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UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE NUEVO LEON Secretaría Académica

Texto

INGLES, PRIMERA EDICION 1995

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AUTHORS

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This text was developed in a project sponsored by

Secretaría

Académica

of The Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León.

The material was written by the members of the English Committe:

Evaristo Munguía Panti

Preparatoria No. 2

Rubén Cepeda Montes

Preparatoria No. 9

Sara Alicia Ancira Aréchiga

Preparatoria No. 15

María de Jesús Puente Grunerht

Preparatoria No. 16

Laura Esthela García Alvarez Preparatoria No. 23

(4)

Contents

Unit

tmy

4

Topic

P a g e

• r - ?« I-

1

; '

The Arts

Space Technology

29

Me and Them

66

Love

93

The Future

111

Achievements

139

History

165

Trends

191

v. "{

(5)

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

p. 2 "High-Tech Art Materials," The Artist Magazine, April 1994.

p. 5 Dart A. K. ESL Grammar Workbooks, Prentice Hall. Inc.

p. 8 T h e Art of Making Videos," American Artist, August 1994.

p. 14 "Features," ARTnews, April 1994.

p. 16 T h e Kahlo Cult," ARTnews, April 1994.

p. 21 Ibidem.

p. 2 3 "Digital Museums, Now," Art & Antiques, August 1994.

p. 25 "Shows & Exhibitions," Art & Antiques, August 1994.

p. 30 "Going to the Moon," Popular Science Magazine, April 1994.

p. 37 American English Webster Dictionary, 1988.

p. 40 T h e Moon: Luna Landers," Popular Science Magazine,

February 1994.

p. 46 American English Webster Dictionary, 1988.

p. 50 Telescope for Hire," Popular Science Magazine, February

1994.

p. 58 "Making Space Affordable," Popular Science Magazine, May

1994.

p. 61 American English Webster Dictionary, 1988.

p. 62 Ibidem.

p. 67 "Overalls,", The New York Times, May

9.

1994.

p. 74 Tracey Gold," Shape, May

1993.

p. 78 "Stopping the Biological Clock and an Index," Newsweek

The International Newsmagazine, February 1994.

P- 79 , Ibidem.

P- 80 Ibidem.

P

'

8 5

X S b e "

h e r k i c k s

" Seventeen Magazine.

P- 86 Ibidem.

P

'

9 5

l

e

h n H T S ( e I

0

^

h

p

e r e 1 h a V e n e v e r

b e l l e d . "

nayward (ed). The Penguin Book of English Verse

P. 102 " H g - T e c h Romance," Seventeen Magazine. February

P

'

1 1 2

^ y M u K S "

6

°

f V l

°

l e n C e

"

T h e F u t u r i s t

Magazine.

P

'

1 1 9

2 3 S K S S j S S T

a P r 0 f

— " Futurist

P

'

1 2 6

^ A u S f K

^

F U t U r e

"

T h e

Magazine.

p 1 3 2

¡

M

s

s

^

^

^

w

^

P- 136 American English Webster Dictionary, 1988.

P- 143 "What makes a great school," Life, October 1994.

P. 149 -How to Land a Job." Psychology Today,

September/October

P- 157 Talk about Initiative!," TEEN Magazine, October 1994

P

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1 6 2

S

S

r

- Bounds," Business

P

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1 6 6

£°ok

e

,"

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P U l a r A a

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^ ^ w York; Harmony

P 1 7 5

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(6)

p. 180 "Corn Flakes," Popular American Ritual, New York.

; 1

Harmony Books.

p. 187 "Jeans," Popular American Ritual, New York, Harmony

Books.

p. 192 "China: Suspicions of Drugs Use Confirmed ," Newsweek.

December 1994.

p. 192 "Moby Dick," Herman Melville, Signet Classic, 1980.

5

p. 192 "Better than Store-Bought," Seventeen Magazine, February

1992

v J

p. 192 "Newsmakers, Newsweek," December 1994.

i' *

.

• - p. 1Ö2 "Basic Logic", Raymond McCall, (2nd ed.) Barnes «Si Noble,

p. 199 "Moby Dick," Herman Melville, Signet Classic. 1980.

p. 200 "Headlines,, USA Today, October 10. 1994.

Vi

p. 201 Ibidem.

p. 202 "Headlines," USA Today> October 10. 1994.

p. 203 "Today Debate," USA Today/October 10. 1994.

p. 204 Ibidem.

p. 209 "Hot Dates in South African History." Mademoiselle

Magazine September 1994.

p. 210 ."New Victim in South Africa: The Ecology." The News.

October 6, 1994.

p. 212 "South Africa." Mademoiselle Magazine, September. 1994.

p. 216 Swiss Army watch publicity. ' '

:

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p. 217 Jaeger-LeCoultre watch publicity.

viä

P h o t o s / D r a w ^ i g s

P. 2 The Artist's Magazine April 1994.

n

99

American Artist, August 1994.

n

97

nf

1

^ AnUques, August 1994.

£ 28 S d e m

n

' ^

^

P

°

S t C a r d B

° °

k

'

G

y

P- 29 El Norte, February 20, 1995

P- 32 Astronomy news, September 1994.

n 4 Q Astronomy news, September 1994

n I t Astronomy news, September 1994.

n

rq

Astronomy news, September 1994.

n cq

Astronomy news, September 1994

p. oy Astronomy news, September

1994

P- b5 Revista Contenido, December 1994

P. do . Case Doug. English puzzles 3, 1991

Wright, Andrew, 1000, Pictures for

Teachers

to Copy, Collins.

P. 67 The New York Times, Sunday, May 9, 1994.

n 79 Seventeen Magazine, August 1990.

P- 72 Shape, May 1993.

P- 73 Shape, May 1993.

P- 77 Shape, May 1993.

p. 79 Newsweek Magazine, February 11, 1994

n 1 no Seventeen Magazine, Februaiy 1992.

« i Vn

Seventeen Magazine, February 1992.

P-

110

Artnews, April 1994.

D J14

Newsweek Magazine. Februaiy 11, 1994.

p. 114 El Norte. Februaiy 14, 1995

p. 117 El Norte, Februaiy 14.

1995.

P- J*

8

Business letter for all.' 1991

P- 127 El Norte, February 6, 1995

P. 128 Ibidem.

P. 131 Ibidem.

£* }

qq

Newsweek Magazine, Januarv 1995.

p. icS« Morning News, 1995.

p. 139 Super World Circle,

December 1994

Wo Search-A-Word puzzles, July

1994

p. 148 Watcyn-Jones, Peter Start Testing

your

vocabulary, Penguin, 1982.

p. 159 Super World Circle, December 1994

P- 174 Howard Williams Deirdre and Herd

p. 178 S i d e m ^ ^ ^ ^

E n g l i s h 1 9 9 0

-p. 186 Shape Magazine, 1993.

(7)

P r e s e n t a t i o n

T h i s course contains materials,to«help you mantain progress i n your language learning, and to f i n d solutions to problems in your academic and professional life. It w i l l help you to acquire strategies and skills necessary for extracting information f r o m texts written in English.

v . < >'

There are a lot of practical activities in w h i c h understanding f r i t t e * ! English is a necessity, and perhaps you have already had experience of some of them.

