Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean

Texto completo

(1)

Revenue Statistics

in Latin America

and the Caribbean

(2)

Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean is an annual publication providing accurate, complete and reliable statistics on tax revenues for tax policy. It includes harmonised and internationally comparable data that can be accessed online free of charge. It is a key contribution to the goal of improving domestic resource mobilisation, which supports the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The publication is produced jointly by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, the OECD Development Centre, the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), the Inter-American Centre of Tax Administrations (CIAT) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The seventh edition of Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean, published in March 2018, provides data from 1990 to 2016 for 25 countries (two of which are

OECD members): Argentina, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela. It allows comparison with OECD, African and Asian countries presented in other publications in the Revenue Statistics series. It also presents an average for participating countries which is compared with the OECD average.

.

This document, as well as any data and map included herein, are without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory, to the delimitation of international frontiers and boundaries and to the name of any territory, city or area.

Definitions and classifications

Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean follows the OECD tax classification, whereby taxes are defined as

compulsory, unrequited payments to general government. Taxes are unrequited in the sense that benefits provided by government are not normally in proportion to their payments. Compulsory social security contributions paid to general government are classified as taxes.

Taxes are classified according to their base. The six main categories are: taxes on income and profits; social security contributions;

payroll and workforce taxes; property taxes; goods and services taxes and other taxes.

Further information on definitions and classifications is available in the Interpretative Guide http://oe.cd/classification-taxes-interpretative-guide-oecd

The publication is available at http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean

(3)

REVENUE STATISTICS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

1

TAX RATIOS FOR 2016

The tax-to-GDP ratio is measured as tax revenues, including social security contributions (SSCs) paid to general

government, as a proportion of gross domestic product (GDP). In 2016, the average tax-to-GDP ratio in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region was 22.7%. Tax-to-GDP ratios varied widely between countries, ranging from 12.6% in Guatemala to 41.7% in Cuba. Most countries’ tax-to-GDP ratios were between 17% and 26%. All LAC countries had a tax- to-GDP ratio below the OECD average of 34.3%, except for Cuba.

Between 2015 and 2016, the average LAC tax-to-GDP ratio decreased by 0.3 percentage points, whereas the OECD average tax-to-GDP ratio increased by 0.3 percentage points over the same period. As a result, the gap between the OECD and LAC average tax-to-GDP ratios increased from 10.9 percentage points in 2015 to 11.5 percentage points in 2016.

The decrease in the tax-to-GDP ratio in the LAC region reflects the overall economic environment in the Latin American region, where real GDP growth has been slowing since 2012, and where there has been an absence of structural tax reforms in most countries. This decrease is likely to reverse in future years with the improving

economic climate in 2017 and 2018. In particular, commodity prices are recovering and the LAC region is expected to achieve GDP growth of between 2% and 2.5% in 2018.

Key results

© OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB 2018

Figure 1. Tax-to-GDP ratios (total tax revenue as % of GDP) in LAC countries, 2016

Source: OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB (2018), Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018, http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean 12.6

13.7 14.4

16.1 16.6

17.2 17.5

17.9 19.8

20.4 20.5

21.4 22.2

22.4 22.6 22.7 22.9 23.2

26.0 26.7

27.9 29.6

31.3 32.2 32.2

34.3

41.7

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

Guatemala Dominican Republic Venezuela Peru Panama Mexico Paraguay El Salvador Colombia Chile Ecuador Honduras Costa Rica Bahamas Nicaragua LAC Average Trinidad and Tobago Guyana Bolivia Jamaica Uruguay Belize Argentina Brazil Barbados OECD Average Cuba

%

(4)

TAX-TO-GDP RATIOS SINCE 1990

Between 1990 and 2016, the average tax-to-GDP ratio in LAC countries increased almost continuously from 16.0%

to 22.7%. The main contributors to the increase were value-added taxes (VAT) and taxes on income and profits.

VAT revenue as a percentage of GDP in LAC countries increased by 3.8 percentage points between 1990 and 2016, reaching a similar level to the OECD average (6.3% and 6.7% respectively in 2015). Since 1990, nine out of 25 countries included in this report have introduced a VAT and additional efforts have been made in most countries to improve the mobilisation of VAT revenue (through an increase of VAT rates, expansion of the taxable base and strengthening of the VAT collection system). Revenues from taxes on income and profits increased by 2.2 percentage points over the same period mainly driven by the boom in commodity prices.

