Culture and Education

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City, Culture and Education. N. 07 (2020)

City, Culture and Education. N. 07 (2020)

conservation as an element of continuity and social cohesion, within the framework of urban transformation processes and of new economic models. One of the most innovative initiatives of recent times is the new Oodi Central Library in Helsinki, which revives the traditional integration of education and culture in libraries, reinforcing links with the promotion of active citizenship, social cohesion and digital literacy, while acting as a hub for a much wider library network. Another renowned and exemplary project is “EN RESIDÈNCIA”, a Barcelona-based initiative that takes professional artists to secondary schools to mentor long-lasting creative processes that foster learning, experimentation, collaboration between young people and between schools and cultural organisations, and public dissemination of a diverse range of styles and aesthetics. Meanwhile, the city of Katowice has been using music as an identity and development factor for several years now, ultimately joining the UNESCO Creative Cities Network in 2015. The current policies in this area also incorporate an educational aspect, which is reflected in initiatives for access to music education, promotion of the training and professional development of bands and the exploration of intersections with other dimensions of local development. Last but not least, the Arena da Cultura Free School of Arts is a successful programme from Belo Horizonte, also recognised in 2014 with the UCLG International Award - Mexico City - Culture 21, for having developed a wide range of arts education available to the entire population, based on the principles and objectives of human rights, social inclusion, cultural diversity, lifelong education and the transformation of the city.
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2004 Ostrosky et al Effects of Culture and Education on Neuropsychological Testing

2004 Ostrosky et al Effects of Culture and Education on Neuropsychological Testing

To determine the influence of education on the cog- nitive profile of the illiterate Maya group once mem- bers acquired basic reading and writing skills, we com- pared the neuropsychological profile of illiterate versus the profile of participants with 1 to 4 years of formal ed- ucation. We found significant differences in favor of the participants with 1 to 4 years of schooling in attention and visuoperceptual processing (visual detection, copy of a figure), visual and verbal memory (delay recall of complex figure, verbal memory), and in total NEUROPSI score. These data show that even if it is true that culture influences the development and use of certain skills (e.g., visuospatial and hand position), ed- ucation also affects cognitive test performance. Results lead us to suppose that education relates with the rein- forcement of some specific skills such as attention and memory abilities.
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The appropriation of culture and psychological development: contributions of historical-cultural psychology for child education

The appropriation of culture and psychological development: contributions of historical-cultural psychology for child education

It is understood that this generic subject - true man - must be understood in its totality, conside- ring it as a social being (Marx, 1974) that integrates aspects in the form of unity, such as afectivity and intellect, what is logical and historical, cultural and social, reason and emotion. herefore, it is considered that the study of the thesis in question is relevant to seek answers to childhood edu- cation aimed at developing the higher psychical functions of children from the irst years of life. Seeking to fulill this need, this paper has the goal of bringing awareness for teachers and re- searchers about some aspects of the constitution and psychological development as a historical process mediated by culture, understood as the historically elaborated set of material and non- material human production, and to relect on its implications in early childhood education. In this attempt, this study presents a summary of the historical process of psychical development of young children, when the process of constitution of the human being in man will be emphasized, on learning as a fundamental process for psychical development and on the educational activity as a necessary condition for the development of higher psychological functions to occur.
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2003 Rosselli & Ardila The impact of culture and education on non verbal neuropsychological measurements

2003 Rosselli & Ardila The impact of culture and education on non verbal neuropsychological measurements

Culture is understood as the way of living of a human group and includes behaviors, ways of thinking, feeling, knowledge, values, attitudes, and belief (Harris, 1983). Cultural elements (the physical elements characteristic of that human group such as symbolic elements, clothes, ornaments, houses, instruments, weapons, etc.) are also included in the definition of culture. Education can be regarded as an element of culture (Ardila, Ostrosky, & Mendoza, 2000) and includes literacy and schooling. Literacy refers to the acquisition of reading and schooling to the process of learning at school. Culture and formal education (as a cultural element) have sig- nificant effects on cognition (Berry, 1979; Cole, 1997). Greenfield stated ‘‘the major factor that makes a culture more or less different from the culture conventions surrounding ability testing is the degree of formal edu- cation possessed by the participants’’ (Greenfield, 1997, p. 1119). Culture prescribes what is learned and at what age (Ferguson, 1954; Irvine & Berry, 1988). Formal education is a most significant element in culture, even though formal education can be interpreted a kind of transnational culture. The fundamental aims of school are equivalent for all schools and school reinforces certain specific values regardless of where they are lo- cated. Hence, school could be seen as a culture unto itself, the culture of school. School not only teaches, but also helps in developing certain attitudes that will be useful for future new learnings (Ardila et al., 2000).
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Value-based Education in Culture and Curriculum. Gandhi´s Ideas for sustainable development