For example:

1 Understanding the instructions of modern video-games, such as: Super-Nintendo, Segâ-Genesis, pocket games, etc.

2 Understanding manuals of P C Programs.

3 Understanding instructions to install and use imported articles.

4 Reading the labels on imported products.

5 Understanding songs.

These are only a few examples in w h i c h we can see how useful it is to know English, and it is clear that the most important of all is having access to the vast amount of information available only in this language.

W e hope that the material fulfills your expectations at thç same time offer you new experiences which w i l l increase your knowledge and develop the strategies and skills for learning English.

HJMIT OUBJUECTHVES

U N I T 1

THE ARTS

GOALS:

CONTENT:

Read a minimum of 4 texts inferring ideas from them

Identify the use of Present Perfect Tense in at least 10 sentences Use the Past Participle verbs in 5 sentences.

Inferring ideas and reading between lines. Past Participle verbs.

V O C A B U L A R Y :

Verbs: Nouns Adjectives: use paint work invest enjoy stage play attach tell hang have make buy gadget curator available superfluous

used used painted palmed worked worked invested invested enjoyed onjoyed staged staged played played attached attached told told hung hung had had made made bought bought

sell sold

SGid

creep ere- crept

say said

said

become became become

come came come

run ran

run

go went gone ,

write wrote

written

see saw

seen

be (is/are) was/ we re

bien

speak spoke spoken

read read read

put

put put read

put

cut cut cm

marketing passerby masterpiece handicapped high-tech auction appeal goddess pot fake grunge item clay tool huge set tide ironic

U N I T 2

SPACE

TECHNOLOGY

OBJECTIVES: The learner will be able to use the dictionary correctly after analyzing each pan of it.

GOALS: Read a minimum of 4 texts with the help of the dictionary

Identify the Present Perfect Passive Voice in the fin» text and practice it in other exercises.

CONTENT: Present Perfect Passive Voice structure. Dictionary Skills material Prefixes UH- de- and suffixes -able -ize in context.

V O C A B U L A R Y :

Verbs: counterpart network launch support download research measurement demythologize bring back unsurmountablc

tongue skygazer device goal design chunk dial envision shot concern wonder appear

(8)

U N I T 3

ME AND THEM

OBJECTIVES: The learner will be able to identify and use exemplification expressions in order to strengthen self-confidence in his/her ability to understand long texts in English.

GOALS: Read a minimum of 3 texts. Identify and use exemplification expressions in a given text. Use superiority and inferiority comparatives appropriately in 1Q sentences. Write 2 descriptions including physical or personal characteristics. Identify and mine at least 10 ctothing items. Write a description of his/her personal traits.

CONTENT: Main idea.

Modals: can may might would must should

VOCABULARY:

Verbs: start wear follow make grow up publish ! spend hide buy enjoy describe compare

t Nouns: nightmare carpenter clothes male

boyfriend suspenders tuxedo female junior high high school pocket style

Adjectives: attractive handsome girlish fashionable

brainy golden slim fat

U N I T 4

LOVE

call try

dance

kill fight

OBJECTIVES: The learner will recognize the cause-effect relationship in a given text; identify and use conditional clauses (1st. conditional) and vocabulary related to love and compound words with new and -made.

GOALS: Read 2 texts. Write a love message/poem and a magazine text.

CONTENT: Cause-effect (One reason why, as a result, as a consequence, consequently, so, since, as, because)

First conditional clauses {¡flrma plays, we will win this game)

VOCABULARY:

Verbs: close compel kiss enclose shut love unclose feel joy

Nouns: girlfriend moonlight gestures candlelight husband wishes

boyfriend wife firelight gifts Compound: Expressions:

new-bom new-found

blush to the roots of your hair hold hands

walk aim in arm

look into each other's eye

self-made home-made tailor-made hand-made

Xll

OBJECTIVES: THe learner will be able to guess meaning torn context after analyzing different s

GOALS: Read 4 texts guessing meaning when possible. Identify the Conditional Future context

CONTENT: Conditional Future structure.

Practice material for guessing meaning. Writing skill and oral practice materials.

structures, structure in VOCABULARY: Nouns and Verbs: challenge application pollution instability hold back remark neighborhood benchmark fate struggle endure manager employee playwright claim doubt health source scarcity agree view flood store commit growth salary lifestyle shortage employer shrimp misbehave luck hire guess sweep reason satisfy pleasant survival specialty cook means dam sew&ge drought fountain debt hint trip

OBJECTIVES: The learner will be able to get the main ideas of a paragraph exploiting his/her previous knowledge in order to increase his/her ability for reading comprehension.

GOALS:

CONTENT:

Read a minimum of 4 texts. Identify the main ideas. Use the auxiliary had + Past Participle in a normal chronological sequence in 5 stories.

Main ideas. Past Perfect Tense.

VOCABULARY:

Verbs: thought realized worth bunien left tme agree went forgotten entered shout own made took wrote drove answered competed wanted called stolen found looked got

(9)

U N I T 7

HISTORY

OBJECTIVES: The learner will identify the main ideas of a text, extracting salient points to summarize a text.

COALS: Read a minimum of 4 texts.

Summarize information from texts and write one summary.

Identify and write 10 passive sentences in Present and Past Perfect.

CONTENT: Summarizing. Prediction and inference.

Present and Past Perfect Passive. Collocation.

VOCABULARY:

Verbs: do make tell say ride drive

Nouns: beverage franchise fellowship beret kilt peddler

Adjectives: run-down interested in kind to rotten enthusiastic about apoplectic rough <: sticky different from keen on sour •< acrid

U N I T S T R E N D S _ OBJECTIVES: Theleamerwill be able to detect the writer's intention and attitude, and to judge the communicative

value of a text discriminating between facts and opinions.

GOALS: Read aminimumof 6 texts to distinguish facts from opinions and to understand the communicative intention of the author in order to acquire a critical reading ability. Identify and use the structure of used to in 5 sentences. Deduce the meaning of vocabulary in context, at least in 2 texts.

CONTENT: Prejudice and bias, and fact vs opinion in texts. Expressing habits (used to...)

Suffixes -merit, •siort, -Hon.

