SCIENCES.

EIGHTH YEAK. ( l 8 o O . )

(5)

INTRODUCTION

TO THE

FABLES.

P A R T T H E F I R S T .

THE SHEPHERD AND THE PHILOSOPHER.

K EMOTF. from cities liv'd a swain, U

N

RCX'D with all the cares ofgain ; His head was silver'd o'er with.i g e , And long experience made btm « g e ;

I n M i n i i i i i : i ' s h e a t , a u d m í i l r r s . . ¡ I d .

l l i f>-il ] i ú l l r . i t , p u d | > i ' i i i i ' ( l t l n - f u l i l :

His hours in cheerful labourf lew, Nor envy nor ambition knew :

His WISDOM and his honest fame Through all the country rais'd his name.

A ili'i-ji |.iliílo.so|>iirr ( wli'in! rules

Of moral life were drawn from schools)

The she

p

herd's homely cottage songht, And thus explor'd his reach of thought:

Whenceis thy learning? Hath thy toil

t> i:r bunki cun&uuitl llif ratdniglitoil?

(6)

INTRODUCTION.

H

a

stthou old Greece and Rome survey 'd, And the vast sense of Plnt» wrigh'd?

Hath Socrates thysoul refin'd, And h AS t thou fathom'd Tully's mind ? Or, like the wise Ulysses, thrown,

ify variíjus fa»s, mi M I M Tiukti'iwii.

H»-.r i l i c m t l i m u ^ l t v u r i o i i s i i l i c s •.iiTiy'rl,

Their customs, laws, and manners wcigh'd ?

T h e : - l d - j i l i i - i i-1 u n i ' i c s i ¡ \ i c | j U ' i l . I ne'er the paths oflearning try'd;

Nor have I roani'd in foreign parts, To read mankind, their laws, and arts;

For man i spractis'd to disguise, He cheats the m o s tdiscerning eyes;

W h o by ibül uvunU shall wisergrow, When we ourselves can never know ? The little know ledge I have gain'd Was all from simple Nature diain'd;

Hence my life's maxims took their rise;

l l i - m r M I , - i v m y M - t i I « I li.-iii1 I I P v i c e .

The dail y labour s of the hee Awake my soul to industry.

Who can observe the careful ant, And not provide for future want ? My dog ( the trustiest of his kind)

W i l h ^ i . i i i i i n i r iníhnu'.i niy m i i u l : I mark h is t r u e , his faithful w a y ,

And in my service copy Tray.

(7)

INTRODUCTION.

Iu constancy and nuptial love, I learn my duty fr om the dove.

The hen, who, from the chilly air, With pious wing protects hercare;

And ev'ry fowl that flies at large Instructs me in

a

parent's charge.

From Nature too I take my rule, 'I

T o

shun contempt

a

nd ridicule.

I ne ver, with important

a

ir, la c o n versa tion overhear.

Can grave and formal pass for wise, When men the sol

e

mn owl despise ? Mv tongue w ithin my lips I rein;

For wlm i.-iíks uiurli muit. 1,ilk iu vola.

We from the wordy torrent fly:

Who listens to the chatt'ring pye?

Nor WOULD I, wi th felonious slight

,

By stealth invade my neighbour's right.

|

Kites, hawks, and wolves, deserve their fate.

Do no twe just abhorrence find Against the toad and serpent kind

?

But envy, calumny, and spite, Bear stronger mal ice in their bite.

Thus, ev'ry object of creation Oiu furnish hints to contemplation;

And, from the most minute and

mean

,

A virtuous mindcan morals glean.

(8)

INTRODUCTION.

Thy fame is just, the sage replies;

Thy virtueproves thee truly wise.

Priilc often (;II¡I1IÍS tlie «UÜior'ji ¡ICD;

Books as a!Secw¿ an: as men:

I

u t

he who studies Nature '

s

laws From certain truth his maxims draws;

And those, without our schools, suffice

To make men moral, good, and wise.

(9)

FABLES BY JOHN GAY.

PART THEtFIRST.

TI) BÍÍ B1GHIÍE4S '

WILLIAM,

DUR.E OF CUMBERLAPÍD.

FABLE I.

TU* L1OH, THE TTUIH, ÍMB TBÍ TH1VE1.I> II

-ACCEPT, young prince, the moral lay, And in these tales ju4iDkitnl w t t w ; With early virtues plant your breast, The specious arts of vice detest.

l'iiri'i^. llke brnutifs, fiimi llli'ir ymirli Are strangers to the voice of truth : Learn to canteian •! praise betimes;

Tur I b l t i r y s the nurse of crimes.

l'l n*n<l slllj' liV l l l i T l l-i'jiriií>l ¡s - i r m II.

(A virtue ne ver near a throne;) In OOnrtl surh frrr-ildiii niust ..HVinl . There none presumes to be a friend.

(10)

F A B L E S B Y J O H N G A Y . To t ho SE of your exalted station Each courtier is a dedicatio N . Must I too natter like tiu WSt, And turn ray morals to a jest?

The muse disdains to steal from those Who thrive in courts bv fulsome prose.

Tínr -IIÍÍIM 1 hirt^ yoni- mil praísr, Oc i''I I you wíuií fl u. H i saya?

T ü r y i u M I U \ - i n l i f ü i i n t s i ' i u í i ' . i i i :

I hev i r t u e s of your royal race:

lu t he fair dawning of your mi ND I Discern you gen'rous, mild, and kind, They SEE you grieve to hear distress, And pant already to redress.

ÍJí> orí: 11 ir heigüt *if pcjnrL altíUn, Ñor ki a nation hope in vain:

t'"or brace YÍV jnsiiy inny prtBggo The virtues of A ri PER age.

Tru ecourage shall your bosom fire, And future actions own yonrsire.

] Ja ^rc r-riH'l ¡ lint tb« lirnve Lovt nii'riry, &w\ iJrli^Jir ín aave,

A ryger, roaming for his prey, Sprung on a rrav'ler in the way;

Tiir pVOBtrttl fiain* a Liftfl *pira, And on the greedy tyrant flies;

With mingled roar resounds the wood;

Thtix ifcih, rhdr obmi ríiütU witlt 1 ill vanquished by the lion's streng

T h e > | H i U r rl f o i í r x t f i n i l s l i i ü I c n ^ i l i . M u1 MKITI 11: • s r.n i«É11 • J L t - j i h i t g f y l o r d ,

V And o n h i ¡ s knees for life implor'd.

Flis Ijff íljf geü^pcnts íi^ro gJivc, T o g e t h e r walking t o his c ave , T h e lion thus bespoke his

hardy beast shall dareconte

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P A R T T H E F I R S T . My matchless strength ! You saw the lí^hr

\ "i-I MIII-.I tíütut m y p o w ' r • n " i r i ^ l i i ; K O Í C M Lo f ú r r p o I ht'ii* n¡ti n r I n u n t - , M y siarviur; & t m n at d i s t a n c e r oam . Withif* IIK\ST ^rM'iís 1 rt-i^u U(NW<

1 h e b o u n d l e s s forest is m y o w n .

H o v c fberl lin: re^iil ü ^ n willi ijEomE, T h e s e carcasses o n either h a n d , 'l'Uose ÍHITU'S rhar w b i t ^ n ídl • 11 •=- J:imJ, M ^ J i n J j í n i l t i ' i ! . - - . j E i t i 1 1 I I J i M | s. i i -i t r ! l , í i. • 11 • •. 11 U thfBfl j a w s .'J¡;ir HWIBWTB USL

Trur, Mya the man, th

e

strength I saw Might wel l the brutal nation awe :

l l a monarc h, brave like yon, glory in so false

a

view ?

invade their neighbour's right.

Be lov'd: let justice bo UN D<.I your might.

Mean are ambitious heroes' boasts

O f U . i M í ' í l L j E l l l S ; ' l l l [ Í ^ l í l l l I ^ l M í - t [ I h r l s I S -

Pir

at

es their pow'r by murders gain, WÍM kin^'i by lnvc rtiitl iut

i

rt

r

\ rei^u.

To nie your clemency hat hs hown The virtue wor

t

hy of a throne.

He a v'n gives you pow'r above the rest, Like heav'n, to succour the disfrest.