Commodity prices continue to be an important driver for tax revenue trends in most LAC countries. The drop in the average LAC tax-to-GDP ratio in 2016 was driven by a decrease of 0.2 percentage points in revenue from income taxes. This decline was largely attributable to a decrease in corporate income tax (CIT) receipts of the same amount.

The decrease in CIT revenue in Trinidad and Tobago by 8.1 percentage points - due to the collapse of the prices of hydrocarbons together with reduced production - has driven the decline in CIT revenue in the LAC region average.

Tax revenues declined in about half of the countries included in this report in 2016. Between 2015 and 2016, 13 countries reported an increase in their tax-to-GDP ratios while twelve recorded a decrease. This represents a large downturn compared with the previous year, when 21 countries experienced an increase between 2014 and 2015 and only four countries recorded a decrease. In 2016, the Bahamas, Belize and Cuba recorded the highest increases (of over 2 percentage points of GDP) while Trinidad and Tobago and Venezuela experienced the largest decreases (of over 6 percentage points).

Figure 2. Changes in tax-to-GDP ratios in LAC countries in 2014-15 and 2015-16 (percentage points of GDP)

Source: OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB (2018), Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018, http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean -10.0

-8.0 -6.0 -4.0 -2.0 0.0 2.0 4.0

Cuba

Bahamas Belize Jamaica Mexico Honduras Uruguay Panama El Salvador OECD Average

Nicaragua Guatemala Brazil

Dominican Republic Chile

LAC Average Costa Rica Paraguay Ecuador Argentina Guyana Colombia Peru

Barbados Bolivia Venezuela

Trinidad and Tobago p.p

change 2016 changes 2015 changes

(5)

TAX STRUCTURES

The average LAC tax mix shifted towards VAT and taxes on income and profits between 1990 and 2016. In 2016, the LAC average tax mix exhibits a relatively high share of revenue from taxes on goods and services, which make up about half of overall tax revenues compared with a third in the OECD (2015 figure). In 2016, there was a further shift in the LAC region towards VAT and away from taxes on income and profits. In 2016, VAT revenue was the principal component of revenue from taxes on goods and services, representing 58% of revenues from this category. At 29.3%

of the total tax revenues, VAT is the biggest source of revenue on average in the LAC region, followed by revenues from taxes on income and profits (27.3%) and from other taxes on goods and services (21.2%).

On average, 43.0% of tax revenues in LAC countries came from taxes on income and profits and SSCs, compared with 60.0% in the OECD in 2015. Within taxes on income and profits, the revenue share of CIT was higher in the LAC region compared to the OECD, meaning that the revenue share of personal income tax (PIT) was low. In 2015, CIT and PIT accounted for 15.9% and 9.5% of total tax revenues respectively, compared with 8.9% and 24.4% in the OECD. Similarly, the average share of SSCs in total tax revenues was about 10 percentage points lower in the LAC region than the OECD average (16.0%

compared with 25.8%).

REVENUE STATISTICS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

3 Figure 3. Tax-to-GDP ratios, LAC and OECD averages, 1990-2016

Figure 4. Tax structure (as % of total tax revenue) in the LAC and OECD regions, 2015

Source: OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB (2018), Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018, http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean

15.9 8.9

9.5 24.4

2.0

0.8

28.6 20.0

21.7

12.4 16.0

25.8 6.3

other taxes

social security contributions other taxes on goods & services value added taxes (VAT) unallocable between PIT and CIT personal income tax (PIT) corporate income tax (CIT)

7.7

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

LAC Average OECD Average

% 0

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40

OECD average

LAC average

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

%

Note: The year of comparison is 2015 as the 2016 data for the OECD average are not available.

Source: OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB (2018), Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018,

http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean

© OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB 2018

(6)

VAT REVENUE RATIOS

In the LAC region, the VAT revenue ratio (VRR) in 2015 ranged from 32% in Mexico to 91% in Bolivia and Paraguay, with an average VRR of 58%. A VRR of 100% suggests no loss of VAT revenue due to exemptions, reduced rates, fraud, evasion or tax planning. The design of VAT partly explains this variation: Mexico has exemptions and a zero-rate for a large number of goods and services whereas Bolivia does not apply any reduced rates and has a broad VAT base. In comparison, the OECD average in 2014 was 56%.

