PDF superior CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) COP10

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) COP10

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) COP10

The Swiss Government, in addition to paying its annual contibutions, allows the Secretariat to retain for the Ramsar core budget the income tax that would have been owed by the non-Swis[r]

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

412. The Secretary General recalled his first visit to the Republic of Korea in November 2007. Since then, the Secretariat had worked very closely with the government of Korea and especially with the members of the Task Force for COP10, to whom sincere thanks were due. The Secretariat and Task Force had worked as a team and special thanks were due to Ms Jiyoung Hwang, who spent six months based in Switzerland facilitating the team effort. It had really been a pleasure to work with the Republic of Korea, which had shown the warmest hospitality from the bottom to the top. It was especially significant that the President of the Republic had visited COP10 in person, thereby demonstrating the highest political commitment to Korea’s policy Green Growth. The Ramsar Centre for East Asia, the Wetland Foundation, and the Centre on Cultural Aspects of Wetlands were all signs of implementation of the Green Growth Initiative, as was the Changwon Declaration. In closing Mr Tiéga renewed his thanks and appreciation from the heart for all the efforts made by the government and people of the Republic of Korea.
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

20. URGES Contracting Parties to apply, as appropriate, the guidance adopted through Resolution X.16 and included in COP10 DOC. 27 when extractive industrial activities may directly or indirectly impact Ramsar sites; to consider a precautionary approach when the SEA or EIA predicts any substantial or irreversible loss of wetland ecosystem services, and where appropriate, to consider compensation in accordance with national legislation and Resolution VII.24 Compensation for lost wetland habitats and other functions (1999) and

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

4. In the Strategic Plan 1997-2002 it was explicitly acknowledged that each Contracting Party would be free to choose the extent to which it would implement the Plan, the level of resources that it would allocate to doing so, and the pace of its actions, but nonetheless it was agreed that the adoption of the Plan represented a strong commitment on the part of all of the Parties to achieve the Convention’s mission across a broad array of concerns and activities. Strategically, a very wide net was cast, but the hierarchical construction of the Plan gave it a certain sense of prioritization amongst so many areas of concern.
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

12. STRONGLY URGES Contracting Parties and other governments to bring the “Changwon Declaration” to the attention of their heads of state, parliaments, private sector, and civil society, and to encourage them and all government sectors (including inter alia water management, human health, climate change, poverty reduction, and spatial planning sectors) and agencies responsible for activities affecting wetlands, especially in order to respond to the call for action for wetlands embodied in the Declaration;

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

43. INSTRUCTS the STRP, in its more comprehensive examination of climate change and wetland issues, to review emerging information on the ways in which, inter alia, changes in wetland thermal and chemical regimes, hydro-patterns, and increases in water storage and conveyance infrastructure, including impoundments, potentially alter the pathways by which non-native species invade wetlands, and influence their spread, persistence and ecological impacts on native species, and to liaise with the Arctic Council on an assessment of the vulnerability of Arctic wetlands to climate change and the development of
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

ii) Develop guidance on mitigation of and compensation for losses of wetland area and wetland values, in the context of Resolution X.16 on A Framework for processes of detecting, reporting and responding to change in wetland ecological character, including lessons learned from available information on implementation of “no net loss” policies, the “urgent national interest” test, and other aspects relating to situations in which Article 2.5 and 4.2 and/or Resolution VII.24 are relevant;

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Healthy wetlands, healthy people”

17. FURTHER AWARE that in many societies the role of women in relation to family health issues, food preparation, and water collection, and thereby their potential exposure to diseases and contaminants in water and wetlands, gives them a particular role in relation to health in the community, and that they may also be at a higher risk of ill health due to their particular vulnerability, for example, during pregnancy;

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 37

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 37

AEWA/CMS explained the staff mobility policy within the UN, which requires that staff do not spend more than five years in same position depending on the availability of posts within the organization. They also complained about the recruitment process, which can sometimes take up to one and a half years for professional positions; there are ways to avoid this situation, however, through L positions for which one doesn’t have to go through a long process, and decisions can be taken by the Executive Secretary of the Convention.

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The Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) Montreux Record - Questionnaire

The Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) Montreux Record - Questionnaire

populations of bean goose Anser fabalis and coot Fulica atra. During spring and autumn migrations there gather there such species e.g. bean goose Anser fabalis – about 20% of the population on migration tract, white-fronted goose Anser albifrons - 6% of the migrating population, mallard Anas platyrhynchos, coot Fulica atra and whooper swan Cygnus cygnus – more than 3% of the migrating population, and mute swan Cygnus olor – more than 4% of the migrating population. It has also one of most important breeding site in Poland for gadwall Anas strepera, garganey A.querquedula, mallard A. platyrhynchos, greylag goose Anser anser (380-540) and coot Fulica atra (up to 6000 pairs).
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 40 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 40 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

Committee). This is a hopeful process led by the Minister of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and Landscape Management. The Secretariat strongly supports this process, chiefly through the participation of the Secretary General in the launch of the process on 6 April 2009 and subsequent inputs from the Senior Advisor for Europe. This initiative is bringing together relevant ministries and governmental organizations, including agencies in charge of water and costal areas, local authorities, NGOs and representatives of users of wetlands, land, water, and biodiversity. It is implementing Resolution X.29, Clarifying the functions of agencies and related bodies implementing the Convention at the national level. The establishment of this national platform enables the Ramsar Administrative Authority to liaise with other competent government agencies with responsibilities relevant to wetlands, water, land, biodiversity and other natural resource issues, with a view to strengthening the implementation of the Ramsar Convention.
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 36 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 36 th Meeting of the Standing Committee