The case is pLmu ihc

I;LI]SC ^lury li^th m i vniJ

For be

a

sts of prey, a wrvüo cnia,

HJÍVIÍ Ui3*-n lili* íl;iirtTns of IUJ rcügiL

Yon maoa well. Yet tel

D i d wev y c u ÍÜ OOUTLÍL ;J I I n i I I.' l i n Lt 11 my fjiwQÍug rogilCft agrifC

Mi.ii Jitiiu;ju LÍL-HH-S r u l e Jik.tr m e .

(12)

FABLES BY JOHN GAT.

FABLE II.

A SPANIEL, bred with all the care

T h l l l V f - \ J I . - j II [jr i n 'i Í ' \ t \ ' t J E i • \ u ' h \

Ne'er felt correction's rigid h a n d : Indulg'd to diso bey command, In PÍHDJICTM case bis houi's in/CTt sptlil i Me nn<'i kiuLrt xv 11 :• • It-.jt hirtíí IIÜMIII.

Such forward airs, SO pert, SO SMART , W e r e snre to win his lady's h e a r t ; Each little mischief gain'd him praise;' How pretty were hiíi fa

ilu- w ind was south, the morning fair.

He ventures forth to take the air:

Herangesal L THEMEADOW round, And rolls upon the softest ground:

W b e n ur.ir him u i.ih<tl(O!L &L'cn Was SCARCE distinguish'd from the green :

I íi ;it fmblem ni Tbc fíattVín^ í¿ • i.

Wlial^ livc wirli L-lnwtiü.' a fffntus lost ' T o cities and t h e court Tf¡>m ; A fui Imjí- í:,>íiiit)t í.iil ihi.t- t h r r e : Preferment shall thy talents crown, D«lirv« Dii^n ífií'Lfl: f kuüw íln' IÍ»MI Sir»*iiy* the •ypgphairtB Bkfl you, Of OLD, politer l if e h i n : ! Like you, a conrtier born and LníL

K i a p ; k ; i u ' t l L Í i c t r tLar t o ivlj.ri 1 .>.nfi.

My whisper always met SUCCESS ; The ladies prais'd me for address.

(13)

P A R T THE F I R S T . to hit each conrtier's passion, And flatter'd ev'ry Tkc in fashion:

l i n i J o v e , w h o h a l t s i l i i - r's w a y s ,

At once cut short my piosp'rous days;

And, sentcnc'd to RE t

a

in my natnre, Transform'd ine Ut tbis crawling creature;

I ion ni'(1 I.I n lifr ebsBUM tai nxaa, I wander in the sylvan scene.

For

J

ove the heart alone regards;

He punishes what man r e w a r Howdiff'rent is thycaseand mine!

Willi inca al lrasr yon snp anrf IIIIK•:

Wliilr I,comti'mn'd tú ti » « i i ••• .

Like those 1 Haiter'd feed on air.

F A B L E I I I .

rae MOTntJt, TBÍ HCJISF, wrn TME FAÍK».

\JIVE me a son. The blessings e n t , Weteent ptiatía maté oantmtf How parti

a

l are their doatingeyes!

i \ » f l u i d )•• fi.'ifí' s o faír aad ivi.tr.

Wak'd to the morning's pleasing care, The Mother rose, and sought HE rheir.

She saw the nurse, like one possess'd, With wringing hands, and sobbing breast.

S u c e - . u n i r d i s a s t v r b u s •.. I • ' :

Speak, nurse ; I hope the boy is well.

Deu III.III.INI, ütiuk uní me tu ¡llame •

I i n i s ' l . l c t h c l . t i i v <•:! :

Your precious babe is hence convey'd,

And in the place a changeling la id.

(14)

i¿ F A B L E S BY J O H N GAY.

WHERE are the father ' smouth and nose.

The mother's eyes,as black AS sloes?

St?L- lien:, • clinrkiitg ¡lukwHril erralnre, THAT speaksa fool in everj tarto» I

I he woman' s blind, t he mother cries ; I see wit sparkling in his eyes.

Lord! madam, what a squinting leer!

N u iloiiln t ü f í.iii j l u í li l i c e o lu ¡ >.

-I n ?.« ;is s l j t s p d k e , j ]iÍHltl> -ipritr Pnps t l i i n u g h tlip kcv-lililí-, swifi as Üglit;*

IVri-li'il mi tlic W f l f í l ' l tOjp h a sl.mil>, And thns litr folly reprimands.

Whcntc - fu H i iifi I ln- i sin c o n m l e J lie That WE the world with FOOLS supply ? VVhat! fjxt mil' iJIT'Jpli 1 K rain; anay, For the dull helpless SONS of clay ? Besides, by partial fondness shown, l.iki' >o» ive dtwl iipoii our » « » . Whün- yi'l WHS rver ftiuml ;i inntlii i.

Who'd give her booby for another?

And, should we changew i t h human breed.

H el l might we pass for fools indeed.

FABLE IV.

THE FUGI.t, i n i T I E XMKKBLt OF

A s Jupiter's all-seeing eye

Survey'd the worlds beneath the sky, Froru llii.i sm.-ill spet-fc of rarlb nevé HBl Hatnum ntd sounds ofdiscontent;

For ev'ry thing alive complain'd That he the bardes! Ufe iusUiu <)

(15)

PART THE FIRST,

.love calls his eagle. At the word, f'.-irm- íiiin M;mils t l i f r o y a l lún-i.

The bird, obedient, from heav'n's height,

I I n ^ T i i v i r r l f i u t - r í s JIÍJÍ r n p í i l flighl .

Then cit

e

d ev' ry living thing,

These murmurs which offend t he skies ? For jus ta

r

e Jove's eternal laws.

Let each his discontent reveal;

To you,sour dog, I first appeal.

H;ird is my Jt>!, the hound replie

s

. On what fleet nerves the greyhound flies

!

W hile I, with weary step and slow,

O'ef ]ÍÍÜÍÜS :ÍDÍÍ vali.'s, D C J uiunoLíiius pr>- Tin? mmmDg srt-s my <rli,-«r hr^im,

Nor ends it till the setting sun.

WbeD| H71 the greyhonnd, I

> I \ ^ L i j i r i * I " S " . D I • / • J i j j h í n i \ t

y p y

riic hound i* dowi bul dwbyi m n ;

.iíivr1 nr'cr liiirí iit*anj my <(Ji>roDtfnl.

T l w ÜOD OtKr^d M í e EBBt^l a r r ;

"ílic fi>x , i b r hon's furre aurl htnrT- T\w OOflb iinpIor+(Í I lie p á r o l i s fUf^íat^

TV'hfisr wJugM Xtr.vc mpiiK sírong , íint 1 he pigeon strength of wing DESPIS'D, Añil ifir UOcVfl niutrhless vfllmir pria'rt i

• !;• Jishftf wiish'd tn ^i-i/.r Un- piain;

I [ i r b e a s t í , u * s k i m b e u i d l 1 !••- =•= i i n . '1 ' L U Í , pnvioiu of diiorfiíT « ttstt^

Bach lil.nií'il t\ic yxvtuA h¡\ud of l-'Jlr.

Ble iárj of heav'n then cry'd alond,

JOVE bids disperse the murm'r i n g crowd;

(16)

F A B L E S BY J O H N GAT.

The God rejects vonr idle pray'r

s

. Would ye, rebellious mutineers, Entirely change yonr name and nature,

\uá be the very envy'd m i t n r l ?

What, silentall, and NONEC onse nt ! Re happy, then, aud learn content;

INor imitate the restless mind.

And proud ambition of m

a

nkind.

FABLE V.

TBE «-It.tl ÉOlll UBI THE Í.DI.

A - G A I jri elm a sheep was tied, The butcher's knife in blood was died:

I l i c püticnt Uncí., ni .•.iU-iii 1 Mjjln.

From far beheld the horrid affít

\ savage boar, who near them stood,

I hus mock'd to scorn the fleecy brood.

MI lcowards should be serv'd likeyon:

See, see, your murd'rer is in vie

w

; With purple hands, and reeking knife, Kr strips the skin y e twarm with life:

Vimi ¿[M^rlr'r'rl siir.s1 ynur rircr d t he dying bleat of harm les s lambs Call for r v m t g c O stupid race!

The heart that wanls MTta§B isbase.

