PDF superior Culture, communication and environment |

Culture, communication and environment |

Culture, communication and environment |

this classification places culture in the centre to help understand that all five systems are interrelated. in the cultural system human activity is classi- fied. culture would incorporate the other systems. For example, the economic system is based on purely cultural assumptions. castoriadis (1980) points out that the ideas of culture and progress are based on western values. these va- lues have roots in the Judeo christian ideology that believes in infinity and therefore the concept of development is not finite, that is, it has no specific aim. activities and concepts like innovation also have absolute, positive value that must be applied to all spheres. this value in theory is error free, although practice shows otherwise: continued obsolescence, components incompatibi- lity, impossibility to repair computers, mobile phones, etc. there are some exceptions such as the rome club (club de roma) which in the 70’s would try to impose limits to growth, placing emphasis on fair distribution of exis- ting resources. rome club pioneered infinite growth, limitless in theory.
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10 Lee mas

Developing a Green Corporate Image: An Achievement for Competitive Advantage through Organizational Culture and Green Marketing Strategy

Developing a Green Corporate Image: An Achievement for Competitive Advantage through Organizational Culture and Green Marketing Strategy

The purpose of the present study was to identify and disclose the fact of organizational culture with environmentally and green marketing strategy can develop a green corporate image that influenced the green competitive advantage. The creation of the image of a company that cares about the community especially cares for the creation of a green environment driven by the desire of stakeholders, internal employees and community. Based on that explanation, the objective of this study is to get analysis on organization culture with environment concept that is created to build optimum motivation and able to create a positive company image and able to reach the excellence green company benefit. The findings confirm the relevance of this construct, given its ability to develop the green corporate image, through organization culture with environmentally and green marketing strategy which in turn influences on achieving green competitive advantage. From this study, it is shown that evaluated companies show the influence of each variable is still below 50%. It informs that organization culture with an environmental concept and green marketing strategy can support the company to achieve green competitive excellence, though it is still not optimum. In this institutional perspective, employees have understood the efficiency of resource utilization is important for the company; however, from the identity organization, it shows organization culture with environment concept created is not optimum in understanding the importance of green marketing. Referring to Rajput et al. (2013) that the environmental instability does not give any choice to the company but to start applying continuous green management.
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19 Lee mas

Intercultural Communication Competence through Experiential

Intercultural Communication Competence through Experiential

Approaches to intercultural communication competence (ICC) generally argue the need for objective knowledge about another culture as well as knowledge about and the ability to achieve appropriate behaviors of that target culture. Most of these approaches continue to base themselves on a conception of culture as comprehensive but static. Intercultural contact in this sense is a matter of contrasting and overcoming differences between one’s own culture and the host or target culture. other approaches, however, are adopting a more multicultural and pluricultural view of intercultural competence, and a more fluid and dynamic conceptualization of culture. These approaches tend to see the intercultural dynamic as an opportunity for “third places” to emerge where entirely new cultural knowledge and behavior can be constructed through cross-cultural contact and the interaction process in itself. This view sees cultures not as fixed entities to be learned and then copied, but rather as a hybrid and emergent phenomenon of today’s societies. What are needed, it is argued, are individuals who are more aware of their own linguaculture in a much deeper way, and who are open to exploring new identities and perspectives as part of their daily contact with others. here, the other is not only the different culture, with the emphasis on “different,” but rather the other may be anyone with whom the individual chooses to interact. This paper explores the Subculture Adaptation Project conducted with third semester students in the bilingual education program at the Institución Universitaria Colombo Americana. Students were asked to choose a subculture to which they wanted to or needed to belong, and complete a series of tasks to document the adaptation process. This exercise reveals that students who achieved the greatest degree of adaptation were those who were not limited to focusing on differences between themselves and members of the subculture. Rather, these students consistently sought out emergent third places where they could construct relationships and interactions that brought together self and other in dialogic encounters where new understandings, relationships and identities could emerge.
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25 Lee mas

Folkcomunicación y estrategias de visibilidad de los grupos sociales: Aspectos de la formación de la opinión pública en la sociedad mediática

Folkcomunicación y estrategias de visibilidad de los grupos sociales: Aspectos de la formación de la opinión pública en la sociedad mediática