VOCABULARY:

Verbs: used to to punish to amuse to slant

Nouns: detachment sympathy concern policy legacy accuracy casualties commitment gossip bias

SSM» V ¥ SS«>* •:• f xms S * VHS* * i -xïft» »

IKKHGLLAK VERBS COMMONLY USED

Base Form

h e h e c o m c b e g i n h e ii d

: b l o w

b r e a k ; b r i n g ::;: b u i l d

:: b u y

c a t c h c h o o s e : c o m e

COS!

d e a l d o d r a w d r i n k d r i v e e a t f a l l f e e d i c c l H g h t : find

I fiy

l o r g e t g e t % g i v e

g o g r o w I h a v e

h e a r h i d e s h i t h o l d

'f. h u r l k e e p

, k n o w | l e a d S l e a v e

let

t: l i e ( t o r e c l i n e )

l i e ( n o t t o toll t h e t r u t h ) l o s e

m a k e m e a n m e e i p a y p i n r e a d r i d e r i n g r i s e r u n s a y s e e I s e l l

s e n d s e t s h o w s h ri n k si n g s i n k •> si t

s l e e p | s p e a k

s p e n d

Si spin

is s p l i t s p r e a d g s p r i n g % s t a n d ; s t e a l s s w i m S t a k e

Z t e a c h :: t e l l

t h i n k t h r o w

| u n d e r s t a n d * w a k e

w e a r w i n w i t h d r a w

:> . w r i t c

Past Form w a s b e c a m e b e g a n b e n t b l e w b r o k e b r o u g h t b u i l t b o u g h t c a u g h t c h o s e c a m e c o s t d e a l t d i d

d r e w

d r a n k d r o v e a t e f e l l f e d f e l t 1 o u g h t f o u n d f l e w f o r g o t g o t g i v e w e n t g r e w h a d h e a r d h i d h i t h e l d h u r t k e p t k n e w l e d l e f t let

l a y ( t o r e c l i n e )

l i e d ( n o t t o t e l l t h e t r u t h ) l o s t

m a d e m e a n t m e t p a i d p u t

r e a d ( " p r o n o u n c e d " r e d " ) r o d e

r a n g r o s e r a n s a i d s a w s o l d s e n t SCI s h o w e d

s h r a n k , s h r u n k s a n g

s a n k s u n k s a t

s l e p t s p o k e s p e n t s p u n s p l i t s p r e a d

s p r a n g , s p r u n g s t o o d

s t o l e s w a m t o o k t a u g h t t o l d t h o u g h t t h r e w u n d e r s t o o d w o k e , w a k e d w o r e

w o n w i t h d r e w w r o t e

Past Participle b e e n

b e c o m e b e g u n b e n t b l o w n b r o k e n b r o u g h t b u i l t b o u g h t c a u g h t c h o s e n c o m e c o s t d e a l t d o n e d r a w n d r u n k d r i v e n e a t e n f a l l e n f e d f e l t f o u g h t f o u n d f l o w n

f o r g o t t e n ( B r i t i s h f o r g o t ) g o t t e n

g i v e n ( B r i t i s h g o t ) g o n e

g r o w n h a d h e a r d h i d d e n h i t h e l d h u r t k e p t k n o w n l e d l e f t l e t

l a i n ( t o r e c l i n e )

l i e d ( n o t t o t e l l t h e t r u t h ) l o s t

m a d e m e a n t m e t p a i d p u t

r e a d ( p r o n o u n c e d " r e d " ) r i d d e n

r u n g

ri s e n I r u n

s a i d i s e e n

s o l d s e n t s e t

s h o w n , s h o w e d s h r u n k

s u n g s u n k s a t s l e p t s p o k e n s p e n t

s p u n K s p l i t

s p r e a d

s p r u n g g s t o o d

s t o l e n

s w u m | t a k e n s t a u g h t £ t o l d | t h o u g h t

t h r o w n

u n d e r s t o o d | w a k e n , w a k e d , w o k e

w o r n

w o n f

w i t h d r a w n w r i t t e n

• :•:<&¥•; 5 isSSS : i . <: >• *

(10)

.i . , " =

1 The Arts

Time to read!(i)

Find the last names of the following famous painters:

J Pablo

I

n Frida

1 Rafael

B

J Diego

J Salvador

i Julio

I

I Remedios

I

I Andy

1

(11)

T a s k 1

Read each paragraph as quickly as you can. Then match them with the subheadings.

BY DAVID PYLE

P e r s o n a l digital assistants, a u t o m a t i c | b r e a d m a c h i n e s , e l e c t r i c n o s e - h a i r ; t r i m m e r s . . . T h e tide of gadgetry in the world all around us rages on. But we artist types c o n t i n u e to scrape about w i t h the same b r u s h e s and paints w e ' v e u s e d f o r d e c a d e s , c e n t u r i e s e v e n . W h e r e ' s o u r g a d g i - t r o n i c p r o g r e s s . ' H o w arc we to k e e p up with the cul-ture-at-large w i t h o u t some precocious contraption-ism of our own? H e r e are p r o d u c t s t h a t , at t h e v e r y l e a s t , w i l l allow us to stake a claim to our share of do-thingies and whatchamacallits.

N n w y o u c a n n r a t e a s las; a s v m i fart

llnilk' T h e s e -.kiiiligllt neu;,-relit; gloves h a v e a n e s s e n t i a l a r t - m a k i n g U»o4 attached to each finger A set n d u d t s • four b r u s h e s . ( t w o on each hand) • one palette knife

• one utility blade (watch o u t ' ) • one mini tape dispenser • one graphite leac holder • one charcoal holder • one fingertip color w h e e l

• one m i n i A M - I - M radio w i t h a n t e n n a (batteries not included).

Also available T h e C l i p - O n W r i s t Pal-ette.

T h e phone rings. By the time you've scrambled for a rag, wiped paint from y o u r h a n d s , and s n a p p e d up t h e r e -ceiver, the caller has hung up N e v e r again w i t h the T e l e - b r u s h ! Just press the answer button on the brush ferrule t o c o n n e c t w i t h a c a l l . A n d w i t h the speaker option, there's no need to lift the brush to your mouth.

Available in portable and cellular m o d e l s for u s e w h e n p a i n t i n g i n i ln-g r c a t o u t - o f - d o o r s . W h e n you o r d e i . don't forget to tell us tele-sable or tele hog bristle.

' N e v e r m i s p l a c e a t u b e of paint or .1 brush again! Just slip the elastic Vel-c r o " band »round your painting tools a n d " s t i c k - e m - a l l " t o the m a t c h i n g smock. C a r r y your paints on the shoul ders, your brushes at the waist. You'll be a w a l k i n g art material arsenal1

D o n ' t f o r g e t t o a s k a b o u t tin-" S t i c k - c m - A l l tin-" bandolier and cap' T h i s handy, window s h a d e - s t y l e roll

at-taches to the t o p of any standard-size c a n v a s or w a t e r c o l o r b i o c k . W h e n you're painting in public, this product is g u a r a n t e e d to i m p r e s a a n y nosy pas-serby. Quick as you can say " a w e s o m e a r t i s t s all use a u r e o i m , * ' pull the roll cover over y o u r painting and presto! -you're w o r k i n g on a masterpiece for the I ages! Available in your favorites:

• l n - p r o g r e s s d a Vinci: Mona Lisa. • l n - p r o g r e s s M i c h a e l a n g e l o : Sistine

Ceiling ( d o e s n ' t i n c l u d e The Last Judg-ment).

• l n - p r o g r e s s R o d i n : g r a p h i t e s t u d y for

The Thinker.

• ln-progress Picasso: Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.

During his 12 years in the art materials business. Denver-based David Pyle has seen the best and worst art-related products available.

U THE ARTISTS MAGAZINE

Careful!

5 paragraphs, but only 4 sub-headings.

( ) TELE-BRUSH

T a s k 2 ~

Tick the right completion, according to the meaning in the paragraph.

1 Something which is handy (paragraph 2) is O easily used.

( I hardly used.

• difficult to use.