1 ni finí» <n nncirnt i rnpJin, U e b « u MI Icnnr in our eyes;

Yet think us b not of soul so tame,

W t l i c h D O M p r . H . - i l n i m i ; - i i i ü . u i i r ;

Insensible of ev'ry ill,

Because we want thy tusks to kill.

(17)

P A R T T H E F IR S T.

kinin, ihnsi

1

ufas liotfiicc pmvr»

lr«n ¡n til ese n t M K M I t h r \ llml

J J i.. • two cfcfaf tlttglIBI Thar "wastp inankind.

Our skins mppfiM tlie w r a n g l i n gbar,

A u d W f l l n v K i i p c i n a y r i - M f t i l l t r n l i ' i i .

Since drums and parchment were invented.

FABLE VI.

1 H E fvinri W J S l i i p l i . <íic Tvinílnv W • e >h ^rirtíiíTi sírtrT t h r í m s e r w F í k e s ;

M"iT- rfii silcnt r bí Bttfit^

Looks back,and trembles as he walks.

I'jírh Jort, Aiicl ev'ry lioll T he trííji»

IN CV'RY creek and corner pries;

'J I I T J I O p C V t i » * c l i f s l \- i J h F J ' i t M i r r > i l n r Ht

A n d >¡Tnnfí> ¡n raptufe ©'« IXÍA ho;inL But NOW with sudden qualms possest.

Mi: s^ Liiirp^ \ú* h . i t t t k , h e i i ^ a t s h i * b r t a s t .

By CPM»rfwBM ütnn^ he wildly stares;

And thus his guilty soul declares.

Had the deep earth her stores confin'd : i

h

i s heart had known sweet peace of mind : Rut virtue's sold. Good pad.s J what price Cau rtTniuponiír tha ¡i.ut^ of ViCtí O bane of GOOD ; seducing cheat ! C a iijíin. mftk man, thy pow'r defeat ? Gold banish' d honour from the mind, And only left the name behind:

3-

(18)

H Y .IO1IN a A Y.

(luid «ow'tl thc würltí « i t l i CT'PJÜJ;

Gold taught the uiurd'rer's sword to k i l l : T W M (íuMju-,1 rii,.'i,.¡ eawartl liearls l u treach'ry's more pernicious arts.

Whoc an recount the mischiefs o'er?

"V irtue resides on earth no more!

He spoke , and sigh'd. I n angry mood, PJiilus, lii-. j>otl, lii'furf l i " " «muí,

1 he miser, trembling, lock'd his chest : The VÍMOU Froivii'd, auct (hiiiaJilrraL:

Whence is this vile ungrateful rant, Liirlj sor did rascal's daily cant ? Did I , base \virk-JiT üúrrnjjt iü:iíiltind ?

The fault's in thy rapacious mind.

l'.ii-.: n -< niy lilt'^>.[i^^ are abns'd, Must I be ceusur'd, curs'd, accus'd?

Iv •_- ci vjrtue'fl ¿plf hy 1LJI;I ves is mndr A cloak to carry ON the trade;:

A n d pow'r, when lodg'dinthe i o ssessio i r ow s tyranny, and rankoppression.

1 lui^ wUuti Liic \L1LITU oranu bis thhirsl . Gold is the canker of the breast :

l i - av'rice, insolence, and pride, A n d cv'rv »htn-kin^ ví<:d ln-iiili

P.ui wlii-n tu viituuiis han']', 'til ffn IB , It blesses, like the dew of heaven:

Like heav'n it hears the orphan's cries, A m i wip<?5 i ' i L- t r : i r > f i - o m w i d o w s1 ''.'•'•

Their etiam un gold shall raisers la y , VVtjft p w n llit-ir Br>riliil Anuís Ffn1 pBT?

Let bravoes THEN, when blood IS SPILT, I' Upbraid i he | s » i i f «mi with guilt. •

(19)

P A R T T H E F I R ST.

t Q

FABLE VII.

THÍ MOX, THE FOX, AND THE

A . n o n , tir'd with state affairs, Quite sick of pomp, and worn with fares, HCKIIV'II. «mote from noise and strife, la peace to passhu ¡ailerlife,

Itwas proclaim'd : the day was Wl;

Behold thegen'ral council met.

The fox vas viceroy nain'd. The crowd To the NEW regent humbly bow'd.

Wolves,bears, and mighty tygers bend, And strivewho mo

s

t shall condescen d.

He straight assumes a sole mn grace,

(!'hllcr:Is J.LÍH l%'i$donj in I»is f a c e ; TUR r i o w í l a d m i r e his w i t , h i s s e n s e ; EACH w o r d h a t h w e i g h t a n d

The flatt'rer all his n i display He who bath pow'r is su re of jir

A fox stept FORT}} before the REST,

And t hus the servile throng add rest:

Howv ast his talents, born to rule, And train'd in virtue's honest school ! What clemency his temper sways!

How nncorru p t are all his ways ! Beneath his conduct and command,

Rapine shall cease to waste the land.

His brain hath strat

a

gem and art;

Prudence and mercy ruk bis heart ;

What ble ssings must attend the natio n

Under his good administration!

(20)

F A B L E S BY J O H N G A T . He said. A goose, who distant stood,

| ] . j > ; i i r ^ ( i " í l o j i a i ! Plic CjickljTjp I i r d r w l .

Whene'er I hear a knave commend, He b ids me slumh i s worthy friend.

IVhüi praiael whal niiplitr eoffljnenH«tSon!

But 'twas a fox who spoke th' oration.

Foxes this government may prize, As gentle, plentiful, and wise;

If they enjoy the sweets, 'tis plain We geese must feel a tyrant reign.

What havock now shall thin our ra ce, When ev'ry petty clerk in place.

Toprove his taste,and seem polite, Will feed on geese both noon aud night !

F A B L E V I I I .

HAT whispers must thebeaulybear I What hourly nonsense haunts h e r e a r ' WhWÍ1 Vr üi-i í-v.-i ilisjifusf tíiorcfeirnur, ImperfiHcncí « ó i m á hto («'arma, Did not the tender Botlieaís strike,

< ontempt and scorn might look dislike :

fo r b i d d i n g airs might thin the p l a c e , I li!' ^t^^^l^t,'.•,l Ib]!,! (ly Í-:III clinse.

But who can drive ihe nura'rous biv I ( t í » mu-, .irtnili'T wiH succeed.

W h o knows a fool, must know his b r o t h e r ; (luí l'[>p ivill rpconniipnrl anotht'rr Andwith this p la gu e she's rightly c u r s t , n she listen'd to the first.

(21)

P A R T T H E F I R S 1 . ai A

s

Doris, at her toilette's duty,

Sat meditating onher beauty, She now was pensive, now was ga y, And loll'd the sultry hours away.

As thus in indolenc

e

she lies, A giddy wasp around her flies.

He ilinv ¡ii]v,-tii!:cs. DOW ri'tirei, Wow ID her ncck nnd rSitt'fc. ai|>¡rí.t.

H I T Em in vain defends her c h a r m s ; Swift he r e t u r n s , again alarms;

For by repulse he bolder grew, l'crrh'iJ OH her lip ainl M[)l ihr ((••»-.

She frowns; she frets. Good g o d s! she cries, Protect me from these teailpg Üips!

in'.ill (liL'pbgncs tlii i )-[',<<i n h a t b s e n t , A wasp is most impertinent.

I he |im linp insect thus complain'd;

A M I then slighted, s c o r n ' d , disdain'd ? Can such offenre your anger wake ?

TWM b u s t j caus'd the bold mistake.

Those cherry lips that breathe perfume, TÍMI ilirrt 5(i ripevvith Jdiílllful hlnom,

Made me wilh strong desire pursue The faire

s

t peach that ever grew.

Strike him not,

J

enny, Boris cries.

Nor mn rdcr wasps like vulgar flies:

For though he's free, (to do him right,) The creature's civil and polite.

I n ecstacies away he posts ; Where'er he came the favonr boaiu:

Brags how hersweetest tea he sips,

And s h e w ifca n g K on his bps.

The hint alarm'd the forward crew:

S u r eof snecess away they flew.

l ' l i c y s t l » M t i » d ü i n t i r s n f t IIP- i l . i v .

Round her with airy musick play;

(22)

F A B L E S BY J O H N G A Y . And now they flutt

e

r, now ifa«y nst, Non Miaij{ja¡g , nuil skim ]JIT tucas!.