Among its contributions to the understanding of logic, dynamics and processes which involve the production and reception of messages, the folkcommunication theory recovers the concept of opinion leader. Luiz Beltrão leaned on contesting the research of Lazarsfeld, Merton, Katz, who tried to show that the means of communication had direct influence on the acceptance of ideas. Beltrão’s investigations considered that the effect of the means was not as efficient as imagined, so that the influence, even if existing, was not determining. It was from this insight that Beltrão discussed the “two-level flow of communication”, considering the opinion leader’s role, an actor who was able to have some influence on the social environment. 3 Therefore, between the means of communication and the public, the leaders take the role of mediators
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15 Lee mas

Material Engagements: Science Studies and the Environmental Humanities

Material Engagements: Science Studies and the Environmental Humanities

Science studies scholarship provides models not only for engaging with scientific accounts of the environment, but for tracing the interactions between texts/language/discourse and the wider material world. Scholars in science studies bring an array of social theories, philosophical questions, and historical contexts to bear upon scientific matters, mixing analyses of literature, science, and political forces in complex ways that cannot be predicted in advance. Science studies, because it is informed by social and political theories and yet also contends with the material substances, actions, and agencies of the natural world, puts forth provocative, even jolting, methodologies and reconceptualizations. I would like to propose, then that science studies can complicate and enrich scholarship in the environmental humanities. Science studies, especially the work of Donna Haraway, Bruno Latour, Andrew Pickering, Nancy Tuana, and Karen Barad, grapples with the complex interactions between the natural and the social, the discursive and the material, the sciences and the humanities. In short, science studies offers a rich body of scholarship that forges conceptions of materiality that are neither reductive nor essentialist. These theorists, in fact, offer compelling and productive ways to trace the “mangling” of scientific and other social practices (Pickering), the “intra-action” between discourse and materiality (Barad), and the ways in which networks are “simultaneously real, like nature, narrated, like discourse, and collective, like society”(Latour). These emerging models of materiality are crucial for developing an ecocriticism that does not replicate nature/culture dualisms or reinscribe nature as a blank slate for the imaginings of culture, but instead, seeks to account for the ways in which nature and environment, as material forces, act, interact, and profoundly affect cultural systems, texts, and artifacts. Indeed, it becomes impossible to separate “nature” andculture” when we focus on the intra-actions of discursive and material forces. Even as most science studies scholarship is not, itself, environmentalist, it may provide theoretical and methodological models that foster the ethical and political project of ecocriticism—to do intellectual work that matters not only to humans, but to the more-than human world.
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6 Lee mas

Digital culture as a converging paradigm for technology and culture : challenges for the culture sector

Digital culture as a converging paradigm for technology and culture : challenges for the culture sector

Convergence has facilitated a number of different economic and social processes. Having removed the physical boundaries between different media in the digital environment, cultural and media industries have ensured a steady flow of content between different platforms and in such a way that the fusion makes sense economically. There is a growing trend towards concentration of media ownership in today’s society. Cultural and media industries exert a powerful influence in many public spheres and this tends to shape popular reality —although with a “deliberate focus to sell audiences as target demographics to advertisers” according to Deuze (2007). The digital environment, moreover, enables or facilitates user participation in the digital sphere. According to Deuze (2007, p. 247), “the same communication technologies that enable interactivity and participation are wielded to foster the entrenchment and growth of a global corporate media sys- tem that can be said to be anything but transparent, interactive or participatory”. This situation can also be interpreted in the reverse sense: digital networks provide alternative platforms for communication and this changes the position of the traditional mass media and moderates their power. With the vast amount of information available nowadays on the internet, the interested user can locate information in Google on any number of perspec- tives on any subject. Such information comes from many sources, including traditional media, the commercial sector, NGOs, the research community, cultural and educational sectors, etc.
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7 Lee mas

Extended literature review about managing communication in a MNC for knowledge sharing between the headquarters and the subsidiaries

Extended literature review about managing communication in a MNC for knowledge sharing between the headquarters and the subsidiaries

Communication has had a central effect on many aspects of corporate activities. It has made corporations look alike in certain organizational aspects (technologies, managerial style, branding, publicity, etc.) but at the same time, has a determinant role, within the understanding of global identities and local cultures (Gimenez, 2002). Multinational Corporations (MNC) function in an environment characterized by different geographical regions as well as different cultures in terms of the workforce, operations, markets and customers (Kalla, 2006). Therefore, knowledge is used across various organizational units and due to the nature of dispersed assets and resources as well as global roles and responsibilities, the Multinational Corporations create internal interdependencies that highlight the important role of communication and the share of knowledge (Van den Born, & Peltokorpi, 2010).
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25 Lee mas

Electrodance as a "being together": New forms of mediatization in the communication of youth styles

