study of training needs

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Needs analysis study on the development of multicultural counseling gamification modules for counselors in training

Needs analysis study on the development of multicultural counseling gamification modules for counselors in training

races. It is also in line with the studies conducted by Alexander, Kruczek & Ponterotto (2005) and Kim and Lyons (2003; 2011), which emphasizes the importance of experiential learning in all counseling and education curricula to expose the counselors in training to the cultural reality of the school environment. Similarly, Cook, Krell, Hayden, Gracia & Denitzio (2016) and Swazo and Celinska (2014) highlighted the importance of fieldwork and international study abroad as pedagogical strategies for graduate students. This notion is supported by Hays, Dean and Chang (2007), and Collins, Arthur, Brown and Kennedy (2013), who mentioned the importance of applied experiences in multicultural counseling pedagogy; for example, exposure to diverse peers and individuals as well as campus and community outreach and advocacy as they enable to translate the theory into practice and look into a broader and systemic conceptualization of clients’ experiences and professional practice of the counselor. Hence, the cultivation of multicultural counseling competencies requires something beyond didactic teaching. The use of gamification as a tool in the field of counseling has long been recognized by several researchers as it provides a positive influence on the counseling process (Varenhorst, 1973; Crocker and Wroblewski, 1975; Westwood, 1994). According to Crocker and Wroblewski (1975), the use of gamification in counseling offers six functions in helping a relationship: a) to increase the individual’s sensitivity to unobserved behavior; b) to enable individuals deal with the inability to feel; c) to offer opportunities to confront the laws of the game as an analogy to life and norms in different societies; d) to enable play and risk-taking behavior to be highlighted; e) to create a safe environment for experimenting with new behavior; and (f) to help individuals learn strategies of mobility. Kim & Lyons (2003) also suggested that gamification and simulations can be used in conjunction with didactic teaching to nurture and enhance multicultural competencies among counseling students based on three-dimensional competencies, namely awareness, knowledge and skills.
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7 Lee mas

Empowering Teachers, Triggering Change: A Case Study of Teacher Training through Action Research

Empowering Teachers, Triggering Change: A Case Study of Teacher Training through Action Research

However, while it is, quite logically, assumed that engaging in research will achieve these two major learning outcomes, this has not been analysed in any great detail, and, in fact, it is diffi cult to fi nd any study where the actual learning poten- tial of inquiry in teacher-training is analysed (but see Escobar Urmeneta, 2013). This is precisely what the present paper sets out to do. Analyzing the process fol- lowed by a single trainee in her fi nal research project for a Master’s Degree in Teaching English as a Foreign Language, I will try to trace and identify instances of learning in an attempt to see to what extent engaging in research really allows trainees to integrate new ideas into their teaching practice, refl ect on their own teaching, and thus make sustainable change possible. At the same time, I will try to identify instances of refl ection, and identify what elements in the research process trigger this development. In this particular instance, the research project put to the test an approach to teaching English that had been presented in the Master’s as an alternative to traditional, textbook-based EFL teaching, specifi cally addressing the needs of young learners in a bilingual or CLIL project.
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18 Lee mas

Implementing Plurilingualism in Higher Education: Teacher Training Needs and Plan Evaluation

Implementing Plurilingualism in Higher Education: Teacher Training Needs and Plan Evaluation