N o r were they b a n i s h ' d , till she found That wasps ha ve s t i n g s , a n d felt t h e wound.

FABLE IX.

T H E BU LL A N D THEMASTIF

O E E R JOU to train your favYite boy ? l

•\nfl rrt

1

^yon vírntarf to Let hi s pi'eceptor's heart b y íVctgh WÍ:U LJÍI [temaen, U/e^n

ü u D I C W d ^ p f t t i L IJJV f u u i i c iLo^-

A -. o n -i l'unfí ID jH'rtr-í'fn] [-i'-^n , A buJI •1n;'li 'I rlií1 ífiv.\Y\ fit,iiiFn

A inttsriff p a í nht l ; jufliiiu il í^illi i i Hia ^"-Iirtlla s h o t i n d i g n a n t fire ; H e f o a m ' d , h e ríi^'d Tfith

S p m uínjí ihtr ^iLound T tbti r Ariíl ru;n"d a!ouHr Síispeijíí iU ir• s ^rlii'fr sttJn i-n slscrp t o jilg1 l t i l n l r , CM t i l e bíilflf r^ t ?vi WlirtI ffrniigs jirr>vokír i h n ? i a Is i l ¿uubilitm f$rt9 i h v brufial, O r a v a r i c e t h a t n e ' e r CAN r e s t ?

Vrmn tbc.ít? úaaM QDJnstíj Hprln^f*

The worid-desiroytitg wralh of kin l'ht snví\ míifOiff ÍUUH wi^rrjB:

Wií.Eiiu iity bo.soiii f,'lnrf huruji.

Like heroes of eternal name,

Whom poets sing, I fight for

(23)

PART THE FIRST.

The batcher's spirit-stirring mind To daily war my youth incliu'd ; He train'd met o heroick deed,

Tanght me tocouquer,or tobleed.

Curs'<l IÍÍ'S- Ikí ''nll ri'f.ly'.l, no muí.- I wonderat thy thirst of gore;

l u í ihou (linni-Lilli a b u l i l i r r iVlmsi- banili nitli cruel i y trt M His daily m o l d e n ¡u t h y v i e w ) H u í , like t h y t u t o r , b l o o d p

T a k e t h e n THY fate. W i t h g o r i n g w o u n d , At (inrc lie lifts htm from tln1 |;i'i>iiii(¡ , Aloft the sprawling hero flies, M l i !ic U l s , I u liuivl», ¡mil Jii's.

FABLE X.

T** r.rtuuT u n THE

l u í man wlio, witli uniliKmti'il nál.t, Sails unknown seas, lo nuknmvn BDÜa, With vario LIS ivfmilcrs StmU bñ ?.i^íjt:

Wbüt si ri.:tn^rT vrmdcn ilinhs lie vmte?

Wi! rt-Hil, nuil tn itcsmjtlidii rifít B uwhiofa A.ilaiu itpvor koew:

F o r w h e n we risk no niriMuilii o n . Tt prnmpts tiu- hp|i=ut to cli-.il iu firtiou Tliiwe iliíng.'k ih;it (tartla i r j>n¡

1 graal are strange, yet may be t r u e . WL'i iluiiiils iltai flr¡jliati!,'i RM l.iniut For si i ence and for sen se renown'd? p Born records their strength ofparts, lúUmt ofiLuU|»lil,aiiil ikill Lu artti

(24)

24 F A B L E S BY J O H N GAY.

How they perform thelaw's decrees, And save the state the hangman's fees, A.ml limv by travtl uurlt.-i iinrid The language of aiiüther Jniil.

Let those who question this report, To Pliny's ancient page resort.

J ow learn'd w asthat sagacious breed ! Who now, like them, the Greek can read ?

AS one of these, in da ys of yore, Rurumag'd a shop of learning o'er;

Not,likeourmodern dealers, minding Only the margin's breadth andhinding;

A book his curious eye detains.

Where, with exactest care and pains, Were ev'ry beast and bird POR tray'd That e'er the search of man surve'ytl;

Their na tures and their pow'rs were writ, With all the pride of human wit.

The page lie vrillt ntlention spread, And thus remark'd on what he read.

Man with strong reason is endow

1

d

j

; A beast scarce instinct is all

o

w'd : But let thisauthor'sworth BE try'd, 'Tis plain t hat neither was his guide.

Can hediscern the diffrent natures, And ncipU thc pow'i- IIÍHÜJIT cnstOiW, Who by the partial work hath show n He knoivüBU hule of his own?

How falsely is THE spaniel drawn ! Did man from him first Icam tu fawn?

A dog proficient in the trade!

He, the chief flatt'rer nature made!

Go, man, the ways of courts discern,

You'll find

a

spaniel still might learn.

(25)

P A R T T H E F I R S T . How can i the fox's theft and plunder Provoke his censure OR his wouder?

¡•'rom cnttrüeis' iritis, swilíwjert' Brti The fox might well improve hi

s

pails.

I he lion, wolf,and tyger'sbrood, HE curses for their thirst ofhlood : But is not man Lo man a prey ? Beasts kill for hunger, men for pay.

Thebookseller, who heard him • i A nd saw hin iturn a page of Greek,

I h- inútil: ivlüil a ^.•IIÍII-. liavc t i I ! TbfQ lluií ai] ilivss il n-jlli i>o\w [irul'ouini.

Lcaxa'd Sic.if yoticlcriitiiujV'iiir pen Against the senseless sons uf rni'u, O r w r i t e the history of SIAIN,

\ u man is better pay than I am:

(Ir . si neo y o i í r e Icírn'd io G I C T K . tfl's n t Something against the Trini i .

Wüeu ndiikliii}¡ ivilh ;i n m - r ln% I r n n k ,

I • i T - i r l , i j u í i t h L l n - i : l i ' ¡ ! l l ! i n l , yon r

E'en kcej] r u n r m n n r y , .-md í)« iviac;

Leave man on man to criticise:

FOT 1li.il y m i t i r ' r r e n n n m i a jn-n A i t i n n g l l i c ncusi.-Ii-Níi M U u f n i i ' i i :

They nnprovok'd will court th e fray:

Envy '

S

A sharperspur than pay.

JVo HUtlinr rrver .sp.vi 'il s l>rr¡[)n;r;

Wits ai* pjne-COdu lo u¡u' ^iiulbct

FABLE XI.

THE PEACOCK, THE TURKEY, AND THE GOOSE.

I B iwMitty f;inlls i'o

h l i i ^ c i i uu snuvv.

(26)

I A B L E S BY J O H N G A Y . As near a barn, by hunger led, A peacock with the poultry fed;

AJÍ v i c u i l liim iwib ¡in ciiviiiu* uve.

\m\ tiim-k'd hia giudj pageantry*

He, c onscious of superior merit , 1 ontemns their base revilingspirit;

His state and ilijjuity M U » , And to the sun displays his plumes;

Which, like the heav'n's o'er-arching skies,

\IT ipanf^ed iviib s liiuui'tmi tjm, The circling rays, an

d

varied light, Atonce confound their dazzled sight:

On ev'ry tongue detraction burns .

• \ u i l l n . i l i i ' i ' | ) l r i i l l j l l s l l l f i l1 » [ i ] f f l l I ' V t u r u S . Mark with what INSOLENCE and pride

Tlir iifiínn

1

tukcs liís bau^hty «triifc!

'1 lii' lnrkf\ cries. ( .121 splitu 1-iitll.uu ?

Sure m e i Liird was half so vain:

líu 1 wiTf inttilIHÍok íiii'rit H M | Wt: tnrkrys liuvt lli< «hí(ur akiii.

Proa liiii^ur 10 lilllglli- Illc-y (MUgllt llniM-,

Vrifl next was heard the hissing goose.

\\ a t hideous legs! whatf llttliy daws]

[ jcom lo c

e

nsure littlef laws.