TAX REVENUES BY LEVEL OF GOVERNMENT

For the 15 LAC countries with available sub-national data in 2015, receipts by central governments accounted for more than two-thirds of tax revenues, whereas the corresponding figure for OECD countries was about 60%. The share of sub-national tax revenues as a proportion of total tax revenue was lower than 8% except in Argentina, Brazil and Colombia, where it reached more than 15% of total tax revenue (over 30% in Brazil). These figures reflect that sub-national governments in LAC countries tend to have a relatively narrow range of taxes under their jurisdiction compared to OECD countries.

SPECIAL FEATURES

The Report contains two special features. The first identifies trends in the fiscal revenues from non-renewable natural resources for 12 commodity-exporting countries in the LAC region in 2016 and 2017. These revenues have continued to fall, from 3.5% of GDP in 2015 to 2.3% of GDP in 2016, thereby affecting revenues from CIT, taxes on goods and services, and non-tax revenues. This was driven by decreases in hydrocarbon-related revenues from 5.0% of GDP in 2015 to 3.4% of GDP in 2016 in the 10 countries that levied this type of revenues) as a result of exceptionally weak profits, a contraction in regional production and the gradual decline of crude oil prices. Although key commodity prices increased in 2017, hydrocarbon revenues are projected to dip slightly to 3.3% of GDP in 2017 and mining revenues are projected to remain steady at around 0.4% of GDP.

The second special feature examines income taxes in selected countries in Latin America over the last seven decades. Analysis of country data from 2015 demonstrates that the redistributive impact of PIT in Latin America remains weak compared to its impact in the European Union. This partly reflects a comparatively low PIT collection in the Latin American region. Several factors contribute to the low PIT collection in Latin America, including a gradual reduction of the progressivity of tax systems and relatively high tax evasion rates from the richest taxpayers.

However, in recent years, Latin American countries have undertaken reforms to improve this performance, such as through higher tax rates and an expansion of the tax base.

Figure 5. Fiscal revenues from principal non-renewable natural resources in Latin America and the Caribbean (12 countries), 2010-16

Note: Includes Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Jamaica, Mexico, Peru, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago and excludes Venezuela.

Source: OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB (2018), Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018, http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean

21.2 21.3 22.1 22.9 23.2 24.5 24.1

5.4 6.1 5.9 5.4 5.2 3.5 2.3

0 5 10 15 20 25 30

2010

Non-renewable natural resources revenues (tax and non-tax) Other revenues (tax, non-tax and capital revenues)

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

% of GDP

(7)

REVENUE STATISTICS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

5

l Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean provides tools that have been developed by tax policy makers and adapted for tax policy analysis, such as:

– An annual publication, available in hard copy and on line, that allows for cross country comparison.

– A highly-detailed dataset freely accessible on line.

Compare your country, a free online interactive tool, and other tools for data presentation and analysis.

l Comparability and trustworthiness: a common method for collecting, analysing, aggregating and presenting data across over 80 countries around the world, with data validated by national authorities and regional partners.

l Continuous dialogue: bilateral exchanges and seminars on tax policy and statistics with experts in Latin American and Caribbean countries and regional partners to share experiences and best practices.

Towards harmonised regional statistics

Partnerships

The OECD is an intergovernmental organisation that includes 35 countries and has helped develop global standards, international conventions, agreements and recommendations since 1961 to promote better policies in areas such as governance and the fight against bribery and corruption and to support corporate responsibility, development assistance, global investment and international taxation.

The Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) is one of the five regional commissions of the United Nations. It was founded with the purpose of contributing to the economic development of Latin America, coordinating actions directed towards this end, and reinforcing economic ties among countries and with other nations of the world. The promotion of the region’s social development was later included among its primary objectives. The 33 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean, together with several Asian, European and North American nations that have historical, economic and cultural ties with the region, comprise the 46 Member States of ECLAC.