2 Something which is available (paragraph 2,3,5) is C J hard to obtain,

readily obtained.

• difficult to obtain.

An arsenal (paragraph 4) is

• a n establishment for storing weapons.

Q a qu a n t' t y of something on hand.

C J an English football team.

A set (paragraph 5) is

a

a package of art materials.

a

a group of similar things.

a

a part of a game of tennis.

progress (paragraph 2) is

a

unfinished.

a

finished.

difficult to finish.

Q Choose one of the painters on page 1.

(12)

Skill:

Inferring

(reading between lines)

Ts.sk

According to the paragraphs, tick the completion you think is b e s t . ^ " 1

The articles are written in a O serious tone

D scientific style [ Q humorous way

The tone the author uses in the article is

The gadgets described are

High-Tech art materials are

All these products are

O sweet O scientific j I ironic

a utilitarian u

necessary-u snecessary-uperflnecessary-uonecessary-us

u common products nowadays O easily found in this city

unnecessary rfof,a good artist

j I useless items D useful gadgets

interesting tools

Clearing it up

T a s k 1

Look at this phrase from the text...

"... The same brushes and paints we've used for decades...

This statement implies that:

Artists used brushes and paints before now. Artists use brushes and paints now.

The answer to both questions is yes, so... now

the past y , have used

Now look at these sentences. They all describe activities that began in the past and still

This verb form is called the present perfect, It is formed

by usmg the auxiliary ^ ^ participle of the verb.

1 I have lived in Monterrey since I was born.

2 I have been in High School for 3 semesters.

3 We have studied English since Junior High.

4 But we haven't had an English class for a year.

5 My sister has helped me to keep practicing.

6 She has spoken English all her life.

Task 2

c o ° n e 4t h e S e S e n t Q n C e S a f e n 0 t C 0 r r 6 C t M a r k t h e w r o n9 ones with a $ re-write them

1 The earth has been in existence for millions of years.

2 Latin has been a dead language since the decline of Rome. j — j

3 Israel has been a state since 1948. | — j

islam have been the most important religion in the Middle East for many years. •

5 Buddhism has been a major religion in the Far East for more than two thousand years. Q

6 The Sun has was in the center of our solar system for millions and millions of years. •

7 Washington, D.C.. hasn't been the capital of the United States since 1800. |

3 The Red Cross have been an important international organization since 1864. Q

(13)

Words at work

T a s k

Add the past participles from the box to the other parts of these verbs.

use used paint painted -work -worked . invest invested, enjoy enjoyed, stage staged play played

been crept

m a d e worked

run said

t o kf bought

u s e d gone

painted put

had sold

w r i t t e n hung

read c o m e

g o n e staged

enjoyed played

Invested cut

s p o k e n ' become

tell hang have make buy sell creep say

told hung . had made

b o u g h t ; sold crept said

become became go went come came write wrote run ran see saw

be (is/are) was/were speak spoke

read read put put cut cut

What can you say about the past participle form of each group of verbs9

Time to read! (2)

Answer the following questions.

The Art of Making Videos

by Mel Stabin

What do you expect this text will be about? _ _ _ _ _ _

appeared in American Artist magazine on the page devoted to "Watercolor" These were with the text.

(14)

"

t@xt. U?e information in it to complete the chart on thé nexipage. The phrases you mixed Up on the right of the chart.

ft" '«!' ' • ' i\,. »

$pgf$f technology, iq m riot only enter

tain-hut are valuable tools. Here's how

can make a semi-professional video following a

few ' simple steps,

H O W I M A D E M Y V I D E O

After a year of thinking about making a professional video on watercolpr painting on location, I dqcide4 to produce one during a workshop i conducted on Block i?;kir4, Rhode island.

my friend and student por? Tortoriello is a film director When he offered his services, my response was incediate and enthusiastic. He contacted a capable production ih New York City and put log£ttì|r a budget and schedule. I roughly sketched a story board of iäßw t envisioned the video un

teeing -spontaneously but in a neural, 4ocumentarystyle form -a ^ M p r o j e e t w-as bor-a.

1

i f e P i m t

; After several meetings

the production company, we decided to Hy the video crew from Nenf York to, Block Island on a chartered plane and have them tape a out -Of the week-long •••v^r^^op. Upoq arrival, Don and I

by Mel Stabin t b

». iyt'yfv scouted die island for subject matter*. ''

Although five beautiful spots caught our interest, we settled upon the Souihheast Lighthouse. Mean-while, the workshop participants, who'd all agreed to be in the video, rested back at the hotel after traveling over by ferry.

qjSnep£r.en, and p ;ic : i'or the

• m 0 choreograph ot^jfrnd, a discrete me J|as cjipped to over the 4» su rf, an4,seagu lis. smoothly With little

Day One

i conducted the first day of the workshop with a demonstration, personal i nstruction for the s tudents, and a class critique of the work done. The students' spirits were high, complementing the nice weather, and good humor was plentiful. Knowing that the weather forecast for the week was favorable, Don and I decided to begin production the following day. Later thai evening, over dinner, we discussed last minute concerns about the video, easing my anxieties.

Day Two.

At8:3Q A.M., the four-man video crew -two cameramen, a sound man, and a grip (the person who handles the equipment) -arrived at the Southeast Lighthouse, -r The crew, under Don's direction, began f i l m i n g our beautiful surrounding landscape of flora, fauna, jagged bluffs, and the \ lighthouse in the distance.

After I arrived on location it

*shi|t to rei ground of'

Tfy filling

distraction.

V x ' ' f I

t By 2 P.M., the taping of my instructional painting process was complete. After five more takes of me discussing the joys of painting outdoors, we broke for a late lunch and t a i l e d about the postproduction schedule.

Around 5 P.M.. the crew filmed the closing scene to the video • a close-up of the harbor bathed in afternoon light. Soo&after, Don and I drove th,e crew back to the airport After fou&nore workshop; niled days, we all flew home.

: ' |

t h e Posiproductms Process ^ostproduciicn consists of editing Jip, remove my errors that

f - w T > i i i / J i i r i n n * f « ' r n i n i v T o u n l v

occurrediduring" turning. Thanks to a c a # f u l| y ^HuiiikU colluborai i vc effort. t h e | v i ^ p a n d audio reproduced b e^ t i f t | g f f T h e ^len^d crew was able to a ^ i k e ^ v , instrjjci ion come across as spontaneous and relaxed, the way J

h o & J ^wQuld,.'Ail the video really n c i f c l f e p c itSomi^BSe w^resome

fti

T h e A r t o f M a k i n g V i d e o s

TITLE

Worked out the basic

Edited out errors

Production began

Added music a n d credits

How I made my video

Filmed oral presentation

Designed a budget and schedule

scene

Chose a location

Filmed surrounding background

The Arts"

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V U mr i

£ j Work in small groups.

Writs an advertisement to people interested in helping you to make a video. In

your ad, take into consideration these applicant characteristics: active teenagers,

summer job, hard working, able to travel, student visa.

?

I

i r i ?

' . t i , m

i #

•• '.Thjfi, interview the interested persons. The interview should collect the following

. information: age, availability, experience. You should give this information:

liatign of job, filming schedule I location, payment ($!), etc.