Tiltil «h.il • hurrirl íijiiímtiiip lliroitl!

liv'rt 'i»ls KM fi iglitütl nt flit Doto- True, thosearefaults, the peacock cries;

M y si'i'i'ítni | iny SIIÍMILM y m i i n » v LÍespiae;

B u t s u c h b l i n d . r i l t t k i mil in vain : W l u i , .n-.-ilmii. my i.nli.uii t r a i n i K m n v . liitl iny IP^S, yiiEii' UtOTB :lIJr.1 Hporí., T

he turkey or the goose

s

upport,

And didyr MI rain .lilll iiarsllcr srinml, 'Jliusf íjulls in you ÍIAJ ne'et b n i i fiiuuil ; To ill ;i|>¡i:irf¡ii beatttia tímé ,

E í hltntislj strikesan env-ous mind.

(27)

PAR T THE F I R S T . Tbiis ÍJI i*s«mhUM h&\c I ircii

A I!', I r r p • | r o f b T l g h t U l • • h . 11 r t L -. . 11J. I I • L -i. - d ]

Wake envy in each ugly face,

\i.-l hn/jwnj: SCflmtfl] filJ t l i e p l a c e .

FABLE XTL

C U F T f t , HT1UF.N, A S O PWTKTI

i Cupid i n O v t h e r a ' s grove 'íl the lesser pow'rs of love, Some shape t h e how, m fit the string, S i u n r ±'\\ •- iJn1 u j i e r sli-il! i(> iviiip, ( I r IÍU'EI lh<- jtfili-.li ti í ¡ n i \ í - f s j n r m l i L I ) r heqíi t h f í i ü r í i ivith i i - m p ^ r ' i l ¿;nld+

AmiihT ÚuAt toil and variou scase,

[ i l V S h y i i j r t l - , WíÚi N N ^ l i l l i i l J ^ . i ¡ t h

V l J i r ^ i ! i h c 4>n(3. I í i o u p u i b J i u t l r l i Of a u k w a r d a n d til j u r l ^ m ^ w i t , ti m t e l l f l f l iin* imi ljtjíí<Li m n d eT

Ai once J nmM f-oftwetr HIT trjttíe.

Yon fie/id úie such E!I rtn¡itlt'¡} irtí'k.^.

q A pin, A feather, And wonder how the y came together.

I li<- B ' p p

I ti1 | O V « nfíTllTB»d 'I tul 1 ¡ IJ r- T <-Ht I ii-l M hFI j

\DÍ\ . s L r ¡ss H CLH | ¡ k r % i í ) u t r o t Ü L l I í j u :

sin- never slavishly submits;

Shr-IJ Jiavi'Uer t\iil.,oi ttnvi: lie r fita, Be THIS way tugs, she t'other d r a w s ; THE mnn grows jealous, a n d with cause.

(28)

23 FABLES BY JOHN GAT.

Nothing can save him but divorce;

AIILI Itere lili- \ví(r r<implii» al i-oursc.

When, says the boy, had I to do With eitheryour affairs or you?

I ni-vri ¡illy *priid my liarla:

You trade in mercenary heart Vor settlements the lawyer's fce'tl;

Id ni y liüiid wirnpss t" 'ln* J w d ? If they like cat and dog agree, G o r.iil • ( l ' l i l i i i s . n o t ¡il iiii-

n]iiiiisa|ijw.iiií. Mutoaid: TÉS» m í e ; In marriage goldi s ALL their view;

Tin y tttk Otñ beauty, wit, or sense;

A nd love is arld«ro \he pretence.

All •••'ri-i i m i r o E i ' a t u n .slirim-.

And T itoOC the bargain sign.

H o n u a Eldfaufa Uaná k n bMt?

She oiüy láCi a great estate.

Doris was rich enough, 'tis true;

BEn lord mnii pve her title t o o ; And cv'ry man, or rich or poor,

\ fortune ;isks, and asks no more.

Av' rice, whatever shape it beats, UlWA •.(;!! be coupled wii!i ÍM OBH,

FABLE XIII.

THE T i m STAG.

A s a young slag the thicket past.

The branches held his antlers f a s A clown, who saw the captiveh unp, Across the horns his lia t u r flung.

(29)

P A R T T H E F I R S T . 2g Now safely hamper'il in the cord,

II. limr ' h . pHMnt 1" llis liii il- ll i> Iflfd wns jileusd; :is wa« tile ctiivin, When he was tip'd with half-a-crown.

T h f iíafi WÍS liroiiftln tieforir Lia vvife;

T h r tínder ¡aciy bi-Jis'"^ ^ ^ li í p-

How lleek"» du skin ! 1 ™ apcck'd like ermine ! Sutr utuT urettme m i so d a iny !

Al lirn mtfais Mu' v.in! roiitin'J, líe llifs jnij hidi's I'IIJJH ni) ni:nitin(!.

NOW bolder grown, with lix'd tOUt,

•\iiil dislanl ;iivi', firpfliiriieí In "nzs;

MiinrÍLr.i; Tin- Ijneii 1111 ÚM SlMI j

A nd on a hood orapron dines;

))<• steals my litt le master's bread, í nllnu> ilit* .Hfj-i'+nnti tu I I Í íetl:

Effcorrrfiíid n<nrer mm hf >I¿UIU.

To li-cl Ihe pr;nst' OÍ [i.iKJUf; h.'imJr. : IAJIIIHIIP.-Í tu 11 llst fnr meiit.

And though repuls'd, cBsdahu i c i r t a i ;

\ ttSelu ;i¡zrtíit ivitli irvílTrl liui n> : A n d uiau7 iluit w.m 1*1 ¡K trrrm-,

Sutli in llir rriiiril IV m¡i¡i¡.'ii - fríglir, lVli'/u first a red-coat is in sight, Jltliind tile dfior slic- iililes licr ÍH(!s ; Next time at distance eyes the lace.

She NOW can all his terrors stand, SOI frnrli his Mim-ivi1 «illiili.nv.s I I I T li.iri-l Ntir plays familiar in his arms,

\ n d H ' I T soldier hath his c harms.

I10111 tont tti IPQI ihe aipnada fax llame;

l-'urciuitfini [(ii)i|jirrj fi.u and sb.ifue.

(30)

3o FABLES BT JOHN GAY.

FABLE XIV.

m i nin»KF.v ivnn ata s r i í TUT IVÍTOLO.

A .MONKEY, to reform the times, Resolv 'd to visit foreign c limes:

F n r lll.-ii llt i l i s l a i i l n g i o i U i i u i l l

T o bri n g p o l i t e r m a n n e r s h o m e . S u flirt li lie E t n a ; .ill loils clHiirJ : Mi^fju iiiiií- perves ii> inTikLT n \ wi.ír.

At lciif;lh lltf rmiclí'roLU auare n o s (aid:

P o o r pnffWU C;IIIÍ;!II, l o imvn c:O0vey'(i, T h r i v Í O M . H o w P I H \ ' I [ wns lii1- d o a i i u MuiJi* Oiptivt í " O !:li Kf. 11X1111 ! l'rfuiil tu • Ifivci- tif Lis c l i u i i s , B í ihiy b j ÍOJ l i ' r f'nvrmr {rain*.

Wlirtir c-i- lUf iltiiy «f llitr rtiry The toilette calls; with mimick play He twirls her knots, he cracks her fan.

Likt' J n y o i l i i T ^ruili-iiuiu- In v s¡i, too, his parts a n d wit, W'Iiru j t s u f i * * ilnll. wfip s u r r ID lili.

l'F'íinrl «illi ;i|.[lialili-, lie ihiniglll hi) i>¡i:iii IM gv'rj iiouritTiiit n:f¡ii dj

Likc Orjihrrufp, iitiml tvilli pülilirt ical, To tivüfií [iii- Münkey-iVf:il ¡ So woteh'd uimníiii. braba bis rli»iu,

And sought his native woodsa gain.

I lie lin¡i\ sytnmt rnlín.i Imii |iii-).i.

Astonish'ii at hisstrut and dr e ss.

SOME praise hissleeve;a n d ot IHTÍ pinte

( ' [ • i . i i h i l i i i ! i Í m I t r m 1J1 i i ! C O 1 I ;

(31)

P A R T T H E F I R S T . His dapper pamirig Mi

With the black tail behindde p His powder'd back, above, below,

L

ike hoary frost, or SeKJ snow;

r.ui ;ill. «itíi fin y utiil dt'sirr, His ílutl rmg shoulder-knot admire.

Hear, and improve,he perúj cries;

Icome to m

a

ke an ation wise.

Wei(fh youroivii ivmtli Í ^^lppú^l yoirr [ilnce.