The Inter-American Centre of Tax Administrations (CIAT) supports the efforts of national governments by promoting the evolution, social acceptance and institutional strengthening of tax administrations, encouraging international cooperation and the exchange of experiences and best practices. CIAT is a non- profit international public organization that provides specialised technical assistance for the modernization and strengthening of tax administrations. Founded in 1967, CIAT currently has 40 member countries and associate member countries from four continents.

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) was founded in 1959.

Its current focus areas include three development challenges – social inclusion and inequality, productivity and innovation, and economic integration – and three cross-cutting issues – gender equality and diversity, climate change and environmental

sustainability; and institutional capacity and the rule of law. The IDB is the leading source of development financing for Latin America and the Caribbean providing loans, grants, and technical assistance;

and conducting extensive research.

© OECD/ECLAC/CIAT/IDB 2018

(8)

For more information on the publication, or to participate in future editions, please see http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the- caribbean or contact RevenueStatistics@oecd.org

Contacts

OECD www.oecd.org/tax/ or www.oecd.org/dev ECLAC www.cepal.org/

CIAT www.ciat.org/

IDB www.iadb.org/

Useful links

@OECDtax

@OECD_Centre

@eclac_un

@ciatorg

@the_IDB

Follow us

Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean is an annual

publication in a global series that includes four publications and an online database: www.oecd.org/tax/tax-policy/revenue-statistics-comparable-tax- revenue-data.htm

A global project

(9)

Estadísticas tributarias en América Latina

y el Caribe

(10)

Estadísticas tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe es una publicación anual que presenta datos detallados comparables sobre los ingresos tributarios para el diseño de la política tributaria. El reporte incluye datos armonizados y comparables a escala internacional que pueden ser accedidos en línea de manera gratuita. La publicación es una contribución clave para la meta de mejorar la movilización de recursos domésticos, la cual forma parte de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS).

La publicación ha sido elaborada conjuntamente por el Centro de Política y

Administración Tributaria de la OCDE, el Centro de Desarrollo de la OCDE, la Comisión Económica de las Naciones Unidas para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), el Centro Interamericano de Administraciones Tributarias (CIAT) y el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID).

La séptima edición de Estadísticas tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe lanzada en Marzo 2018, presenta datos detallados que cubren el período que va de 1990 a 2016, dos de los

cuales son miembros de la OCDE: Argentina, las Bahamas, Barbados, Belice, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panamá, Paraguay, Perú, República Dominicana, Uruguay, Venezuela y Trinidad y Tobago. La publicación permitte la comparación con países de la OCDE, Africa y Asia presentados en otras publicaciones de la serie de Estadísticas Tributarias. También se presenta un promedio para los países participantes que se compara con el promedio de la OCDE.

Tanto este documento como cualquier mapa que se incluya en él no conllevan perjuicio alguno respecto al estatus o la soberanía de cualquier territorio, a la delimitación de fronteras y límites internacionales, ni al nombre de cualquier territorio, ciudad o área.

Definiciones y clasificaciones

Estadísticas tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe sigue la metodología de clasificación tributaria de la OCDE en donde los impuestos se definen como los pagos obligatorios sin contraprestación efectuados al gobierno general. Los impuestos carecen de contraprestación en el sentido que normalmente las contribuciones brindadas por los gobiernos a los contribuyentes no guardan relación directa con los pagos efectuados por estos. Las contribuciones a la seguridad social (CSS) pagadas al gobierno general se clasifican como impuestos.

Los impuestos se clasifican según su base. Las seis principales categorías son: Impuestos sobre la renta, utilidades y ganancias de capital; contribuciones a la seguridad social; impuesto sobre la nómina; impuestos a la propiedad; impuestos a bienes y servicios y otros impuestos.

La guía de interpretación de la OCDE se encuentra disponible para mayor información sobre definiciones y clasificaciones http://oe.cd/clasificacion-impuestos-guia-interpretacion-ocde

La publicación se encuentra disponible en línea en http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean

(11)

ESTADÍSTICAS TRIBUTARIAS EN AMÉRICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE

1

RECAUDACIÓN TRIBUTARIA SOBRE PIB EN 2016

La proporción de recaudación tributaria sobre PIB se mide como los ingresos tributarios, incluyendo las contribuciones a la seguridad social (CSS) pagadas al gobierno general, como proporción del PIB. En 2016, el promedio de recaudación tributaria sobre PIB para la región de América Latina y el Caribe (ALC) fue de 22.7%. Los ratios varian significativamente entre los países, de 12.6% en Guatemala a 41.7% en Cuba. En la mayoría de países la recaudación sobre PIB oscila entre el 17% y el 26%. Todos los países de ALC, excepto Cuba, tuvieron una relación de ingresos tributarios con respecto al PIB inferior al promedio de 34.3% de la OCDE.