S M i l : Inferring

ideas

Cheok the following Yes or No. Underline in the text the words or sentences that help you to msk§ vdur decisions.

* j; 1 It is possible to make an educational video without any help.

i : ". '.' •V H

Jt Only professionals in communication can make educational videos.

3 t o make a semi-professional video you just point the camera and shoot.

5 The material you shoot is the final version of the video.

6 Mel Stabin, the author, is an imaginative, creative person.

Y e s Ho CHJ C 3

O d

C=3

O

C I S O

CD a

Iff J

Clearing it up

E x a m Í t h e f 0 , l 0 W l n 9 e X 6 r C i S e U S i n 9 V e r b s P-entheses.

Watercolor painting has become (become)

1980's. ~

Since Thursday, the crew

Don

a recognized artwork all over the world since the

— (spend) hours filming the last scene.

. (work) with highly-professional producers.

S

E

S i i ^ e ¿ J ^

( i n d U d e ) C i a S S , C a ! m U S i C in a,t t h e , r v i d e o s s i n c e

they

4 The director

- — ( c h o o s e ) seascope locations for all his videos,

(write) all the basic story lines since I began to work here.

Words at work

Work in t e a m s .

Task 1

understand them, i s , other ¿ ^ o r ^ T a S n a T ^ ^ " d° ™

When y o ^ n i s n e ^ c h ^ . with other teams to see „ you agree, and exp,a,n your reasons.

w a t e r c o l o r surf c r e w

s c e n e r y palette j a g g e d bluffs budget

p a i n t i n g sketch

seagulls schedule

storyboard easel production

GROyp # 1 L . PAINTING

.GROUP # 2

iZZZD

G R O U P # 3

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Answer the following questions:

If you could, what kind of artist would you lik« to be?

Why?

Painter

a

Sculptor

u

Photographer

a

Poet

Author

u

Musician

a

Singer

a

Actor o

Have you ever heard about the following artists? Can you match these columns?

Miguel Angel Buonarroti Octavio Paz

Steven Spielberg William Shakespeare Pablo Picasso

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Rudolph Nureyev

Dancing

Cinema

Painting

Sculpture

Literature

Music

Theater

What kind of painter, musician, etc. would you be?

What would you need to do to become this kind of artist?

What kind of things would you need for your job?

Have you heard of the seven forms of art? Can you mention them?

1 music ' 2

3 4

5

6

7 cinema

Why is "cinema" number 7?

Do you know the names of any of their works9 Ca

(17)

VOLUMI; 93. NUMHIÎR J

F O U N D Ü D I W 2 IW4

Time t o

read! (3)

You have bought the magazine ARTnews. Here is the

126 THE RAHL0 C U U * '

Frida Kahlo. considered marginal when die died in IV5 J. is now j supers/at mid licr paintings command multimillion-dollar pi1, es //..» ,¡,¡1 u happen'' JI 'DD TUL1.Y

134 MYTHS, MAGIC, GRUNGE, A N D G L A M O U R

lunkv artists run iviih high sot ietv. alio native \pacc\ 1 < omm-u ..// .»rev. and government with business Mure artists live ojl then an ilian ten sears <'v>i savs an observer MARY SCIINKIDIM li^KigiH A

139 MEXICO'S TOP 25 COLLECTORS \

A R ' I IK WS interviewed art dealers, am iioneeian historians in t •msidtani'h t rim s, and artists to compile this list <>j Me.\ti <> s It/remost collectors

1 4 0 "CALL IT A MID-UFE CRISIS"

Jeopardizing Ins siucess us a Minimalist, brice Marden took u dramatn nun m the mid-'HQs toward a mare gestural abstraction "I don't know if I in good.'' he says, "but I'm beginning to like the work more and more' PAUL GARDNER

p h o t o g h a m i y _

1 4 4 O U T Of THE GHETTO?

While postmodernism and digital imaging offer a way out of the ghetto" oj traib 11anal photography, those working in the modernist vein arc ctiiurnuing to enrich

the medium P£PE K^RMEUft

150 NOT YOUR TYPICAL SOCIALLY CONCERNED P H O T O G R A P H E R

Sebastian Salgada's images of workers throughout the world present a poi trait of the end of the industrial age CHARLES HAGEN

154 THE LOVED ONES IH THE CASTLE

Since they were teenagers Fran: Joseph and Hans van der Crimen have been col-lecting art. esftecially by Joseph Bcuvs. Now the collection is moving across tin moat and into the castle to a museum of its own \ J O H N D O R ^ B ^ R C X

MEXICO

27 VASARI

"Funny, Really Funny"; Virtual Places; AN Artist at My Table: A Queen for Queens: The Self Enclosed

33 ART MARKET

Collectors' Choices: New York: Case Closed, but Questions Linger: London; The Grandee and Her Chubby Daughter : Stock-halm: A Wanning Trend

41 HATIOH

New York: A Master "E m p i r i c i s t " ; Brook-lyn: -No. My Boy. It s a Ffte Champitre" : Washington. D.C.: Sexist. Racist, or Other-wise Offensive; '0' is for O'Keeffe: Chicago; The City Wasn't Going to Burn; New York: Confrontation on 155th Street

51 INTERNATIONAL

Bremen; * Never Look a Gift Horse in ilir Mouth": Stiro/evo Taking the Place of Annies; I-''"rent e Li\es nf the Frescoes; Redisco<• ned Raphael Maslte; Berlin //> « Wtap

7 1 SPOTLIGHT <

Kinshasha Hulmán Canwill Against the Odds

E I L00K3NG AT ART

Francisco Goya: The Spauisli Royal Family. Warts and All

181 STUDIO

Heather Hutchison: Gravity and Light

LOF BOOKS .

How to Gel Kids ta Lh'L tu u Rembrandt

159 RIYIEWS

New York: Washington. D.C. Boston. Los Angeles: Santa Monna. Beverly Hills. Stm Francisco; Chùago. Santa Fe. Sewnkley. Po : Atlanta; Philadelplna. Memphis. Zurich: Cotogne; Minia li. Paris. LO'HIOII. Rome: Madrid; Santiago; Sim kholni

190 PERSPECTIV!

Itow l)iiclianii> Rode the Flevaii» s

COVER: F n d i with (Wsed Anns .um Kinysí

1942-l.t Oßernard Silheiwm Contiez ('./</.<, Stell» ev Calh i \ St. •> > ,.»A..,,- / V i

On what pages would you expect to find an answer to the following questions?

1 Are there any books on art and artists for children?

- — — —

2 What is new in the art world in Mexico? _ _ _

Who's who in Mexico about art collection?

What does Frida Kahlo and women's liberation in the 70's have in common9

How has a changing world been photographed?

Read the following text as quickly as you can and tick the right completion.

The text is about:

O Art marketing through the selling of T-shirts, clocks pins posters, etc. '

O How a female painter has attracted a big group of followers for the last two decades.

Q H o w , i f e a n d a rtistic works of an unkown artist become famous all around the world because of a bus accident.

O T h e members of a religion founded by a mexican artist.