The current higher education system is characterised by an increasing diversity, inter- connectivity and international mobility. Within this context, many post-secondary education institutions have been bound to increase their international profile and academic offer (Varghese, 2008; Weber and Dudesrstadt, 2008). As a consequence of this process, the number of plurilingual and English-medium instruction (EMI) degree programmes has grown significantly in Spanish universities during the last few years becoming a new trend within the Bologna system (Doiz, Lasagabaster and Sierra, 2013; Fortanet, 2013; Pérez-Vidal, 2014). In contrast to what occurs in earlier educational stages, in which the implementation and development of bilingual and plurilingual programmes are officially regulated by the regional governments (cf. Junta de Andalucia, 2005), in higher education there are no officially regulated guidelines; therefore, such development becomes a complex challenge for university administrators and authorities. On the other hand, the quick implementation of plurilingual plans requires the design and development of teacher training programmes that enable lectures to cope with the appropriate methodologies adapted to the needs required by the plurilingual courses (Pavón and Gaustad, 2013). Although some universities are increasingly offering teaching staff with opportunities to improve their language skills, most have not been explicitly trained in specific educational methodologies to be used in plurilingual teaching contexts (Coyle, Hood and Marsh, 2010). On the contrary, plurilingual teaching at university level is usually performed in a “rather casual manner” (Costa and Coleman, 2010: 26); consequently, a desperate need of new methodological and teaching techniques has arisen among the teaching community (Salaberri and Sánchez-Pérez, 2012). The aim of this study is to analyse the teacher training needs of the faculty participating in Plurilingualism Promotion Plan implemented at a state university in Andalusia (Spain), as well as to describe the teacher training program on plurilingual methodologies carried out at this university. Likewise, an evaluation of the development of the Plan implemented at this institution as a result of a bottom-up process will be provided by means of a descriptive analysis according to 16 indicators concerning institutional strategy, internationalisation of the curriculum and teaching staff, from 2012 to 2015. This study is potentially useful for university regional and national policymakers in the field of language policies as it provides interesting data on the implementation of a pioneer plurilingualism promotion plan in a Spanish university.
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18 Lee mas

Opinions, perceptions and attitudes of a group of students taking a Bilingual Infant Teacher Training Degree: an empirical study

Opinions, perceptions and attitudes of a group of students taking a Bilingual Infant Teacher Training Degree: an empirical study

Although the programme can be deemed thus far an overall success, it is certainly worth paying heed to the minority opinions amongst the responses as we seek further to improve the bilingual degrees. One example is the student who mentioned the “language” factor involved in assessment, raising a very legitimate concern. We must try to ensure that language is not an obstacle to a student demonstrating what they know and should also make explicit how we attempt to achieve this so that they too can apply similar principles in the future. In fact, drawing attention more explicitly to several elements of the approach is a recurring theme and would also aid students such as the one who responded that they liked the way of working, but did not see how it could be applied in the infant or primary classroom. Likewise, a small minority of students believed that certain areas of their lin- guistic competence in English had not improved. This tends to run contrary to what their lecturers have observed. It may be a positive step to develop ways in which we can make students aware of their own learning and progression in this aspect through formative as- sessment, which would surely be motivating for them. It is also clear that complementary training offered until now has not been exploited by students. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of them do assert that online courses in English language and teaching strate- gies for bilingual education would be of benefit. This is something that needs to be reeva- luated in order to cater better for their training needs.
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20 Lee mas

Student-teachers’ written reports about their own learning processes from lesson study

Student-teachers’ written reports about their own learning processes from lesson study

However, a major challenge is making this research useful for the educational community. Some scholars perceive that their work will have little actual impact on end-users. Furthermore, research is often seen by academics as part of their professional development rather than a way to address social needs (Ion, Stîngu, & Marin, 2018). Therefore, engaging teachers in research would be an effective way to connect education research to real classroom needs while awakening teach- ers’ awareness of their key role in improving practice. The focus on teacher as researcher has implications for ITE, which needs to prepare student-teachers to be able to conduct systematic inquiry in their classroom. Lesson study is a vehicle that can help new teachers to begin their professional lives as teacher–researchers. Not only does research for their development have to be taken into account but also student-teachers’ involvement in the way their training is designed. Research using lesson study can allow student-teachers to decide the focus of classroom- based inquiry based on their own interests, related to their teaching task in a both theoretical and practical way. It empowers student-teachers with the freedom and flexibility to explore their own map of educational concerns, which relate to the needs of their pupils.
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15 Lee mas

A study of the potential of training to be transferred to the workplace

A study of the potential of training to be transferred to the workplace

As regards the methods and instructional techniques, the frequencies of use were very variable. There were more trainers who used training interventions linked to in-the-room training process (lecture, to make examples, exercises to practice training content in-the room, demonstrations) more frequently. Those training interventions extending teaching action outside the classroom to support transfer process (post-training coaching, plans of action, activities to practice training content in workplace) were used less frequently. These less frequent three training interventions are strategies that make it possible to customize the learning transfer process to the specific characteristics of the trainees’ workplace. This homogeneous treatment of learners can also be seen in a less frequent use of two adult learning principles: the detection of trainees’ learning needs in order to set learning objectives accordingly and the use a variety of methods with a view in meeting diverse demands of the learners. Finally, assessing trainee learning was not a habitual practice among the trainers surveyed.
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12 Lee mas