Entre 2015 y 2016, la recaudación tributaria como proporción del PIB en ALC disminuyó en 0.3 puntos porcentuales, mientras que el promedio de la OCDE aumentó en 0.3 puntos porcentuales durante el mismo período. Esto tuvo como resultado un aumento de la brecha entre los promedios de los ratios del recaudación tributaria con respecto al PIB de la OCDE y de ALC, pasando de 10.9 puntos porcentuales en 2015 a 11.5 puntos porcentuales en 2016.

La disminución en la relación impuestos con respecto al PIB en la región de ALC refleja el entorno económico general de la región de América Latina, donde el crecimiento real del PIB se ha desacelerado en la mayoría de los países desde 2012 y donde ha habido una ausencia de reformas tributarias estructurales. Es probable que esta disminución se revierta en los próximos años con la mejora del clima económico en 2017 y 2018. Los precios de las materias primas se están recuperando y se espera que la región ALC alcance un crecimiento del PIB de entre 2% y 2.5% en 2018.

Principales resultados

Gráfico 1. Relación de ingresos tributarios y el PIB (Ingresos tributarios totales como % del PIB) en los países ALC, 2016

Fuente: OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID (2018), Estadísticas Tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe 2018. http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean 12.6

13.7 14.4

16.1 16.6

17.2 17.5

17.9 19.8

20.4 20.5

21.4 22.2

22.4 22.6 22.7 22.9 23.2

26.0 26.7

27.9 29.6

31.3 32.2 32.2

34.3

41.7

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

Guatemala República Dominica Venezuela Perú Panamá México Paraguay El Salvador Colombia Chile Ecuador Honduras Costa Rica Bahamas Nicaragua Promedio ALC Trinidad y Tobago Guyana Bolivia Jamaica Uruguay Belice Argentina Brasil Barbados Promedio OCDE Cuba

%

© OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID 2018

(12)

PROPORCIONES DE RECAUDACIÓN TRIBUTARIA SOBRE PIB DESDE 1990

Entre 1990 y 2016, los ingresos tributarios como proporción del PIB en los países de ALC aumentaron casi continuamente, pasando del 16.0% al 22.7%. Los principales contribuyentes al aumento fueron el IVA y los impuestos sobre la renta y utilidades. En los países de la región de ALC, los ingresos del IVA como porcentaje del PIB aumentaron de 3.8 puntos porcentuales entre 1990 y 2016, alcanzando un nivel similar al promedio de la OCDE (6.3% y 6.7% respectivamente en 2015).

Desde 1990, nueve de los 25 países cubiertos en este informe introdujeron el IVA y se realizaron esfuerzos adicionales en la mayoría de los países para mejorar la movilización de los ingresos del IVA (a través del aumento de las tasas del IVA, la ampliación de la base imponible y el fortalecimiento del sistema de recaudación del IVA). Los ingresos provenientes de los impuestos sobre la renta, utilidades y las ganancias aumentaron de 2.2 puntos porcentuales durante el mismo período, principalmente impulsados por el auge de los precios de las materias primas.

Los precios de las materias primas siguen siendo un importante motor para las tendencias de los ingresos fiscales en la mayoría de los países de ALC. La caída en el promedio de los impuestos con respecto al PIB de ALC en 2016 fue impulsada por una disminución de 0.2 puntos porcentuales en los ingresos por impuestos a las ganancias. Esta disminución se explica por una disminución en los ingresos provenientes de los impuestos sobre la renta de empresas de la misma cantidad.

La disminución de los ingresos provenientes de los impuestos a la renta a las sociedades en Trinidad y Tobago de 8.1 puntos porcentuales, debido al colapso de los precios de hidrocarburos junto a una menor producción, ha impulsado la disminución de los ingresos provenientes de los impuestos a la renta de las sociedades promedio de la región ALC.