The text probably comes from:

a weekly newspaper •

a specialized magazine I 1

an art book ' . | |

. . . ^rnm^

(18)

A R T N E W S

M E X I C O

A p r i l I

THE

KAHLO CULT

B Y J U D D T U L L Y

• i.;M'.e ' '-111• i v()(l

>-.III o l d e i a " L I i d a S a l a d

(J ; i d i c c h 1 0 . o h \ v s . a v o

c a d o . a n d o i h e r \ cue!., b i o s ) LL-.O IICO V l e v l o l k - . u I d e c o r is k . v d o

" C ' a s a A / u ! . " I i i d a K a h l o s n o u

-an«.! m u s e u m i n M e x i c o C ' u \

I h e r e a i e p o s t c a i d s a n d I - s h i r t s u>

b u s l o o " W e ' t v i h i n k i n e o l starl-i n g a I n d a k . . n starl-i e starl-i c h a n U starl-i s starl-i n a

> • ' > m p a i i \ w n i l .in s o n " n u m h e i . '

s a y S - C o - o w n c i R i t a H o x a d t i a n

I . t i t l e I n d a s is b u i o n e o u t p o s t

m a n a m o r p h o u s m e r c h a n d i s i n g

e m p i r e t h a t g r i n d s o u t T - s h i r t s ,

earr i n g s . a p earr o n s , c l o c k s , p i n s , c a l e n

-d a r s . p o s t e r s . :;-d p o s t c a r -d s b e a r i n g

K a h l o ' s n o w w o r l d - f a m o u s

im-a g e s . e s p e c i im-a l !> h e r s e l l - p o r t r im-a i t s .

In a d d i t i o n l o t h i s l o o s e I \ o r g a

n i z e d i n d u s i r x d e v o t e d t o p o p u l a r

c u l t u r e , a n u m b e r o f s e r i o u s K a h l o

b i o g r a p h i e s m o s t o f t h e m p r o

l u s e l ) l i l u s t i a t e d - c l o g t h e s h e l v e s

o t b o o k s t o r e s a n d - m u s e u m s h o p s

M a j o r w o r k s h a v e b e e n w r i t t e n ii

S p a n i s h . F i n g l i s h , G e r m a n , F r e n c h

a n d J a p a n e s e T h e r e \s e v e n a

chil-d r e n ' s b i o g i a j h \ o l t h e a r t i s t

I 0 ' ' t S e v e r a l h i g h - | , : o : ' i l e Hoi

i\sm»h! h g i i i e - . n c l u d i n g V L J ' . m u h a w J I\ i. - . e d m / . s oIO M i n i s in I In h o p e s o l !>i i :>• 1 1 1 K a h l o s n i x i n n

s t o r y to the silver screen.

What is it about this strikingly beautiful but tragically handicapped artisl ( s h e suffered a n e a i - f a t a l b u s accident; a teenager in Mexico city in which she was literally impaled on a metal pole), who eventually painted h e r painful and r o m a n t i c

lile siory on tin and Masonile, that has inspired a huge cult to grow up around her? How was K a h l o . w h o died at the a g e

47 in 1954, transformed from the "wife of Diego Rivera" (as her brief obituary read) to the art world s x e r s i o n of S y l v i a P l a t

And how did her jewel-like paintings come to command multimillion-dollar prices?

F R I D A K A H L O , C O N S I D E R E D A M A R G I N A L F I G U R E W H E N S H E DIED IN 1954. IS N O W A S U P E R S T A R . HER I M A G E A D O R N S T - S H I R T S , H O L L Y W O O D STARS O P T I O N HER B I O G R A P H Y , A N D HER P A I N T I N G S C O M M A N D MULTIMILLION-D O L L A R P R I C E S . H O W MULTIMILLION-DSMULTIMILLION-D IT H A P P E N ?

Task 2

Mark these statements T (true) or F ^ ^

the sentence (s) on w h i c h S f f i ^ S S " 9 t 0 i n f°r m a t i°n °f , h e t e x t- ^nderNne

f

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Kahlo's self-portraits are well known all around the world. • Q

Fhda Kahlo's house became a museum.

Kahlo's biographies are written only in Spanish.

Many people admire Frida Kahlo.

Frida Kahlo was born in 1954.

Nowadays, Kahlo's works are high-valued.

"Casa AzuP is a Kahlo's painting.

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• a

Check your answers with a partner.

(19)

Skill: Inferring ideas

T a s k I ••' 1 ' " . ;

Decide which inference you can make about the text and underline the information which you the answer.

1 We can say that Little Frida's is a

C D museum • hospital

C I restaurant • • bank

2 The decoration we expect to find at Little Frida's is

C ] abstract glass objects • painted clay pots • pop art paintings d l tubular steel furniture

3 Frida Kahlo appeal is to

• Hispanics exclusively • high society art-collectors r ~ 1 just about everybody

• movie stars and other artists

4 We can assume from the text that Frida's life was

• rich CZI easy • difficult 1—3 boring

5 When Frida died in 1954 she was

I—l a cult figure

I—I an annonymous artist

I—l well-known by her artistic talent I—\ just a housewife

Clearing it up

T a s k Ibx

Look at this phrase from the text....

"... Hollywood figures, Including Madonna, have invested sizeable sums..."

V I S

• • Is this something that began in the past and continues now?

• • DO we know when Madonna invested the money?

Look! We still have the auxiliary verb form have +

meaning is different. — ' D u t t h e

"''ask lib

Read these sentences and underline the verbs.

a) I have visited Frida Kahlo's Museum. I went last summer.

b) I have hung a Frida Kahlo's poster on my bedroom wall. I put it there last week.

c) I have seen a lot of Frida Kahlo's paintings. I went to her exhibition at Marco last year.

• Which sentences tell you when the action happened?

(20)

Match both columns in order to form coherent paragraphs. Work in pairs.

1 Madonna has bought some Kahlos.

2 Perhaps, Frida Kahlo's work has been more successful in US and Europe than in Mexico.

| | Frida: T h e story of Frida K a h l o s t a g e d J

p u p p e t s , e l a b o r a t e c u t o u t s , a n d mask; p l a y e d at the H o u s t o n G r a n O p e r a la| J u n e .

I I T h e Houston M u s e u m of Fine Arts organize

1—1 " T h e W o r l d of Frida K a h l o " last summer.

3 Kahlo exhibitions have circled the globe, from Australia to Tokio.

4 Fakes have also crept into the market, according to several Kahlo experts.

5 Kahlos have gone much higher about prices.

6 Robert Xavier Rodriguez has written an opera about the Mexican painting goddess.

ji H O n e a p p e a r e d in H o u s t o n ' s " W o r l d of Frii K a h l o " f r o m a S p a n i s h c o l l e c t i o n in 1990

| | M a g d a C a r r a n z a (a c u r a t o r at the Cente

1 — 1 C u l t u r a l / A r t e C o n t e m p o r a n e o in Mexic

City) said in 1992: "...Frida b e c a m e a A m e r i c a n invention a n d a m a r k e t i n g thing.,

| | S h e p a i d o n e million d o l l a r s in a private $&. in 1 9 9 2 for "Self-Portrait with M o n k e y fro-1940".