Addressing CLIL Lecturers’ Needs: Reflections on Specific Methodological Training

Addressing CLIL Lecturers’ Needs: Reflections on Specific Methodological Training

• Problem 8: 64% of potential CLIL teachers said they would design their didactic materials using mere translation of those employed for regular L1 teaching. Reviewing these findings, one can see that the question of classroom interaction patterns and practices would appear to impact significantly on the endeavour. Problems 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 all revolve around questions of interaction – from the perspectives of teacher-student exchange; student participation; classroom dynamics; engagement and motivation, giving rise to the idea that cooperative and collaborative learning, posited as the most determinant and identifiable element of CLIL teaching since its inception (Papaja, 2011; Pavesi et al., 2001), may be largely absent. An over-dependence on conventional, teacher-fronted lecturing seemed to be a key obstacle, an issue that needed to be taken into account in the survey design. Combining Pavesi et al.’s (2001) hypothesis with the main obstacles highlighted in Contero’s study (2017) in order to shape the ideal didactic style of a CLIL lecturer, culmin- ated in four main perceptions described as follows:
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15 Lee mas

Effects of cognitive restructuring and study skills training on anxiety and academic achievement

Effects of cognitive restructuring and study skills training on anxiety and academic achievement

causes of effectiveness of cognitive restructuring and study skills training interventions on students’ state and trait anxiety could be related to the students’ coping skills. Coping skills refers to the ways in which a person attempts to change circumstances or his interpretations of circumstances, to make them more favourable and less threatening (Folkman & Lazarus, 1991; Lazarus, 1999; Lazarus, 2000). Lazarus and Folkman (1984) classified two basic types of coping approach as problem focused and emotion-focused coping. Problem-focused coping is aimed at managing or changing a threatening or harmful stressor. This coping strategies tend to be most effective when person can exercise some control over the stressful condition or circumstances (Park, Armeli, & Tennen, 2004). Emotion-focused coping strategies will be applied when a person think that nothing can be done to alter a situation with regards to the efforts toward relieving or regulating the emotional impact of the stressful situation. However, when coping is effective, people can adapt to the situation due to stress and anxiety will reduce (Hockenbury & Hockenbury, 2007).
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10 Lee mas

This is Broomhall, Sheffield, UK: A critical, class & qualitative community profiling to analyse community information needs, and providers

This is Broomhall, Sheffield, UK: A critical, class & qualitative community profiling to analyse community information needs, and providers

1. The continuation of the study towards the creation of an integral analytical model for Library and Information Science or The Eratosthenes Research Spirit model for LIS. In the last few years the author (Muela-Meza, 2008; 2007; 2006a; 2005b; 2005c; 2004b) has been working towards the creation of this model, to be used as a theoretical framework for LIS practitioners and researchers. This model would combine (or ‘triangulate’) concepts from the natural sciences, the social sciences, and humanities, in order to obtain a comprehensive, and integral analysis of LIS phenomena. This model in progress assumes that LIS research phenomena should not be studied only from a LIS theoretical perspective, but also from perspectives other than LIS. This thesis is a clear example of the configuration of the historically grounded model, in that it has been inspired by Eratosthenes (ancient Greece, 246 BC). Eratosthenes was a classical librarian or LIS practitioner and researcher, geographer, poet, humanist, and scientist. However, the author came to know about him from authors other than LIS authors: for example, US astronomer Carl Sagan (2001), Armenian-Mexican astronomer Shahen Hacyan (1986), and Italian philosophers Giovanni Reale and Dario Antiseri (2004a). 2. Further research into the informal information networks of people who act like/as if they were gateways to information. As explained in Chapter 5 relating to the provision of information of cultural information needs, the traditional documental information institutions (DIIs) such as libraries, or the Citizens’ Advice Bureau (CAB) did not satisfy adequately the widest range of cultural information needs. In such a case there are intercultural gateways within the neighbourhood which might satisfy community’s cultural information needs. From data several names of
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204 Lee mas

Adoption of Center TOR: The Terms of reference of Center " was revised and adopted during the Meeting for Preparation and Adoption of the Terms of Reference of the Regional Training and Research Center for Central and West Asia" which was held on 27-28