En 2016, los ingresos tributarios como proporción del PIB disminuyeron en aproximadamente la mitad de los países analizados de este informe. Entre 2015 y 2016, 13 países reportaron un aumento en sus tasas de recaudación tributaria con respeto al PIB, mientras que 12 registraron una disminución. Esto representa un cambio en comparación con el año anterior, cuando 21 países experimentaron un aumento entre 2014 y 2015 y solo cuatro países registraron una disminución. En 2016, las Bahamas, Belice y Cuba registraron los mayores incrementos (más de 2 puntos porcentuales del PIB), mientras que Trinidad y Tobago y Venezuela experimentaron los mayores descensos (más de 6 puntos porcentuales).

Gráfico 2. Cambios en 2014-15 y 2015-16 de los ratios de ingresos tributarios con respecto al PIB en los países ALC (puntos porcentuales del PIB).

Fuente: OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID (2018), Estadísticas Tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe 2018. http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean -10.0

-8.0 -6.0 -4.0 -2.0 0.0 2.0 4.0

Cuba

Bahamas Belice Jamaica MéxicoHonduras Uruguay Panamá El Salvador Promedio OCDE

Nicaragua Guatemala Brasil

República Dominicana Chile

Promedio ALC

Costa Rica Paraguay Ecuador Argentina Guyana Colombia Perú

Barbados Bolivia Venezuela Trinidad y Tobago puntos percentuales

Cambios en 2016 Cambios en 2015

(13)

ESTADÍSTICAS TRIBUTARIAS EN AMÉRICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE

3

ESTRUCTURAS TRIBUTARIAS

En ALC, la participación en la estructura tributaria (tax mix) del IVA y de los impuestos sobre la renta aumentó entre 1990 y 2016. En 2016, el promedio del tax mix de ALC tuvo una proporción relativamente alta de ingresos de impuestos sobre bienes y servicios, que representaron aproximadamente la mitad de los ingresos fiscales generales comparado con un tercio en la OCDE (cifra de 2015). En 2016, el aumento de la proporción del IVA y de los impuestos sobre la renta, utilidades y ganancias, se acentuó en la región de ALC. En 2016, los ingresos provenientes del IVA fueron el principal componente de los ingresos provenientes de las contribuciones tributarias sobre bienes y servicios, ya que representaron el 58% de los ingresos de esta categoría. Con un 29.3% de los ingresos tributarios

totales, el IVA fue la mayor fuente de ingresos en promedio en la región ALC, seguido por los ingresos provenientes de los impuestos a la renta, utilidades y las ganancias (27.3%) y de otros impuestos sobre bienes y servicios (21.2%).

En promedio, en 2015 el 43% de todos los ingresos tributarios en los países ALC provino de impuestos sobre la renta y utilidades y las CSS, en comparación con el 60%

en la OCDE. La proporción del impuesto sobre la renta de sociedades, dentro de la categoría de impuestos sobre la renta y utilidades, fue más alta en la región ALC que en la OCDE, lo que significa que la participación del impuesto sobre la renta de personas físicas en los ingresos del impuesto a la renta fue baja. En 2015, la proporción de los ingresos del impuesto sobre la renta de sociedades y sobre personas físicas fue respectivamente de 15.9% y de 9.5%

del recaudación tributaria total comparada con 8.9% y 24.4% en la OCDE. De igual forma, las CSS como proporción de los ingresos tributarios totales fueron más baja de 10 puntos porcentuales que el promedio de la OCDE (16.0%

comparado con 25.8%).

Gráfico 3. Brechas en el recaudación tributaria como proporción del PIB, promedios ALC y OCDE 1990 – 2016

Gráfico 4. Estructura impositiva (como porcentaje de la recaudación total) en ALC y en la OCDE, 2015

Fuente: OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID (2018), Estadísticas Tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe 2018. http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean

15.9 8.9

9.5 24.4

2.0

0.8

28.6 20.0

21.7

12.4 16.0

25.8

6.3 7.7

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

%

Promedio ALC Promedio OCDE

otros impuestos 2000 contribuciones a la seguridad social Otros impuestos sobre los bienes y servicios impuestos sobre el valor agregado

no clasificables entre impuestos sobre la renta de personas físicas y de sociedades

impuestos sobre la renta y utilidades de sociedades impuestos sobre la renta y utilidades de personas físicas

Nota: El año de comparación es 2015 ya que los datos de 2016 para el promedio de la OCDE no estaban disponibles.