In M a y 1991, at C h r i s t i e s ' s s o l d to a privat M e x i c a n collector f r o m M o n t e r r e y for th current auction r e c o r d of 1 . 6 5 million.

T a s k 2 b - , ;

Write down from each paragraph the verb used (activity) and if the specific time of the activit (if stated).

0i> fettllwi!^

Complete the table.

1/you/weAhey He/she/it

Affirmative

I have worked He

Negative

He hasn't

interrogative

Has ne

Words at work

Write the missing words. Read carefully the text and try to guess which words fit correctly..

S

The resurrection of Kahlo

1

in the 70 s, when work began to generate excitement in the women's movement. In 1973, Gloria Orenstein

a pioneering article in the Feminist Art Journal entitled "Frida Kahlo. Painting for Miracles." The piece was sparked by a small Kahlo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City. "Her artistic

is not commensurate with s t a t u r e a n d her importance," wrote Orenstein, a feminist scholar. a d d r e s s e d herself directly, intimately and viscerally to all and was the

first

g biological existence."

artist to give the aesthetic form to the drama of her

— a battle still rages over who first raised the flag of Kahlo Ramon Favela, associate professor o f . history at the University of California at Santa Barbara and the author of the forthcoming The Early Ufa and Times of Diego Rivera, questions the "white European feminist 'discovery' of Frida" and "subsequent elevation of Frida to the level of

cult figure and sainthood," arguing that a n d Latinos in California fomented

Ebb mmmi tua

in Kahlo's work... "

interest she liberation her started her woman Chicanos published reputation art however women feminist

(21)

Time

t o r e a d ! (4)

Museums

Have you ever visited a museum?

Have you been to Marco? _

What did/didn't you like about it? :

What exhibitions have you seen in Marco since it was opened?

How could you "visit" museums without leaving your home?

Before you read the text, "Digital Museums, Now?" make a list of ideas of how this could be possible. Work with your group. Then read the text and check if your ideas are included.

JW. -X«.

u s e u m s a c r o s s t h e c o u n t r y , a t t h e u r g i n g o f M i c r o s o f t c h a i r -m a n B i l l G a t e s , a r e d i g i t i z i n g ' h e i r c o l l e c t i o n s , p r o d u c -i n g a r t - f -i l l e d l a s e r d -i s k s , a n d t a l k i n g v i r t u a l r e a l i t y . T h o u g h t h i s is o n e w a y t o b r i n g t h e p a s t i n t o t h e f u t u r e , d o e s it m e a n t h a t v a n G o g h ' s s w e e p i n g p a i n t s t r o k e s a r e d e s t i n e d t o b r e a k d o w n i n t o d i n k y , w i n k i n g p i x e l s ^

T h e c u r r e n t t e c h n o l o g i c a l l a n d s c a p e a t t h e W h i t n e y ¿Museu m of A m e r i c a n A n i n c l ¿Museu d e s E d v a r d H o p p e r ' s c a t a l o g u e r a i -i o n n e o n a f -i v e - -i n c h c o m p a c t d i s k ( w h . c h c a n s t o r e t h e e q u i v a -l e n t o f 3 3 0 . 0 0 0 p a g e s o f p r i n t e d t e x t ) . T h e i n f o r m a t i o n is u p d a t -a b l e -a n d k e p t f r e s h s o s c h o l -a r s c a n t r a c k p a i n t i n g s , " s a y . m u s e

u m d i r e c t o r D a v i d R o s s , a l -t h o u g h -t r a d i -t i o n a l i s -t s c a n s -t i l l

l e a f t h r o u g h a n i n k o n

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»s t h e p a y p e r v i e w c o n -c e p t , w h a t R o s s -c a l l s t h e V i r t u a l R e a l i t y W i ^ g . A b a n k o f d i g i t a l i m a g e s w o u l d b e a v a i l a b l e f o r

People " t o ,c a l l u p a t h d i n e . "

A t t h e A r t I n s t i t u t e >1 C h i c a g o , a n i n t e r a c t i v e lasei . ¡ , , k c a n s p e w o u t e l e c t r o n i c i m a g e s o l 2 5 0 p a i n t i n g s a c c o m p a n i e d b v p o e m s a n d m u s i c . D i r e c t o r J a m e s W o o d s a y s , " I t ' s a n a t t e m p t t o c r e a t e t h e u l t i m a t e v i s i t t o ¡ h e m u s e u m . ' • A v a i l a b l e i n t h e g i l t

s h o p , t h e $ 8 0 IX ' U h Open d . s k

a l l o w s v i s i t o r s t o t o u c h a c o m p u t -e r s c r -e -e n ( o r c l i c k a m o u s -e i h o m e ) f o r d e t a i l s o f a p a n n i n g

3.V 1 9 9 5 t h e N a t i o n a l G a l l e r y i n W a s h i n g t o n . D . C . , h o p e s t o b u i l d a M i c r o G a l l e r y , w h e r e v i s i t o r s w o u l d e n g a g e i n a n i n t e r a c -t i v e v i d e o . R u s -t y P o w e l l , -t h e m u s e u m ' s d i r e c t o r , s a y s v i s i t o r s w o u l d be a b l e t o g e t " i n - d e p t h in-f o r m a t i o n , m o r e t h a n t h e y w o u l d b i b l i o g r a p h i c a l l y . " A l r e a d y a v a i l -a b l e is -a $ 9 9 . 9 5 l -a s e r d i s k f i l l e d w i t h t h e m u s e u m ' s 2 . 6 0 0 A m e r i -c a n p a i n t i n g s a n d s -c u l p t u r e .

S o m e c u l t u r e c r i t i c s a r g u e t h a t i m a g e o v e r l o a d w i l l s t r i k e , d i m i n i s h i n g t h e e x p e r i e n c e o f t h e o r i g i n a l a r t w o r k s h o u l d t h e c y -b e r s p a c e g e n e r a t i o n e v e n -b o t h e r t o v i s i t a m u s e u m . " E v e r y b o d y s a i d s i m i l a r t h t n g s a b o u t ' s l i d e s a n d p h o t o g r a p h s , " s a y s d i r e c t o r R o b e r t B e r g m a n o f t h e C l e v e -l a n d M u s e u m o f ' A r t . " N o w t h e r e ' s m o r e r a t h e r t h a n less i n -t e r e s -t i n a r -t m u s e u m s . " W i l l -t h e n e w t e c h n o l o g y r e n d e r S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g m u s e u m v i s i t s o b s o l e t e ? / " W e l l . " s a y s W o o d , " t h e m o r e t h e

; M o n a L i s a h a s b e e n r e p r o d u c e d .

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T a s k 1

Read the text as quickly as you can, and tick the right completion.

1 The article is about:

new technology different museums pay per view information new computers on the market • I computer museums

art collections reproduced on interactive software

2 The text probably comes from:

a monthly magazine a book

an encyclopaedia

3 The author of the text is:

n Bethany Tarbell CI3 Peter Deeg

4 Some art critics state that the original artwork is becoming: I 1 less interesting

I I more interesting f I more valuable

T a s k 2

Match the museum names to the descriptions.