Tin- BOU in r;i nk la liuiii.iu roce.

In citie

s

long I pass'd my days,

Cao ver Vil witíl iiicii. and lcaru'd tlirii nnv..

T

heir dress, theircourtly manners see;

Reform your state, ÍDII copy me.

Se

e

k ye to thrive ? in flatt'ry deal;

Your scorn, your hate, with that conceal.

Seem only to regard YOUR friends, Uní uset hem for your private ends.

Stint not to truth thefl

o

w of wit;

Tie prompt to lie idunt'W 'tis lit.

Bend all your forc eto spatter merit:

Scandal ií oí.tivprsali.jn's spirit.

Boldly to ev'ry thing pretend, Anil nicii your tnlpiils iliail eáauuwnL I knew the great. Observe me right;

So ih:ill mu grow, like man, polite.

He spoke, andbow'd. With mutt'ring jaws Thewond'ring circle grinn'd applause.

Now, vvarm'd wíih nfiea, envy, spite, Their most obliging friends they bite;

And, fond to copy HUMAN ways, Practise new BÍfdUcA sil ltheir days.

Ü I I the dull lad, too tall

travel finishes the fool;

(32)

:• F A B L E S B Y J O H N G A Y.

STUDIOUS of ev'ry coxcomb's airs, He drinks, games,dresses, WHORES an O'erlooks with scorn all vir tuous a r ts, For vice is fitted to his p a r t s .

FAJtLE XV.

THE PHILOSOPHER AS II PHE

Lñt sage, awak'd at early da y , Through the deep forest took his way;

Drawn by the mnsick of the groves, Atoug llii' wíuilillggtooa fu- rüvi-s:

I rom tree to trcr ÚM warbling throats

!'i,.¡i,n:; iÍ!>' sivcel nlti-rniíle u o t t t . Bul HIITIC HE past, he terror threw, T h o í o n g iirokc símil, lli<- wtttbleM {lew;

T h e thrushes chalter'd with affright, A tul IÍI;:II I iiiii-ilc.-. .ililn ,i i il b i s s i g t i t : AÜ a i l i l l l i i l s brtYui- lililí u n . T u .siiuii t h r l i i i t r f u l s i f ; l i t u f ni n i

Whence is this dread of ev'ry creature?

l'ly lluy om ÜHHH' nr otir nalmef As t hus he walk'd in musing ihonghf,

H i s c £ u J m j t LJr f t - iLl J ILIXÍJJ I Í > - ( " l u ^ l i L :

W i t h c a u t i o u s s t e p h e nearer d r e w Ky lili' I h i i k ™luuli; (Tünueiil'd froni TOJW.

H IJIJ o n t b e b i . i i u í i .1 [ i l i r a s í i u s t o u t t , ALIJÜIIÍI b u .ill i i i i-i 11 mi; l'Hi.nl , 1'i'iiDtl o f tbt! bir<tüliigs uf h i t iicsf, O M I b i l í .1 niüIlii'ÉS care P \ ¡ I M - > I .

Kn dangers here shall circumvent;

Within the woods enjoy content.

(33)

P A R T T H E F I R S T . Sooner the hawk or vulture trust

y

Than man, of animals the worst.

Ju him ingralitude you FIND,

A VICE peculiar to the kind.

The sheep, whose annual fleece is d i ed,I, Toguardhis h n l A a d j a m bis pride, Forc'd from his fuld nuil native plain*,

h ii) llic ti'iii'l übnmbkíi ílain.

The swarms, who, with industriousskill, His hives uilh n i and honey fill, In vain mhtit* — " • days employ

1

d.

Tbcir slorea are «il(L ifitir noé dunotfd.

What tribute from the goose ispaid!

Does not her wing all science aid !

Does it not lover's hearts explain,

Añil ilrml{¡f tn raisc tlic me relia nJ.'s g.iin:' What now rewards this gen'ral use?

He tlltM tur r|iulls, muí cali iLif goosr, lVIiin ilip» avoirf.Hfrtcsl liisways;

So safety shall prolong y o u r days.

v\ hrii siTi-irca artr thus arifiritlnl.

Be surr we pheasants must be spitted.

FABLE XVI.

TCTí TIS I T n THE

A. P I S , who Img ha<1 serv 'd a beanty, Proficient in the toilette's dutv,

Mari fonu't! Lpr ulervt. CIIDJÍÍ) ti htt li«¡r,

Or giv'n her knot a smarterair,

Now nearest to her htWt m plac'd,

Now in her mantua's t

a

il disgrae' d;

(34)

U I

1

MILES 11V .IOH.S GAY.

But could she partid faxtmu blame, Who saw herlovers serv'd the U I I K '

At length from all kei bañan» cast, Through vario us turns of life she PAST; • M u w ^ I Í I I I N ' I ! o n i t s i l í r t ' l ¡ii-jii i Now kept a heggar's infunt m i m ; Now, c:irij,''il vv ¡lliia a niiser's co;il, I o ntr ibutes to his yearly groat;

Now, rais'd again from low approach, She visits in the doctor's coach;

Here, there, by various fortune tost.

Ai ht.i in (íi mil mil Iiilit irim Inirr

! ii:i. M.'.I (ñth ilir1 wonuers of lite shoví, On ev'rj ñáe, above, below,

S h o IKIW ni' tilia cir lliiii r [ i c ] t i i r « , W h a t least w a s u n d e r s t o o d a d m i r e s .

f i s |)]niii,r¡i€li rliiiif; s o s t r í i c k h e r u i i m l , Her head's of virtuoso kind.

And pray what's this,and this, dear Sir ?

A needle, says thJ interpreter.

Küc knew the name. And thus the fool Address'd h e r a s atailor's tool.

i in'rtlli' witli llint filtliy -.inii'-.

Quiteidle, al l with rust overgrown!

Y o n litillcf uiighL i'jji|i!i>y y u n i porta, And aid thesempstress in her arts.

Rut tell me how the friendship grew Between THAT paltry flint and you ?

Friend, snyh ÚU needle, cease to blame;

I follow real worth and fame.

KTIÍIVV'SI thou ihp linidisioiie's pow'raml acl, That virtue v i i t u o onn impart?

Of all his talents I partake,

Who then c an 11 such a friend forsake?

'Tis I direct the pilot's hand

To shun the rocks aud treach'roussand:

(35)

PART THE FIRST.

R j m e TIpj- i l i s l i i n i crorld i» L u n w r r , Amie ither I n d i a i s o u r own.

l i a d I n i t l i t ü i l l í i H T i lifi-ji h r c t l , W h ü l l i a d I ÍÍCIÍQ ? T i l e J^uidr* nT I ItifMit ;

\m\ ilrutl^'il et raiga ncsdlts du, UP un more i:ou9cfjunicr Üiiin y<m.

F A B L E X V I I .

THE SHEPHERDS DOG AND TBE WOLF.

\ w oi.r, with hunger jSoM iad bold,

R a v u ^ M i h e p h t t i í í , i i u d \ K m ti ri i h r 1'uJil . J ) e t j i i u tlie w o o d MdUT6 l i r I n y , J IK i h e f t a u f jiijiJif « g a l ' d ihrr d;ty.

l í i v a i n Üir .s Ej L fJJ i r-a LJ g \va.kjíftil OSffl

¡F.if] trprcari i EM- t o i l í , and m i k E i V I Üic SH.H'I- Iri v n i n i lie d n ^ [ J I J I S U J h i s |j«rr%

í fl eeter robber morVd the chase.

A s Li^hlf[Mjj r a o [ í d iJit- Hut-st r o u u f ! . Tí y i h i i m - i1 l i i \ f o f ' s r f t i ' t í i i h e F o u u J -

L c t LIS .1^JIIJI; ibi1 Mar •viiiju-mf.

A n d rra^wi U í n i n i li r<mi bo í i iCílil.

V i nwe ? replies the wolf. ' T

i

s done.

The dog the parley thus begun :

K o w vJín thal jjTronp int n-jhi'l i i i i u d _Vti:u^k A wcñk defcoct'Lrss kiuiL?

Thoéefvn a h o o l d p i t j MU U¿J[III f fn.n], A n d drink ,the boar's n n d ü^n s b l o o d . i r f f e t i B O Q Í f l u i f l i g e n V C H E U j i i r y Í M F I r , Which coward tyrants never fell.

ilow EutrnilflAs UCHÚ fleeoj L-are!