Fuente: OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID (2018), Estadísticas Tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe 2018.

http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean 0

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40

Promedio OCDE

Promedio ALC

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

%

© OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID 2018

(14)

RATIO DE RECAUDACIÓN DEL IVA

En América Latina y el Caribe, el ratio de recaudación del IVA (VRR por sus siglas en inglés) en 2015 varió desde 32% en México hasta 91% en Bolivia y Paraguay, con un VRR promedio de 58%. Un VRR del 100% sugiere que no hay perdidas en la recaudación del IVA debido a exenciones, tasas reducidas, fraude, evasión o planificación fiscal. El diseño del IVA explica parcialmente estas diferencias: México tiene exenciones y una tasa cero del IVA para un número importante de bienes y servicios, mientras que Bolivia no aplica tasas reducidas y tiene una base amplia. En comparación, el promedio de la OCDE en 2014 fue del 56%.

INGRESOS TRIBUTARIOS POR NIVELES DE GOBIERNO

Para los 15 países de ALC con datos subnacionales disponibles en 2015, los ingresos tributarios a nivel del gobierno central constituyen dos tercios o más del recaudación total. El monto correspondiente en países de la OCDE es de 60%. Los ingresos tributarios subnacionales, como proporción de los ingresos totales, fueron menores al 8% excepto en Argentina, Brasil y Colombia, países en los cuales alcanzaron mas del 15% del recaudación total (30% en el caso de Brasil). Estas cifras demuestran que los gobiernos subnacionales en ALC tienden a contar con un escaso número de impuestos bajo su jurisdicción en comparación con lo observado en los países miembros de la OCDE.

SECCIONES ESPECIALES

El Informe contiene dos secciones especiales. La primera identifica tendencias en los ingresos fiscales provenientes de recursos naturales no renovables de 12 países exportadores de materias primas en la región de ALC en 2016 y 2017. Estos ingresos han seguido disminuyendo, pasando del 3.5% del PIB en 2015 al 2.3% del PIB en 2016, lo que también afecta los ingresos sobre la renta de empresas y utilidades, los impuestos sobre los bienes y servicios y los ingresos no tributarios. Esto fue impulsado por la disminución de los ingresos relacionados con los hidrocarburos (del 5.0% del PIB en 2015 al 3.4% del PIB en 2016 en los 10 países que recaudaron este tipo de impuestos) como resultado de ganancias excepcionalmente bajas, de una contracción de la producción regional y de la disminución gradual de los precios del petróleo crudo. Aunque los precios de las materias primas claves han aumentado en 2017, se prevé que los ingresos provenientes de hidrocarburos bajen ligeramente hasta llegar al 3.3%

del PIB en 2017 y se prevé que los ingresos provenientes de la minería se mantengan estables en torno al 0.4% del PIB.

La segunda sección especial examina los impuestos directos sobre la renta en países seleccionados de América Latina en las últimas siete décadas. El análisis de datos de países de 2015 demuestra que el impacto redistributivo de los impuestos sobre la renta de personas en América Latina sigue siendo débil en comparación con su impacto en la Unión Europea. Esto refleja en parte una recaudación tributaria de impuestos sobre la renta de personas físicas comparativamente baja en la región de América Latina. Varios factores contribuyen a la baja recaudación tributaria de los impuestos sobre la renta de personas físicas en América Latina, lo que incluye una reducción gradual de la progresividad de los sistemas impositivos y tasas de evasión fiscal relativamente altas de los contribuyentes más ricos. Sin embargo, en los últimos años, los países de América Latina han emprendido reformas para mejorar este sistema, tales como tasas más altas y una expansión de la base tributaria.

Gráfico 5. Ingresos seleccionados provenientes de materias primas no renovables en 12 economias de América Latina, 2010-16

Nota: Incluye Argentina, Bolivia , Brasil, Chile, Colombia, República Dominicana, Ecuador, Jamaica, México, Perú, Surinam y Trinidad y Tobago y excluye a Venezuela.