Value-based Education in Culture and Curriculum. Gandhi´s Ideas for sustainable development

Gandhi (Karunakaran and Thomas, 2012, pp.10-12). Gandhi’s education is designed through three aspects or through three Hs: Head-Heart-Hand – these three H’s, head, heart and hand represent knowledge; spirituality and livelihood of a student respectively. A student learns to train himself to be wise; to be moral and to be self sufficient by using his head, heart and hands and limbs. Gandhi aimed to liberate people from ignorance and slavery and a salaried job. His ideas of education are thus linked with self-development; rural development and sustainable development. Gandhi aimed to remove human aversion for manual labour. Gandhi contends that a certain amount of manual labour helps human being’s physical and psychological health. Furthermore, student is prescribed to learn a craft or vacation that will help to earn while learning. Gandhi further prescribed compulsory education for children between seven and fourteen years. By the end of education students will be equipped with knowledge and potentiality in one profession. Further students with such background will have willingness to serve in rural areas which actually helps sustainable development. The major features of Nai Talim are summarized: mother-tongue as medium of instruction is major feature; free and compulsory primary education for all children for at least seven years and; moral instruction for all round development; education related to physical environment; rooted in the culture and lives of people; education through craft not merely books and abstractions and education that helps character building and craft-centred and vocational training are other features of Nai Talim. Further Gandhi prescribes certain qualities for teacher. These include a good character; to have eligibility to teach on moral instruction; value of non-violence and communal harmony; self-reliance and respect for manual labour and women (Iyengar, 2010).
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Business intelligence and organizational culture : case study in a higher education company in Perú

Business intelligence and organizational culture : case study in a higher education company in Perú

companies in the BI market in Perú are IBM, Oracle, SAP, Microsoft and SAS. In addition, the offers of BI solution are Everis, Informese, Datco, Focus, Gora and Analytics, which work with SAP (J. Casas, personal interview, March 17, 2018) The sectors that have more BI applications are telecom, retail, banks and insurance companies in Perú. In addition, the BI development is more in the private sector than in the public sector. However, two public institutions that are getting progress in BI such us Aduanas-SUNAT (Peruvian National Superintendence of Customs and Tax Administration) and “Banco de la Nación”.
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Setting patterns to analyze a classroom culture based on children´s thought

Setting patterns to analyze a classroom culture based on children´s thought

- There is an atmosphere of inquiry and openness. The teacher and students use questions such as ‘Why?’, ‘What if?’ and ‘Why not?, in order to analyze problems and make decisions. Students take certain roles in activities as they practice different kinds of thinking: they make predictions, gather information, organize the information, and question conclusions. Teachers show students ways to carry out tasks in the classroom, and they give students better advice than criticism and evaluation. In an infant education classroom is very important make children realize what the situation they have to deal with is. So, the questions that teacher has to use has to be closer than the previous ones: what happen? Oh, there is a problem here; do we stop the class for a while? Ok, let´s talk about the problem. What do you think the solution could be?
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TítuloKnowledge culture and communication culture

TítuloKnowledge culture and communication culture

As mass media partially born, the printed book is very dependent on learning the rules of «digital» signs system and more than on well cultural consume rules. Against the popular culture sustained by the printing press, semiotics institution of modern occidental system of education supported an erudition culture that establishes the rules of utilizing and consuming of the printed books. More unmotivated than unmotivated language signs, printed book «digital» signs are silent; they don’t speak and without learning they are muted. To learn the «digital» signs appears as knowledge. Erudition culture that is a knowledge culture is a silent culture and its silence is our libraries silence, the silence of our reading. The analogical signs are directly understood and they don’t need knowledge different from that of usage. The analogi- cal signs are talkative and speak for themselves. They don’t need separate knowledge and for them knowledge means ability to communicate. Direct communication induces rules to com- municate every time for every communicational situation and allows for their change ad hoc. Analogical signs perception is very empirical. It doesn’t need theories and can be learned by trail and error procedure. In communication, where everything is process based and immediate, the direct effective performance is important and not the theoretically detached speculation which comes after the communication process — here, in communication the music you can sing not the music you can hear is important!
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Dimensions of Intercultural Education in the Twenty first Century