Be brave; ;md let thy M E rcy spare.

(36)

FABLES BY JOHN G A Y.

l-'rirmj, «ays tile wolf, lliu UIÜIILT í n i Nature design'd us beasts of preyJ As such, when hanger Jinds a Ireat,

'Tis necessary wolves sUíiulti t0L If M indful of the bleating weal,

Thy b os o m burn wilb u i l zeal,

Hí-ni'f, :tml thy m m i t luni To him repeat the movings p A wolf eats sheep, but now and t h en; Ten thousands are devour'd by MEN.

A n íjjfrn r<K itisy prare u n n s i , But a pretended fiiend is worse.

F A B L E X V I I I .

TIIF. r j i i i r n WHO n.ttsEii nOMOtn jlKtt IVEKY (unt

J_j E i t nifn íTi^pt^n yonr tüic a n t r u e . Keep probability in view.

Tlií [I.IV'II'I Ira [mi j; o'sr tltosr- bounils, The credit of h is book confounds.

W I r • u : . r | j h j » J ^ n ^ i i ' I L : H l i - I I n i n .1.1* l i n i i f i Makes ev'n his real cou i rage doubted.

Tlnt Il.itL'ry ni/ver H 0 u ali*iii J ; 1 hr ÍJatlcrM Nlviayí mVv yotir \wjnl;

lrupr.ir¡HÍtii]i1iL-6 se^lli [usi :

T h f y tnkt1 Ilit- tliQBSBy praiie nn troof Hyperboles, t h o ' ne'er so great, Wiil hlill cüjur sljiul tiT ¿clf-CCítH^ií.

i VER y like a pain

lí<" hit cüiuplexiün, r£iruii So just, tiie Ufe itstlf TIUM i

(37)

P A R T T H E F I R S T . 3 j To flatt'ry

w

ith his colours laid,

To hloom restor'd the faded maid;

He guvi- úcb niüseli-nll ir.i stmi(>i!i:

Tüf iiioiitü. rlis chin, rlie uusr'j, Jf-njjlh, H¡a luuirsi fn-iuí IÍ Igurh'd mili trutll, And mark'd the date of age and youth.

He lost his friends, his practice fail'd;

I. JIIÍI sliunld nol abnyti lii- ruveal'd;

IN dusty piles his pictures lay,

l''ur no eme sciii Lije HoOBd |

T

wo bustoes, fraught ivítb ev'ry grace, A Ve n US ' and Apollo's hes, He pl

a

c

'

d in view; resolv'd to please,

'Vliiirvi'r tat he drewfrom these, From these corrected ev'ry feature, Aad sjiii-ítcd c:ich nukwnni BTCOtniB.

AJÍ ÜÚBff were set; the hour was come, His pallet ready o'er his thumb;

My lord appiarM; udsejlted right,

l i i p m p f r ¡iiiMmlf and Ilfilir,

'i The painter look'd, he sketch'd ihe piece, Then dipt his pencil, talk'd of Greece, Of Titian's tints, ofGiiido's a ir;

y p

Mi^ht Wfll J Ktfiaéft Itainl j l ' o g i r a ilicni al I llir iiJIivi- lire;

Ttir ft:iLares füin^lu wkl] n n u and 1 mi II pr.iilt. :IIT V P I \ hjird to liil;

But yet with patience you shall view .1» much as paint a nd art can do.

Observ e t h

e

w o r k . My lord reply'd,

T i l ] l l r m I f l l O U ^ I l i II1V l l l i i l U l l M H WJ

. my ION is somewhat long;

I.KMI Sir, for me, 'tis far too VOANG.

Oh! pardon me, the arlist cry'd,

I n t h i í M p a i n t e r s m u s t d e c i d e :

i

(38)

38 FABLES BY JOHN GAY.

The piece ev'u common eyes IIIUM strikc;

I warrant it extreme l y like.

My lord examin'd ita NEW;

Pía looking-glass seem'd ha lf so true.

A lady came: with borrow'd grace HE from his Team focin'd her face.

Her lover prais'd the painter's a r t ; So like the picture in his heart ! To ev'ry age some charm he lent;

Ev'n beauiies werealmost con tent.

Through all the town liis ,tri y His custom grew; his price was rais'd.

Had he the real likeness shown, Would auy man the picture OWN ?

Tíni U J J Í Í I tfam t u u m U j K l Encii fouml titt [Í\IISIV:?Í& iu

FABLE XI X.

THE I.IO XAND THE CUB.

11 u w fond are men ofrule and place.

Who court it from tile rinrau n d base.' TJir.it: ÓtDHal betx na ÍIJOM] uigfi But from superior uitTir l]y

r

They love the cellar's vulgar joke,

Anc] JOM.L iheir Tioiirü in .nle orui MMIÜLC ;

XheM oVr some petty club presid

e

; So poor, so paltry in thei

r

pride!

IS'iiy, FT'TI mth fm>l» ivliole ni^lits will sit, Iu btffioi tf> he ínprfMne m mi,

lt llií'ec CJIÍI enfd) to ÚMU I writtt

To s

e

t their worth iu truest light.

(39)

P A R T T I I E F I I t S T . A lion-rnl». i • i. ! ' ind, A\o:,flrd Jill Ibc lian Kiti'l ¡

Fond of applause, he sought the Of vulgar and ignoble beasts;

With asses all his time he spent, Theirclub's perpetual preside nt.

He c aught their manne rs, l

o

oks, and An a.s,^ m pv

+

ry ihiii^. buí CJIT*Í If e'er his highness meantajoke, They grian'd applause before he spoke;

But at each word, what shonts ofp Good gods! how naturalhebrays!

Elatewith flatt'ry and conceit, HE seeks his royal sire's retreat;

Forward, and fond to show his parts, í^iij;h[ic5' bray.; thelion starts.

Puppy, that curs'd vociferation Betrays thy life and c onversation : Coxcombs, an ever-noisy race, Are trumpets of the

;

r O

J

H disgrace.

Why ÍO «verc! thec ub replies;

Our senate always h

e

ld me wise.

H»w weot ií pride! returns the sire;

All fools are va.n, when fools

a

dmire!

But KNOW, nbaí ütupid asses prize, Lions and noble bmsü dolpae.

FABLE XX.

OLD ms AND THE COCK.

J \ £ S T H A I » yonr child; <ron'U ÍOOI;

The text which says we sprung froml ive.

(40)

t,o FABLES BY JOHN GAY.

As an old hen led forth her train,

And ÍP^III M íf.i jjtrk tf> aben i tie |>mim

She rak'd the chaff, she scratch'd the ground, And glean'd t he apsetOSa y¡ud

chick, to try her wings,

And prone she drops. Themothe All day with sorrow was possest.

A coírk she met; lit'i" SEJ LI lite k i A QÍÍ i 11 IIÍT Ttraj-I nifccUon gnw,

My son, says she, I grant yonr years

Ifííve rmofa'd bVfÓBCJ J» inothvr'a caics*

1 see yon vig'rous, strong,and bold ; 1 hearwith joy your triumphs told.

'Tis not from cocks thy fate 1 dread;

But let thy ever-wary tread A vo id yon WELL; that fatal place

l^ sure perdition to our race.

PrmL tljin luy i ruitiíjil nn Uiy brujut;

To the j ust gods I leave the rest.

He thank'd her care: yet day by day His bosom burn'd to disobey ; And ev'ry time the well he saw,

^' nm'fi ÍQ !lÍS IH :ifl lllP fflQÜsJj IflW ;

]Vear and more near each day h e drew, And long'd TO t

r

y the dang' rous view.

Wby WM íhis idk cbiirgí? í

1

lie Gí ití.

Ltt í-íiura^t fn 11 :•! e fears dí'&piíf

1

. Or did she doubt my heart was brave, And Lbciflfi>rf ÍIJLÍT iníiiíif íion pave?

Ordoes her harvest store the place,

A inMbiiir Foi Inri" yüunyei1 ract'E

And would she ihus my search prevent?

T stand resolv'd, and dare th' event.

h

rbus &ait\, \\f_ raimnís tlie Tnnryiifs ronntl,

And pries INTO the depth profound.

