PDF superior CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

9. The DSG emphasised that the STRP’s main function is to establish and supervise the delivery of work requested of it. Thus, members will: identify individuals/experts within their networks to conduct the work, oversee the processes and review the outputs. He stressed the importance of keeping in mind any relevant work being done by other organisations before engaging in substantial work, to avoid duplication of efforts. He highlighted that before embarking on products for the Conference of the Parties such as Draft Resolutions (DRs), members should, as a first step, in line with the STRP modus operandi, issue a Briefing Note (BN) and seek the feedback of Contracting Parties (CPs) to ensure that any DRs would address their needs. The role of working group leads would be to ensure that this process is followed. He mentioned that as a result of the aforementioned concerns and at the request of the STRP Chair, draft Term s of Reference (TOR) for STRP members and participants had been drafted and circulated, as DOC. STRP17-03, for the Panel’s feedback.
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RAMSAR CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

RAMSAR CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

Notes. The last attention to invasive species by the Convention was at COP8 (2002) which adopted Resolution VIII.18 on Invasive species and wetlands. To accompany this, during the 1999-2002 triennium, the STRP (with task lead IUCN) had prepared a guide to the available guidance on invasive species and wetlands, for wetland managers, which was intended to be provided to COP8 as a Information Paper. However, this document was withdrawn at the stage of its consideration by the Standing Committee prior to COP8, owing to issues concerning due process in the adoption by CBD COP of guidelines on invasive species. Under this task the STRP should revisit that earlier draft guidance document and consider how it could be updated and made available to parties.
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 36 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 36 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

17. It may be argued that the Secretariat similarly possesses an international personality, separate from that of UNEP, as a treaty body which is directed by and answerable to the Conference of the Parties. The Secretariat is not a programme within the primary structure of UNEP and is not guided by the Governing Council of UNEP. Indeed, it is UNEP’s responsibility to ensure that the Secretariat has the autonomy needed to perform its functions under the Convention and in accordance with the policy, budgetary and operational guidance it receives from the Conference of the Parties. UNEP does not speak for CITES in international meetings. Rather, the Secretariat participates as an independent entity in such fora, speaking on behalf of the Convention and its Parties.
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

17. FURTHER AWARE that in many societies the role of women in relation to family health issues, food preparation, and water collection, and thereby their potential exposure to diseases and contaminants in water and wetlands, gives them a particular role in relation to health in the community, and that they may also be at a higher risk of ill health due to their particular vulnerability, for example, during pregnancy;

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

1. This Framework has been developed by the Ramsar Convention’s Scientific & Technical Review Panel in response to the request from the Contracting Parties in Resolution VIII.8 (2002) on Assessing and reporting the status and trends of wetlands, and the implementation of Article 3.2 of the Convention; paragraph 17 of which “ALSO REQUESTS the STRP to prepare further consolidated guidance on the overall process of detecting, reporting and

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

15. ENCOURAGES Contracting Parties to identify the capacity, expertise and technical information which are needed, particularly in relevant public sector and local government institutions, to address the specific issues and potential impacts of the energy sector on wetlands as described in this document; FURTHER ENCOURAGES Contracting Parties to implement, through the Ramsar Regional Wetland Centres and where necessary through partnerships with public, private and NGO sector organizations, appropriate training and capacity building programmes in order to strengthen if necessary regulatory oversight of energy sector activities and to enhance application of guidance for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) contained in Resolution X.17, as well as application of the guidelines in Resolution VIII.1 on allocation and management of water for maintaining the ecological functions of wetlands; and REQUESTS the Secretariat, in collaboration with the Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP), the CEPA Oversight Panel, the Regional Initiatives and Contracting Parties to support, resources permitting, Contracting Parties‟ training and capacity building efforts;
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 40 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 40 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

• Intensifying our working relationships with the United Nations agencies and ongoing processes, including UNEP, EMG and UN-Water, UN-Habitat, World Meteorological Organization, GEF, and World Bank. However, integrating wetland issues into the work of the Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) remains challenging. The Convention will be understood and wetlands recognized as key assets for sustainable development only if the Contracting Parties emphasize their importance during global debates such as UN General Assemblies, CSD Sessions, Climate Change deliberations and other priority areas for decisions and actions. In this regard, the Secretariat continues to seize any opportunity to explain the importance of wetlands and to convey the key messages of the Changwon Declaration to five major sectors, covering:
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

environmental impact assessments, using appropriate techniques, including those that Contracting Parties may have developed, and in a manner consistent and in harmony with the Convention, internationally agreed development goals, and other relevant international obligations, in order to ensure that the full range of ecosystem services is considered in cost-benefit analyses related to all relevant phases of extractive industrial activities, with particular attention to the potential costs associated with the post-closure phase of extractive industrial activities;

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

5. RECOGNIZING the urgent need for governments, international organizations, the private sector and civil society to understand more fully the roles they can and should play in securing the future health of wetlands and the maintenance of their ecological character, in relation to the global commitments made under the Ramsar Convention, and the need to develop more effective cross-sectoral action to secure this;

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

13. Similarly, it is increasingly important for Parties to broaden their representation in Ramsar implementation, and frequently to raise the level of that representation, to involve those other sectors of government more closely in working towards the Convention’s mission. In some Parties, the Ramsar authorities may come from essentially a niche office in some larger agency, possibly an agency not directly involved with environmental policy-making. In those cases Parties should take steps to include higher-level decision-making officials in their wetland policy-making deliberations.
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 35 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 35 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