Dimensions of Intercultural Education in the Twenty first Century

The complexity of this problem is heightened still further by the fact that our own culture is in a state of crisis, not principally because of immigration, but because of the collapse of our traditional system of values, probably as a result of the rapid changes that have accompanied enormous economic growth since the Industrial Revolution. Whatever the ultimate reason for this, it is true to say that western Europe is increasingly abandoning its own cultural and religious heritage in favour of the values of the marketplace, to the extent that almost every area of human life is now conceptualised in terms of the consumer values of “choice”, “value for money” and “throw away and replace”. Against this panorama, there is a real danger that the deep values in our own culture, and in the other ancient cultures of the world, will be forgotten as the multicultural society is conceived of crassly as a kind of relativist cultural hypermarket in which people choose the trolley-full of values that suit them at that moment. In this case, the problem of multiculturalism is superficially resolved, because all the different groups in a particular society become more and more similar in their surface features, and the deeper values and beliefs which create differences between them are trivialised as a kind of “consumer choice” which is no more significant than the colour of one’s car (Rieff, 1993-94).
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LA EDUCACIÓN PARA LA SALUD Y EL DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE: IMPLICACIONES PEDAGÓGICAS EN LA FORMACIÓN DEL PROFESIONAL

LA EDUCACIÓN PARA LA SALUD Y EL DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE: IMPLICACIONES PEDAGÓGICAS EN LA FORMACIÓN DEL PROFESIONAL

The present work proposes to contribute to the formation of a more integral and proactive citizen by means of its implication in educational strategies in the university context related to the promotion of health and the good practices of sustainable development. It is theoretically based on health education oriented towards sustainable development as a fundamental tool for the formation of a culture for health and be actively and productively involved in the promotion of health, in the implementation of good practices of sustainable development in educational institutions And communities. There are proposed teaching strategies to increase the students' motivation, their skills and knowledge of the problems that affect health and the environment. The developed research is part of the project Professional training for the management of sustainable development, which at the University of Las Tunas.
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TítuloLa formación "antisesgo" del profesorado : hacia una pedagogía de la justicia social

TítuloLa formación "antisesgo" del profesorado : hacia una pedagogía de la justicia social

the idea of representational or sampling diversity rather than intellectual diversity and systematic change in the methodologies for organizing school knowledge. In a sense, we are still so deeply invested in our disciplinary training that we still hold too earnestly on to the insulated subject matter specialization of the curriculum—a point that that Ladson-Billings and Brown, and Nieto et al. make. We hold on too fervently to the boundary maintenance organization of knowledge in schooling that separates the informal from the formal and that excludes the popular—the world of student experiences outside the classroom and the school—from consid- eration within the establishment curriculum and what we do inside schools. We believe that an educational reform model that insists on the consoli- dation of more diversity in schooling, more inclusion, simply leads to an exhaustion of available school resources without changing the way in which knowledge is organized and education is delivered to minority and majority students. What we instead need is a more systematic exploration of the new, flexible subjectivities that are being formed in youth culture and in the new economies of our age. More attention, then, in a practical and rigorous intellectual sense, must be paid to the elaboration of the multidisciplinary approach that builds elements across the boundary maintenance of the formal and the informal, the establishment and the popular, Eurocentrism and multiculturalism. This means thinking relationally about curriculum on the topic of multiplicity and difference in education. It means integrat- ing back into the pedagogical experience and the organization of knowl- edge in schooling all those tensions, contradictions, and porosities that we tend to suppress as we process human experience and historical specificity into curricular knowledge. It means quite literally abandoning the auratic status of concepts such as “culture,” “identity,” and “ethnicity”—the vari- ables that Ladson-Billings and Brown and Nieto et al. postulate as lying beneath the surface of the diversity discourse—for a recognition of the vital porosity that exists among all human groups in the 21st century, and the tremendous potential this holds for developing a new ecumenical and cosmopolitan ethos in schooling.
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Language and culture