1 Art Institute of Chicago. | | This museum expects to build a Micro Galle

2 Whitney Museum of American Art. j | This museum has the pay-per-view concept

3 National Gallery. j | This museum has interactive laser disk w images and paintings.

D W°rk in groups Read the example notices of museums in California and

New York. Write a notice giving information about « m

S H O W S & E X H I B I T I O N S

C A L I F O R N I A

L A J O L L A - 1 4 T H A N N U A L L A

J O L L A A N T I Q U E S S H O W &

S AL I C , M A Y 2 0 . 2 1 . & 2 2 , 1994. A d m i s -s i o n $ 6 . 0 0 . F r i d a y 1 2 - 8 p . m . , S a t u r d a y

I l a . m - 7 p . m . & S u n d a y l l a . m . - 5 p . m . La <-iolla H i g h S c h o o l , 7 5 0 N a u t i l u s S t r e e t , I J o l l a , C A . P i n e a n t i q u e s p r e s e n t e d i n d e c o r a t e d r o o m s e t t i n g s . O p e n -i n g d a y l e c t u r e / p r e v -i e w & C o n t -i n e n t a l b r e a k f a s t , F r i d a v , / V i a y 2 0 t h 9 : 0 0 a m $ 2 5 . 0 0 . " T h e E n d l e s s H u n t : A n I n s i d e r ' s V i e w o f C o l l e c t i n g a n d D e c o r a t i n g w i t h A n t i q u e s " b y B a r b a r a M i i o O h r b a c h , n o t e d a u t h o r o f b o o k s a b o u t d e c o r a t i n g , N e w Y o r k . F o r i n f o r m a t i o n o r t i c k e t s c a l l ( 6 1 9 ) 4 5 4 0 7 1 5 o r 4 5 7 1 9 0 0 . B e n e f i t s t h e L a J o l l a H i g h S c h o o l S c h o l a r -s h i p F o u n d a t i o n a n d T h e F o u n d a t i o n o f

I-a Jolla H i g h S c h o o l . D u r i n g S h o w I lours ( 0 1 9 ) 4 6 4 - 3 0 8 5 o r 4 5 4 - 3 0 8 7 .

N L W Y O R K

N L W Y O R K - N E W Y O R K AR-M O R Y A N T 1 Q U L S SI I O W ' AR-M a v 4 - 8 . Sev enth Regiment Armorvat 67th Street and Park Avenue. Wednesday: 4 to

Thursday- Samrdi4\ noon t o 9 , ,m

Sunday: noon to(>pm. .\Jni.i»siun >10.00

100 dealers from U.S.. Canada and fraiKv featuring C o m m e n t . . ! . . \ n u - r u a n

and Lnglish ISthand 19thcenua vlurn.. rure and accessories, silver, jeu elrv, ruy>. rare books. paintings ' and

m ore... s o m e th i ng for e ven-one. " Q u a I i t \

a n t i q u e s at alforJable price*." Weiufv

M a n a g e m e n t . l or further m i n i m a l ¡on-( 9 ! -J ) r , » ) S Î - H ' J

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Clearing it u p

Task-C o m p l e t e t h e s p a c e s w i t h t h e a p p r o p r i a t e f o r m of have a n d t h e v e r b s in p a r e n t h e s e s . M u s e u m s (increase) the a m o u n t of i n f o r m a t i o n they s t o r e e v e r y year,

a n d a r t w o r k c o p i e s not (reduce) the n u m b e r of p e o p l e w h o w a n t to see the originals.

A l t h o u g h culture critics (say) that m u s e u m s will b e e m p t y on

w e e k e n d s , traditional m u s e u m s ( b e c o m e ) m o r e interesting since n e w digital d i s k s a p p e a r e d . In M o n t e r r e y , w e k n o w that t h o u s a n d s of p e o p l e

(visit) M a r c o e a c h s e a s o n .

Words at work

T a s k

Fill in the missing words using the past participle of the verbs.

Present Past Participle

h e a r h e a r d

write w r o t e

f o r g e t forgot

find f o u n d

s p e n d spent

b u y b o u g h t

w i n w o n

bring b r o u g h t

eat ate

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Time to read!

(1)

Write the numbers 1 to 5 in the parentheses according to the chronological order of

when these means of transportation were first used by man.

! I Follow these instructions:

a ) With a partner, make a list of all the modes of transport that you know

b) Now decide which one is the fastest, the slowest, the most expensive

(25)

Time to read!

(1)

Write the numbers 1 to 5 in the parentheses according to the chronological order of

when these means of transportation were first used by man.

! I Follow these instructions:

a ) With a partner, make a list of all the modes of transport that you know

b) Now decide which one is the fastest, the slowest, the most expensive

(26)

I E C B S K S

WHAT WAS THE WORLD LIKE?

We have become used to all types of modern devices which make life

easier for us such as cellular phones, computers, satellite dishes. But, how did

our grand parents visualize their world? Let's look at some news published

many years ago:

APRIL 1919

An express train could travel the

240,GOO-mile distance to the moon in six

months, but the Earth's gravitational force presents an unsurmountable obstacle to lunar travel. H u g e guns, sky rockets, dynamite,

nitroglycerine and TNT have all been rejected

as possible w a y s to generate the 414,000

horsepower required to fly to the moon.

COMMENT: Perhaps you know that the Apollo 11 rocket which carried

the first men to the moon in 1969 was powered by a

combination of liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen and

kerosene. In modern times, you and all your friends of the

same age know that:

Jupiter has been photographed.

The pictures have been sent back to Earth.

They have been studied exhaustively.

i'eici: i

What do these numbers refer to?

Write the sentences from the text on the lines.

240,000

414,000

1969

Task 2

According to the text circle the two sentences below that do not give true information.

Underline the sentences which give true information.

1 The distance to the moon is more than 200,000 miies

2 Cellular phones and computers make life more difficult for us

3 Dynamite can not be used as fuel to go to the moon

4 Our grandparents visualized the world exactly the same as we do now

5 Man landed on the moon before 1970

• Working in pairs find, out about the first landing on the moon:

a

a Date

b Names of astronauts who were involved in the mission

c Famous words expressed upon landing

d Name of the President of the United States in those days

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Clearing it up

T a s k 1

Let us analyze this structure. Tick the right answer:

Jupiter has been photographed

Who or what took the photos?

The Mariner space probe

Not mentioned

A photo-telescope

An astronaut

Why do you think it w a r mentioned?

• Because nobody knows did it.

O Because it is not Importm: ;.> this case.

What do we call this kmc? of arnmar structured

• Active voice.

• Passive voice.

T a s k 2

Read the text "April 1919" on page 30. Can you find and underline one example of

Passive Voice?

Can you think of some other examples? for instance:

Cellular phones have been sold at lower Diices.

PRESENT PERFECT i S S I V E V O I C E

(You have already practiced the p r e s e t perfect tense in the previous unit)

SUBJECT

HAVE BuEH

Hm

PAST PARTICIPLE

JUPITER THE PICTURES THEY

HA*; Ji-.-rv HAVf BE" :N HAVE BEEK:

PHOTOGRAPHED SENT BACi< TO EARTH STUDIED EXHAUSTIVELY

I

Figure

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