Resolutions/Recommendations. Many of the specific concerns and requested actions will be no longer current; but discovering the true situation in that regard will depend to a large extent on materials such as National Reports to subsequent COPs, Advisory Mission reports and general correspondence, etc., rather than necessarily being contained in subsequent COP decision texts. Some elements, such as expressions of concern about a particular instance of damage or loss, or approval of positive steps that have been taken, remain as a valid record of the COP’s view of past events. Some sites or cases feature in several successive COP decisions as a long-running story advances, but the ‘audit trail’ of that story may be useful to retain, even if some messages are repeated. An option would therefore be to propose leaving such Resolutions/Recommendations ‘on the books’ in their original form.” Again an attitude should probably be struck on the principle of this.
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

43. INSTRUCTS the STRP, in its more comprehensive examination of climate change and wetland issues, to review emerging information on the ways in which, inter alia, changes in wetland thermal and chemical regimes, hydro-patterns, and increases in water storage and conveyance infrastructure, including impoundments, potentially alter the pathways by which non-native species invade wetlands, and influence their spread, persistence and ecological impacts on native species, and to liaise with the Arctic Council on an assessment of the vulnerability of Arctic wetlands to climate change and the development of
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 41 st Meeting of the Standing Committee

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 41 st Meeting of the Standing Committee

29. Procedurally, this distinction means that those Parties and organizations recognized by a COP decision as permanent observers are automatically invited and admitted to meetings of the Standing Committee as observers, rather than following the procedure for other categories of Standing Committee observers – they need not request admission as observers and be formally admitted to a Standing Committee meeting by decision of the Committee at the beginning of each meeting. Under the relevant COP Rule of Procedure (Rule 6.2), “Such observers may, upon the invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any meeting unless at least one third of the Parties present at the meeting object.” As this applies to the Standing Committee, observers can be admitted on the invitation of the Chair of Standing Committee unless at least one third of voting members of the Committee present at the meeting object to their admission.
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The Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) Montreux Record - Questionnaire

The Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) Montreux Record - Questionnaire

populations of bean goose Anser fabalis and coot Fulica atra. During spring and autumn migrations there gather there such species e.g. bean goose Anser fabalis – about 20% of the population on migration tract, white-fronted goose Anser albifrons - 6% of the migrating population, mallard Anas platyrhynchos, coot Fulica atra and whooper swan Cygnus cygnus – more than 3% of the migrating population, and mute swan Cygnus olor – more than 4% of the migrating population. It has also one of most important breeding site in Poland for gadwall Anas strepera, garganey A.querquedula, mallard A. platyrhynchos, greylag goose Anser anser (380-540) and coot Fulica atra (up to 6000 pairs).
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

“Mr President, the Turkish delegation would like to refer to the whole document ‘Ramsar COP10 DR. 19, Rev.1’ including the annex titled ‘Consolidated Guidance for integrating wetland conservation and wise use into river basin management’. As we mentioned in our previous intervention (01.11.2008), there are various phrases which are ‘shared aquifer’, ‘shared river basin’, ‘sharing a drainage basin’, ‘shared water resources’ and ‘international river basin’. In this context, my delegation suggested to replace the words ‘shared’, ‘sharing’, and ‘international’ with the word ‘transboundary’ in the whole draft resolution. Unfortunately, my delegation was not able to see that, those amendments are not reflected in the mentioned document. Also, the explanatory note at the beginning of the Annex, page 4 of the English version, as well as in footnote 2 on page 13 of the revised text, is not acceptable to my delegation.
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

STRATEGY 1.4 Cross-sectoral recognition of wetland services. Increase recognition of and attention in decision-making to the significance of wetlands for reasons of biodiversity conservation, water supply and quality, coastal protection, integrated coastal zone management, environmental flows, environmental integrity, flood defense, climate change mitigation and/or adaptation, food security, poverty eradication, tourism, cultural heritage, and scientific research, by developing and disseminating methodologies to achieve wise use of wetlands.

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 37

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 37

Swiss comment: A Headquarters Agreement was signed between Germany, the UN and the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. If the govering body of the Convention was to decide to have the Secretariat administered by UNEP, no Headquarters Agreement would be needed: The Secretariat would be regarded to be a UN-entity and thus benefit from the provisions of the Headquarters Agreement between Switzerland and the UN. For example, this means that the UNEP administered conventions secretariats having their seat in Geneva are not governed by any agreement which is different than the general Headquarters Agreement with the United Nations.
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

17. Because correlation does not prove causation, however, it is not possible to unequivocally conclude that Ramsar designation per se increases conservation prospects. Given that the purpose of the Ramsar designation is precisely to increase the conservation and wise use of these sites, on the other hand, this hypothesis is consistent with the data. An alternative hypothesis could be that wetland conservation in general has improved over the last decade, and thus the observed result could have occurred even without Ramsar

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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) COP10

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) COP10

The Swiss Government, in addition to paying its annual contibutions, allows the Secretariat to retain for the Ramsar core budget the income tax that would have been owed by the non-Swis[r]

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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

28. FURTHER REQUESTS the STRP to ensure that adequate consideration of agriculture and wetland issues is incorporated into other relevant areas of work that the STRP may be dealing with, including global climate change, groundwater and its interaction with surface water, toxic chemicals, and desertification, as a contribution in the latter case to the implementation of the Memorandum of Cooperation between Ramsar and CCD;

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