17. It may be argued that the Secretariat similarly possesses an international personality, separate from that of UNEP, as a treaty body which is directed by and answerable to the Conference of the Parties. The Secretariat is not a programme within the primary structure of UNEP and is not guided by the Governing Council of UNEP. Indeed, it is UNEP’s responsibility to ensure that the Secretariat has the autonomy needed to perform its functions under the Convention and in accordance with the policy, budgetary and operational guidance it receives from the Conference of the Parties. UNEP does not speak for CITES in international meetings. Rather, the Secretariat participates as an independent entity in such fora, speaking on behalf of the Convention and its Parties.
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 41 st Meeting of the Standing Committee

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 41 st Meeting of the Standing Committee

14. However, this is not recommended as an approach, since it would break the link between the COP Rules of Procedure and the Standing Committee’s Rules of Procedure. The existing linkage recognized in Resolution VII.1 ensures that any change in Parties’ views about Convention procedures which are decided by the sovereign body (COP) translate automatically to the delegated body (Standing Committee).

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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

10. In Resolution X.25, the Conference of the Parties i) called upon Parties to apply EIA and SEA to assess the potential impacts, benefits and risks, including drainage, of proposed biofuel crop production schemes affecting Ramsar Sites and other wetlands, and ii) strongly urged Parties to “consider the full range and value of ecosystem services and livelihoods provided by wetlands and the biodiversity they support, and to consider the trade-offs between these services alongside cost benefit analysis and make use of, as appropriate, the application of the precautionary approach as defined in Principle 15 of the 1992 Rio Declaration on Environment and Development”.
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Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) “Wetlands: home and destination”

STRATEGY 1.4 Cross-sectoral recognition of wetland services. Increase recognition of and attention in decision-making to the significance of wetlands for reasons of biodiversity conservation, water supply and quality, coastal protection, integrated coastal zone management, environmental flows, environmental integrity, flood defense, climate change mitigation and/or adaptation, food security, poverty eradication, tourism, cultural heritage, and scientific research, by developing and disseminating methodologies to achieve wise use of wetlands.

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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

69. Lew Young (Ramsar SRA, Asia-Oceania) summarised the following STRP-related issues and needs in his regions: 1) ensuring the STRP is working on the priorities identified by CPs; 2) the STRP needs to better connect and coordinate with the work of other MEAs, IOPs, regional and in-country expertise (e.g., STRP NFPs); 3) the Panel should try to involve CPs in the development and testing of guidance to ensure that it is useful and relevant; 4) guidance should be in an accessible format for CPs and partners. He stressed that there are many regional organisations that can help provide a regional perspective to the STRP’s work. He then summarised the following priorities in the region: 1) CEPA Task 1: ‘Assessing and supporting capacity-building needs of CPs in applying guidance’ (a top priority in both Asia and Oceania); 2) Strategic, emerging and ongoing issues Task 10: ‘Invasive species and wetlands’ (a top priority in Oceania); 3) Wetlands and water resource management Tasks 43 and 44: ‘The role of biodiversity and wetlands in the global water cycle’ and a Ramsar ‘strategy for engaging in the global water debate’ (top priorities in Asia); 4) Wetlands and ecosystem benefits/services Task 59: ‘Economics of wetland ecosystem services/benefits’ (a top priority in Asia and Oceania). He also stated that in Asia, advice concerning the application of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation Plus (REDD+) for forested wetlands was a priority, and that in Oceania online Convention-reporting mechanisms and harmonising MEAs’ information systems (Tasks 14 and 23) at the national level were identified as top priorities.
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RAMSAR CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

RAMSAR CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) 17

Notes. The last attention to invasive species by the Convention was at COP8 (2002) which adopted Resolution VIII.18 on Invasive species and wetlands. To accompany this, during the 1999-2002 triennium, the STRP (with task lead IUCN) had prepared a guide to the available guidance on invasive species and wetlands, for wetland managers, which was intended to be provided to COP8 as a Information Paper. However, this document was withdrawn at the stage of its consideration by the Standing Committee prior to COP8, owing to issues concerning due process in the adoption by CBD COP of guidelines on invasive species. Under this task the STRP should revisit that earlier draft guidance document and consider how it could be updated and made available to parties.
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

15. TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION the information and guidance contained in the Ramsar Handbooks for the wise use of wetlands, especially the Guidelines for integrating wetland conservation and wise use into river basin management adopted by the 7th Conference of the Contracting Parties, as well as the River Basin Initiative being developed jointly by the Secretariats of this Convention and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and Ramsar COP7 Resolutions VII.8 and VII.21, paragraph 15;

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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

68. Thus, whilst this paper makes only occasional reference to non-climate related pressures to wetlands, it must be recognised that climate change will act in conjunction with a range of other pressures, many of which, depending on the region, may pose far greater immediate concern for wetlands and their water resources in the short to medium term. However, as stated earlier, it is outside the scope of this report to integrate impacts of climate change with those of other components of global change, or indeed, the many pressures that affect wetlands locally. Analyses of the combined effect of all such pressures is required before an accurate analysis of effects on all wetland types due to climate change alone can be clearly identified. The exception in this regard may be coral reefs. These have already been recognised as undergoing increased degradation, and have been a focus of attention for the analysis of climate change impacts (Wilkinson 1999).
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CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

CONVENTION ON WETLANDS (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

A5. In order to emphasize the importance of the peatland resource, and to provide the baseline information necessary to assist Contracting Parties and others in their delivery of Global Action for Peatlands, a global database of peatlands should be established and made widely accessible to Contracting Parties and others. The database should be compiled in the first instance from sources of existing information, brought into line with the agreed standardized terminology and classification systems for peatlands, and should include baseline information on the distribution, size, quality, ecological characteristics and biological diversity of the resource.
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