Adoption of Center TOR: The Terms of reference of Center " was revised and adopted during the Meeting for Preparation and Adoption of the Terms of Reference of the Regional Training and Research Center for Central and West Asia" which was held on 27-28

The special needs of the countries in the region in terms of training and research to meet the major challenges, including drought and other natural disasters, which have caused serious adverse impacts on wetlands and their dependent species, including water birds, as acknowledged in Resolution VIII.35, is recognized and establishing mechanisms for cooperation and coordination will play a significant role in assisting Contracting Parties in West and Central Asia to fulfill the objectives of the Strategic Plan 2003-2008 of the Convention;

8 Lee mas

Applying A Methodology For Educating Students With Special Needs: A Case Study

Applying A Methodology For Educating Students With Special Needs: A Case Study

Assistive technologies: To be able to use ICT as a teaching aid, pupil-system interaction will need to be altered. This modification will depend on the pupil‘s abilities, the platform‘s possibilities and the defined teaching methodology. Assistive technology refers to all those technological elements that aim to improve the abilities of people whose performance is, for any reason whatsoever, below average for the population of the same age and sex as a whole. Within the framework of ICT use by pupils with SEN, these assistive technologies are defined as tools that enable and/or improve the use of ICT by pupils for the purpose of learning. They can be hardware or software technologies and be just as wide- ranging and diverse as applications and pupils‘ needs and levels are. The selection of the best technology calls for a thorough and complex decision-making process to assure proper and effective use by each pupil.
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6 Lee mas

Cooperative Research As a Strategy for University Teacher Training. A Case Study of Lesson and Learning Study

Cooperative Research As a Strategy for University Teacher Training. A Case Study of Lesson and Learning Study

Secondly, fully aware that the mere theoretical intervention between the content of the disciplinary modules, the read and commented external experiences and the individual accounts was not enough to explain and help reconstruct practical knowledge, at least that of the students who were not working teachers, we proposed including a internship as part of the master's degree. This internship would take place at the start of the academic year, meaning the real experiences involved in them could be analysed and reflected upon in the courses. Students would dedicate two whole weeks to the observation, development and analysis of educational practice, either their own, in the case of working teachers, or other people's, for those who had just finished their studies. Thirdly we proposed using an educational social network to stimulate participation and collaboration amongst our students.
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8 Lee mas

Neuromuscular efficiency of the knee joint muscles in the early-phase of strength training: effects of antagonist’s muscles pre-activation

Neuromuscular efficiency of the knee joint muscles in the early-phase of strength training: effects of antagonist’s muscles pre-activation

exercises when compared to conditions without the pre-activation. Additional studies using surface electromyography (sEMG) during pre- activation of antagonist muscles also demonstrated neural responses after the resistance training, such as an increased EMG activity of the agonist muscle after the activation of the antagonists (Jeon et al., 2001; Maynard & Ebben, 2003; Robbins et al., 2010). It is worth mentioning that the EMG signal amplitude is related to motor units activation by neural firing rate and, consequently, could be associated with the values of maximum torque (David, Mora, & Perot, 2008; Hassani et al., 2006). _For instance, Baker and Newton (2005) demonstrated increases of 4.7% of the capacity to generate power after bouts of eight repetitions using the pre-activation of upper limbs antagonist muscles. According to the authors, the results were explained by an increased firing rate of the agonist muscles, influenced by a neural stimulation of the prior antagonistic contraction.
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9 Lee mas

TítuloEffects of movement imitation training in Parkinson's disease: a virtual reality pilot study

TítuloEffects of movement imitation training in Parkinson's disease: a virtual reality pilot study

Some of the motor impairments in PD results from dysfunction at the motor cortex (M1) intracortical networks emerging secondary to basal ganglia (BG) dysfunction [2]. The functional integrity of these networks can be evaluated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A TMS-pulse delivered on M1 during muscle contraction generates a silent-period (SP) on the ongoing-EMG activity; this reflects the integrity of inhibitory GABAb circuits in the motor cortex [3]. Also, the motor evoked potential (MEP)- amplitude induced by the stimulation increases in size with pulse-intensity, thus it is possible to build-up an I/O curve indicating the excitability of the system [4]. These explorations in PD indicate deficits in the cortical inhibitory control, reflected as a shortened SP duration and a steeper input–output (I/O) curve [2] and [4]. These deficits might be modified by motor-practice (MP) [5] and action-observation protocols [6].
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13 Lee mas