Fuente: OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID (2018), Estadísticas Tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe 2018. http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-and-the-caribbean

21.2 21.3 22.1 22.9 23.2 24.5 24.1

5.4 6.1 5.9 5.4 5.2 3.5 2.3

0 5 10 15 20 25 30

2010

Ingresos provenientes de recursos naturales no renovables (tributarios y no tributarios) Otros ingresos (otros ingresos tributarios y no tributarios, de capital)

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

% del PIB

(15)

5 ESTADÍSTICAS TRIBUTARIAS EN AMÉRICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE

lEstadísticas tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe provee herramientas que han sido desarrolladas por hacedores de políticas y adaptadas para el análisis de políticas, como:

– Publicación anual disponible en copia física o en línea: Estadísticas tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe que permite la comparación entre países

– Una base de datos altamente detallada accesible gratuitamente en línea – Comparativo de países, una herramienta interactiva en línea y gratuita

lComparabilidad y fiabilidad: un método común para colectar, analizar, agregar y presentar datos para más de 80 países a nivel mundial, con data validada por las autoridades nacionales y los socios regionales.

lDiálogo continuo: intercambios bilaterales y seminarios en política tributaria con expertos de América Latina y el Caribe así como de los socios regionales para comparar experiencias y buenas prácticas.

Hacia estadísticas regionales armonizadas

Asociaciones

Fundada en 1961, la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económicos (OCDE) agrupa a 35 países miembros y su misión es promover políticas que mejoren el bienestar económico y social de las personas alrededor del mundo. La OCDE ofrece un foro donde los gobiernos puedan trabajar conjuntamente para compartir experiencias y buscar soluciones a los problemas comunes. La OCDE busca entender que es lo que conduce al cambio económico, social y ambiental.

La Comisión Económica para América Latina (CEPAL) es una de las cinco comisiones regionales de las Naciones Unidas. Se fundó para contribuir al desarrollo económico de América Latina, coordinar las acciones encaminadas a su promoción y reforzar las relaciones económicas de los países entre sí y con las demás naciones del mundo. Posteriormente, su labor se amplió a los países del Caribe y se incorporó el objetivo de promover el desarrollo social. Los 33 países de América Latina y el Caribe son miembros de la CEPAL, junto con algunas naciones de América del Norte, Europa y Asia que mantienen vínculos históricos, económicos y culturales con la región.

En el Centro Interamericano de Administraciones Tributarias (CIAT) apoyan el esfuerzo de los gobiernos nacionales promoviendo la evolución, aceptación social y el fortalecimiento institucional de las administraciones tributarias; fomentando la cooperación internacional y las acciones conjuntas en materia de intercambio de experiencias y mejores prácticas . CIAT es un organismo internacional público, sin fines de lucro que provee asistencia técnica especializada para la actualización y modernización de las administraciones tributarias. Desde su creación en 1967 y hasta el momento, el CIAT agrupa a 40 países miembros y países miembros asociados, en cuatro continentes.

El Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) fue creado en 1959 desarrollo para América Latina y el Caribe. El BID es la principal fuente de financiamiento para el desarrollo para América Latina y el Caribe. Los temas actuales prioritarios para el Banco incluyen tres retos de desarrollo – inclusión social y e igualdad, productividad e innovación e integración económica – y tres temas transversales – igualdad de género, cambio climático y sostenibilidad ambiental, y capacidad institucional y estado derecho.

© OCDE/CEPAL/CIAT/BID 2018

(16)

Para mayor información sobre la publicación o como participar en futuras ediciones por favor visite: http://oe.cd/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america- and-the-caribbean o contáctenos vía correo: RevenueStatistics@oecd.org

Contactos

OCDE www.oecd.org/tax/ or www.oecd.org/dev CEPAL www.cepal.org/

CIAT www.ciat.org/

BID www.iadb.org/

Enlaces útiles

@OECDtax

@OECD_Centre

@eclac_un

@ciatorg

@the_IDB

Síguenos

Estadísticas tributarias en América Latina y el Caribe es una publicación anual dentro de unas series globales que incluyen 4 publicaciones y bases de datos en línea: www.oecd.org/tax/tax-policy/revenue-statistics-comparable-tax- revenue-data.htm

Un proyecto global

Figure

Actualización...

Referencias

Actualización...

Related subjects :