Language and culture

Missionary friends whom I had been helping to solve some of the orthographic problems in the rare dialect, in which they had been working, let me off at a regular stop so that I could catch a bus to the capital of Ecuador. But I was shocked to see almost a hundred local Indians dead drunk. I had heard about such celebrations in honour of a local saint but this was overwhelming. I could not believe that people would sell themselves to such senselessness. The only person who was sane was the owner of the store specializing in various alcoholic drinks and so I introduced myself and asked him if I could ask him some questions. He was apparently happy to have someone to talk to, and he kindly tried to suggest the possible reasons for such behaviour: poverty and lack of education. In fact, he said that the people did not really know their own history.
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Key factors of the growth of the haitian SDA church community in the North American División of SDA churches

Key factors of the growth of the haitian SDA church community in the North American División of SDA churches

There is another factor, which plays an important role in the development and the sustainability of a church, as much as, culture, language, evangelism and even leadership, it is education. Evangelism is primarily an effort to help save His people, it is a mean by which God populates His kingdom with have lost previously in the world and have come to discover the beauty and the power of salvation. That is what Jesus did for all on Calvary. So, the preaching of the Gospel as Paul said in Romans 1:16 is power unto salvation for whoever believes. Now how can one believe unless he is taught in the word, therefore the work of education, when we believe, we enter into a new covenant with God. God never makes a covenant with His people without admon- ishing them to teach the law of this covenant to the next generation. He did it for Israel, so He intended to do for everybody using the members of this covenantal body to edu- cate the new converts, their children so they can become strong in their belief, engage in the same work of educating others after them. Koops (1959) explains it clear that Christian parents, members of the covenant, will see immediately that it is not only their responsibility to provide an education for their children. It is also their responsibility to provide a Christian education for their children. But the necessity of recognizing the di- vine-human relationship within the educating process does not as such and by itself de- termine the structure of the educational system. Because he said, parental responsibility of educating their children comes before evangelism not with evangelism. Moreover, Ngursangzeli (2007) believes in school and campus crusades, which primarily focus on non-Christians students.
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Culture, competition, and happiness

Culture, competition, and happiness

Last but not least, competition means different things for different scholars. Mainstream economists conceptualize competition as an “end-state”: competitive markets should achieve efficient social outcomes. The opinions collected in the WVS, however, may not coincide with the economist´s vision of competition in that it may be representing a ¨process¨ (Blaug, 2001) in which firms attempt to maximize their stake of the market, sometimes achieving a zero-sum outcome: what one firm gains, other firm looses. That process may lead to satisfactory outcomes, e.g. lower prices, but may also lead to higher unemployment, lower quality products, or what is commonly denominated a “race to the bottom”. Under this second view competition may drive firms to undertaking unfair, unjust and environmentally damaging strategies in order to get a larger share of the market 10 , thus a bad thing (Hahnel, 2011). I postulate that this process-view of competition, expressed by the answers collected in the WVS, is the view of what ordinary people do understand by competition (more below).
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Vocabulary strategies to develop english speaking skills in the students of eighth grade at Unidad Educativa Manuela Saenz pcei distance school, Ballenita, province of Santa Elena 2014 – 2015.

Vocabulary strategies to develop english speaking skills in the students of eighth grade at Unidad Educativa Manuela Saenz pcei distance school, Ballenita, province of Santa Elena 2014 – 2015.

8 The purpose of this research is to find new techniques for teaching the English language through vocabulary. Vocabulary is essential, it promotes a good comprehension, it increases their lexical or the communication with other people, it will change their fluency. Also teaching vocabulary is very important because, nowadays it is necessary to know two languages in our country. English language skills are regarded as a key requirement for an individual to obtain a better salary. Some companies stated that salaried professionals with good English language skills advance quickly, resulting in better salaries and conditions. For that reason it is totally necessary to create vocabulary strategies, to help teachers, students and parents.
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Digital culture as a converging paradigm for technology and culture : challenges for the culture sector

Digital culture as a converging paradigm for technology and culture : challenges for the culture sector