(41)

PART THE FIRST. 4,

lie stretch'd his neck; and from below With stretchng neck atlvanc'd u ÍOP;

With u rath his ruffled plume he rears, The foewith ruffled plu me appears:

Thr?at answer'd threat: his fnry grew, Headlong to meet the war he flew.

But when the wat'ry death he found, H E thus lamented as he drown'd:

1 B9'« l u d been in this co ndi tion, Bnt for MY m other's prohibition.

FABLE XXI.

THE RAT-CATCHER AJtD Ú X S .

1 .n E rats by night such mischief did,

]í«<hp was EV'RY morning chid:

Tbey iiuücruiiu1!] tvlio'r sidesof bneoa.

Hcr Atete wta mpjt'il. hi'r larts m m l a k í o ; Her pasties, fenc'il with thickest paste, Wi re ail (l<*iunlis)r<! and !niil WWtBi SHE curs'd the cat for want of duty.

W h o left her foes a constant booty.

An engineer, of noted skill,

Etiptg il l a stop tlie «foiviui; i]1,

From room to room he now surveys Their haunts, theirv.oiks, theirsecret ways.

Finds where they' scape an ambuscade, And whence the uig'hly sally's made.

A11 asvioui í-íil fnuil |il:ii'p lo ¡ilacc,

Unseen, attends his silent pace;

She s

a

w that, if his trade went on, The purring race must BEU n d o n e ;

4.

(42)

FABLES BY JOHN GAT.

So secretly removes bis baits, Aud ev'ry stratagem defeats.

Again he sets the poison'd toils, .\ nrl p o s ¿i^.iin 11n • - l>boQr fbils.

W h a t foe, to frustrate my desigus, M T s r l i n n r s t h u s niplitly riiiiult-riuints f Incíti'r'ík he cvi**s i ihíi >i:vy iiour Tlie i m l d i duQ bli'td baoeub mj |iowr.

So said. A pond'rous trap he brought, And in the fac t poor puss w » cMnplit.

Smuggler, says be, tbo u sbalt be made A victim toour loss of üaüm.

~\ \ir í.Mptívo r a U WJtll píteOQJ rnr-rt1., l u í ¡ r . u . t . i i i , i i i r . Í I I L I I tnxáom s n u s .

í >Tn' j n l ' r p s t i s n u i i-cirbj H I ^ T I t ' n i r , What insolence. 'the man reply'd:

shall c a t s with us the game divide;

Were all your interloping BAUD Extinguish'd, orexpell'd the l and,1.

We t:il-crtlrliti s ini^lir rnisí? tiur ft-cs, Solé pmrfliíinA of a nnlJíia'A o b e ^ A '

A eat, who saw ij.it' l¡fti,d knife.

IIIII^ s|itjkt-T anrl sav'íl lirr sisttrr^ ÍÍÍÍÍ : ín fv'|-y íipí» Jinfl ülittív, l u : >,t't'h

'Yvftt o f a M'nrli1 IMII ui'Yr rt^i're.

['iirli b u l o lita m:i¡;hliQTir fdr rm-rrlitcllill^ ; 'Síjuirr stignutüvi 'srjnirr For juK¡irhiiífí ; Besnities wiib hcAüi.iejj ar<- JM auus^

And ariindíil ptrU,t cach o t h r r \ cltAi'liíjf ; Kiopí> hHl lln'ii-'nr'¡j;lili':llr kill};.'. ilclhrouc, [TI IHÍJH- 10 llinktr Ehc tvul ]d illrir uw'll.

Bal fr J QJI lir>M! niir ili-surv,

'Noi fnrfiks bflflulin! k.ings^ and TSÍJUÍLJCS : 1iLiun though we b o t h one prey p u r s u e , 'Jlicic'D yaiiu' ciiíjiiyli fur us uud yon.

(43)

P A R T T H E l'¡U ST, , |

J A U i.K X X ! I.

i . 13 círrlaíit lliat iliir moctish pamioiu

Descend among the croud Jikefashions:

E x c a n m e l i i u n it' p r i i l c , t ' t i n i i i i .

(Tlifi BMmnera oftho (htenid ¿;r«it,) I pvo to monkeys, asses, dogs, Mi J - , owls, goats, butterflies, and [ « y lil;il tlirsr .in; jirmiJ. H'íl.il t

I never *a¡fi 1 hey equal men.

A goat, as vaín u g Affeeled singularity.

\\ ene'era i hymy batik HE found,

Ui: r o l l ' d iiuiii] ih<* f m g m n l {^roiincl;

A t l d (ln-n w i l i l l'í^jif n t l r u l m n ttaod^

1 hate my frowzy heard, h e c r i e s : My yon th ü) to«t tu tiiis dií|ftti*».

JJiil NDI ilie feiu;i]ní liiiijiv my vi^onr, VVhll mi^iit rlmj' liwlli (iiis lev'rnu! ligare.

llrsdlv'tl |u sinimlh llís sltüjíi-y l'iuv.

Be MI n^lii. I1H> bttriwrof the plnnp, A ilippant monkey, spruce and smart, Hiítíl [jy, jjr(ift\is j iln- i k i ] i p i - r « n .

His pole with pewter basons hung,

Ubiík n i t t n i u-ttli iu firilcr í[i-iiEg!

RjtUg'd (TpfPS, Üuit in lile víiuihnv BtOod, Lin'd with red rags, to look like blood, Did well his threefold trade explain, WIio slwv'd, Jrew teelli, u n j Li%3llr¡| n vel

(44)

i-i F A B L E S KY J O H N GAY.

The goat he welcomes with

a

n air, And seats him in his wooden chair:

IÍOFII!), Done, and clin kí thc isihrr hiiles:

Light, smooth, and swift, the razor glides.

1 hope your cnslom, Sir, says pug:

Sure never face was half so .-mus.

The goat, impatien t for appl

a

use, Bwift b) tiic acigbb'iins liiU nitlirlrans;

Theshaggy people g iinn'd find mi'il.

Heigbtiay! what's here? withouta beard.

Say, brother, whence the DIRE disgrace ? Vi h

a

t ENVIOUS hand hath robb' d your I V h i tUijí. ILP ínji wirli siuittís of icora:

¡

liv'n M

u

scovites have mow'd t Shall we, lik

e

formal capuchins, Stubb

o

rn inpride, retain the mode, And bear about the hairy load?

Whene'er we through the village stray, Are m not mock 'd along the nay;

Insulted with loud shouts ofscorn;

By boys our beards disgrac'd and torn ? W er

e

you no more with goats to dwell, Brother, I grant you reason well, Keplies a bearded chief. Beside, If boys can mortify thy pride, IInvv inli ihuii stjuil lili

1

ridii'ule Of our whole flock ? affected fool!

Oiícmiilis tiistm^iiisli d frrtm liie r«f

To all but coxcombs are ajest.

(45)

PART THE FIRST i$

FABLE X X I I I .

THE OLD WOMAN AND HER CATS.

w i no friendship with a knave hathm Is judg'd a partner in the trade.

THE matron who conducts abroad Awillingnymph, is thought a bawd;

And if a modest girl is seen With one who cures a lover's spleen, We guess her not extremely nice, Aiul oiih- trufa W kndwlifr ¡irire '1is thus, that ON the choice of friends Our good or evil name depends.

A wrinkled hag, of wicke

d

fame, T;.-Milr- u littlt -.r !•. > flamc

Sal hov'ring, pinch'd wi

t

h age and frost;

H Í I d n á T í i l ' d li.inil*. «-lili vciii5 « m f a a t t ' á ,

Upon her knees her weight SUSTAINS, VVLilc psilsy jliook fier etnüy hadas;

She mumbles forth her backward pray'rs, Anu ntam'dscold of femtatow ¡tan

About her swarm'd a imm'rous brood

Ofcats, who lank with hunger mew'd.

Tea/Al with theircr i e s , her choler grew,

Autl liius sin' ijraoor'd: Benee, ye ettm;

F o o l lliaI I R U l o i;LiLurr.L¡[i

S u í h ¡IUJIS, stiplt ) i ™ i l s , ¡i Lillislt ( r a i d I1 i<l \i- lifí-n n c v t r bruis'd ;in(! n u r s ' d ,

f, for a witch, had ne'

e

r licon oms'd.

To you I OWE that crowds of boys

Worry me with eternal n

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