The last 20 years of visual anthropology – a critical review

The last 20 years of visual anthropology – a critical review

A glance at the listings of films shown at an ever- increasing number of ethnographic film festivals or those discussed in the literature demonstrates that being an academic anthropologist, or even having some training in anthropology, is not necessary to produce a film that will be accepted by many visual anthropologists as being ethnographic. In Anthropological excellence in film, a 1995 review of films selected by the Society for Visual Anthropology for screening at the American Anthropological Association meetings, over half of the films have no anthropologist listed as being involved in the production (Blakeley and Williams 1995). In 1976, Heider suggested that almost any film about human beings could be considered ethnographic. To confuse the matter even more, some film-makers call their films ‘ethnographic’ or ‘anthropological’ as a marketing ploy. I believe there is widespread confusion between films that when properly contextualized can be used as teaching devices, and films intentionally produced to have anthropological content. One can successfully teach with almost any film, fiction or non-fiction. I have used feature fiction films like Hal Ashby’s Being There in class to discuss concepts like culture and
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13 Lee mas

An interdisciplinary study in initial teacher training

An interdisciplinary study in initial teacher training

Esta experiencia de innovación educativa universitaria muestra el trabajo interdisciplinario y conjunto llevado a cabo en los estudios del Bàtxelor Ciencias de la educación de la Unive[r]

8 Lee mas

Camper

Camper

b) 1991-1993: There was a slight drop in growth (1.9% in 1991 compared with the extraordinary figure for the previous financial year, followed by a new drop of 6.17% in 1992), although the firm continued to manufacture over eight hundred thousand pairs of shoes. During this three year period, Camper forged a solid presence in international markets. Market expansion became a leading priority for the firm, implying big internal changes: the greater professionalization of its management system, the incorporation of new highly skilled technical staff with international experience, and the collaboration of an important group of Mallorcan designers. In keeping with the footwear’s Mediterranean links, Fluxá Rosselló gathered together a strong team of people from the area who shared the same vision as he and could help boost his projects (with some of these professionals forming part of the firm’s management team). The firm’s early range of footwear was reinforced, and Camper continued to develop a concept that had been present right from the very beginning, which gradually became clear in its advertising campaigns: the definition of a place of origin, emphasis on a mixture of traditional and new values, and the clear identification of a brand image. This was seen as a strategy that differentiated the firm’s products from those of rival businesses, as the industrialist himself explained:
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30 Lee mas

LA UNIVERSIDAD EN CAJAMARCA Y SU INVOLUCRAMIENTO CON LA JUSTICIA INTERCULTURAL: “UNA FORMA DE GARANTIZAR EL DERECHO A LA IDENTIDAD ÉTNICA Y CULTURAL”

LA UNIVERSIDAD EN CAJAMARCA Y SU INVOLUCRAMIENTO CON LA JUSTICIA INTERCULTURAL: “UNA FORMA DE GARANTIZAR EL DERECHO A LA IDENTIDAD ÉTNICA Y CULTURAL”

This test shows the importance of academic training of lawyers and incorporation into their curricula courses related to intercultural justice, promoting the study an[r]

8 Lee mas

Training as a factor of business excellence

Training as a factor of business excellence

In the current business context, one of the most pressing concerns is the pursuit of competitive advantage. The companies that are durable over time will be those that can transform their organisations and adapt themselves to the changeable nature of the business environment, to increasing competition, and to the ever- evolving needs of clients. In this context, the authors believe that training can be one of the principal variables that contribute to the advantage which separates a business from its competitors. Bearing these issues in mind, success depends on abilities and education, giving rise to the need for the continuous development and updating of skills (Drucker, 1993; Handy, 1997).
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26 Lee mas

SKODA – Swot analysis in action

SKODA – Swot analysis in action

A SWOT analysis brings order and structure to otherwise random information. The SWOT model helps managers to look internally as well as externally. The information derived from the analysis gives direction to the strategy. It highlights the key internal weaknesses in a business, it focuses on strengths and it alerts managers to opportunities and threats. Skoda was able to identify where it had strengths to compete. The structured review of internal and external factors helped transform Skoda UK's strategic direction.

6 Lee mas

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