It may not seem such a big deal for a cultural institution to make its photographic collections available in a photo-sharing site and to allow users to add tags or comments and to share content. Nonetheless, many cultural institutions still face difficul- ties in allowing users to interact with their collections and share their experiences with others. Sharism has emerged as a new phenomenon that responds to the new opportunities offered by the networked environment. Social networking combined with mobile technologies has had a major impact on how information is exchanged and how knowledge is constructed. Cultural content needs to be part of this process if it is to adapt to the reality de- scribed by Foresta (cited above): “Culture is a memory, collective memory, dependent on communication for its creation, extension, evolution and preservation”. The culture sector needs to transfer content to where people are online —whether in social networking sites, photo- and video-sharing sites, etc— and to seize the op- portunities arising in the context of digital networks. This does not imply abandoning the institutional website, but extending reach by using networks and recognizing that the impact potential of an online network is greater than the impact of any single node in a network (Barabási, 2003). Cultural institutions should not wait for users to visit institutional websites but should attract the user’s attention in the sites they already visit.
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Culture, communication and environment |

Culture, communication and environment |

this way of thinking has a symbolic parallel in the functionalist school of communication represented by lerner and schramm. they believed culture and mass media to be agents of modernization. media would influence the social change needed to reach development. that would mean leaving behind traditions and introducing modern thought patterns. modern thinking, as op- posed to traditional thinking, was related to urbanization, literacy, and even to learning new ways of behavior which would cause institutional changes. these changes would sustain the modernization process. modernization, the- refore, was synonymous with “going to school, reading papers, receiving a salary, buying goods, casting votes and having an opinion about different to- pics” (mowlana and wilson, 1994: 8).
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PURPOSE, STRATEGY AND CULTURE

PURPOSE, STRATEGY AND CULTURE

The role of the board is to establish not only the right culture and behaviours but also the right incentives and disincentives. In doing so, the board must be credible in the eyes of employees and stakeholders. The new Code therefore states that boards are responsible for workforce policies and practices which reinforce a healthy culture. Employees are expected to display the right behaviours, and the board should set the standards, observe those behaviours and critique them if necessary.

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TítuloPerforming Culture and Breaking Rules

TítuloPerforming Culture and Breaking Rules

Every tradition, then, is always changing. This is why traditions are the source of great freedom and liberation for the human being! To be an outstanding member of any tradition is truly, paradoxically, to be outside of it, to stand mockingly above it and to transcend the limitations of this tradition in a way that, in truth, approximates Machiavellian irony. To be a great sculptor (as opposed to a mediocre one) is to understand the rules that make it «happen» but also to shift the central thesis in that argument and to liberate the hand and the chisel from the dogmatic constraints of the past in an act of spiritual freedom that forces consensus reality into hiding out of sheer shock and awe. Such acts of self-assured mocking mastery (of form and tradition) constitute the organizing principles of great art, i.e. revolutionary art, i.e. traditional (canonical) art, and also of a great performance of tradition. Culture loves its skilful rule-break- ers. A Goethe or a Shakespeare understood the logic and limitations of their native languages better than almost anyone, but their mastery of their language gave them the sufficient skill set to renew and change the very modus operandi of the language itself, and to change their contemporary culture, literary form and society in the process. An Einstein, Picasso, Wagner or Goethe is a perfect example of a traditionalist revolutionary. By understanding and skilfully breaking the rules of that tradition that nurtured them they became that tradition.
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Valores y clima organizacional en docentes de un instituto de educación superior de Lima

Valores y clima organizacional en docentes de un instituto de educación superior de Lima

In Peru, Escurra (2003) conducted a study with school children and found that the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient scored between .70 and .79. In the study of Grimaldo and Merino (2009), carried out with 254 university students, the alpha coeffi cients obtained scored between .53 and. 78. For the pur- poses of this study, the latest version will be used. - Perception of organizational climate ques- tionnaire (Litwin & Stringer, 1968). Its objective is to assess the degree of staff satisfaction at work. It contains nine items, organized into the following dimensions of values: structure, responsibility, re- ward, challenge, relations, cooperation, standards, conflicts, and identity. In Peru, this questionnaire has been adapted by Vicuña (2006) through the method of construct analysis.
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