Electrodance as a "being together": New forms of mediatization in the communication of youth styles

The impact of media can be seen first and foremost in the way symbolic contents came to exert an influence over young people’s consciousness, emotions, cognitive schemes, and their bodies through particular modes of behavior, expression and public presentation. Media shaped in specific ways the communication environment that was to surround teenagers, many of whom finding the meanings that would help them make sense of their everyday experience. These meanings stemmed from different sources and were represented by a myriad of symbols, in keeping with the emerging languages, images, sounds and cultural forms of movies and popular music, just to name two conspicuous examples. For Brooker (2010: 9), Hollywood-produced movies of the early twentieth century held a cogent influence over youth by “teaching its viewers – particularly the young viewers – more specific skills of the modernist city: how to walk, and how to feel”. As a symbolic form, movies (and other cultural forms) provided teenagers with the themes, meanings and behavioral patterns which reflected and were in turn influenced by larger sets of social discourses. Much of this is also true for youth-oriented television and radio shows from the 1950s onwards, and the new musical styles such as Rock & Roll – a successful hybridization of cultural meanings rooted in both poorer Black and affluent White communities which became a cultural expression of ongoing, profound, long-lasting shifts in the strained relations between often distanced social groups. The salience of media is that it contributed decisively in varied ways to both enable and shape the cultural world of teenagers. On the other hand, in
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415 Lee mas

INTERNAL COMMUNICATION AND WORK ENVIRONMENT IN THE CITY OF GUAYAQUIL

INTERNAL COMMUNICATION AND WORK ENVIRONMENT IN THE CITY OF GUAYAQUIL

There exist 4 forms in the process of internal communication within an organization, these are: corporate communication, line management, project peer communication and team peer communication. Corporate communication is when administration gives information to their employees, about their goals, events or changes that could affect the organization, among other things. It is a one-way form of communication. Line management refers to the team meetings between the supervisors and their subordinates were they exchange information. Project peer communication is two-way communication between employees in a project. Meanwhile, team peer communication is also a two-way communication between employees, but it happens in the form of team discussion within the organization (Welch & Jackson, 2007).
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26 Lee mas

Osmoregulatory capacity of the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei at different temperatures and salinities, and optimal culture environment

Osmoregulatory capacity of the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei at different temperatures and salinities, and optimal culture environment

After temperature acclimation, shrimp were transferred from the 400 l tanks (34 ‰) to 40 l aquariums in the laboratory. In order to avoid osmotic shock, the change of the water salinity was 6 ‰ per day until the factorial experiment of six salinities (10, 16, 22, 28, 34 and 40 ‰) and four temperatures (20, 24, 28 and 32 °C) was completed. The different water salinity concentrations were obtained by the addition of Fritz Super Salt Concentration (Made in the USA). A total of 24 groups of 20 shrimp per group were apportioned and chosen at random (N total = 480). Once the adjustment to the desired temperature and salinity was completed, the shrimp remained for an addi- tional seven days period for full acclimation. This procedure was recommended by Weber and Spaargaren (1970) for Crangon cran- gon shrimp. Every day, the dissolved oxygen content in the aquariums was measured with an oxygen meter (YSI 50B, 0.01 mg l -1 ), the
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10 Lee mas

Pluralismo de género y diversidad sexual en la televisión chilena

Pluralismo de género y diversidad sexual en la televisión chilena

Another group of research on gender and communication analyzes entertainment characters in the media, demonstrating how traditional representations of gender in media culture reproduce normative roles, stereotypes and inequalities between men and women (Belmonte & Guillamón, 2008; Tortajada & Araüna, 2014; Barthes, 2017). Television programs offer images and stories about sexual identities that become very real and compete with the experience of viewers (Press, 1991; Núñez, 2005). From another side, queer studies have contributed to questioning the heterosexual paradigm that governs many stories of fiction and other audiovisual productions. It is the contribution that analytical perspectives have made on the representation of gender diversities in television or cinema. More recently, queer studies have also analyzed the domination of heterosexist ideology, i.e., the imprint of heteronormativity or the social mandate of the sex- affective complementarity of men and women with reproductive purposes (Warner, 2012). Edelman (2014) analyzes the family discourses that are part of Walt Disney’s children’s films, where the queer is represented as the infertile enemy. Also, it is established that these representations of gender do not harm only women, but “devalue everything coded as female” (Fraser, 2008,
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15 Lee mas

Democracy in the Digital Communication Environment: A Typology Proposal of Political Monitoring Processes

Democracy in the Digital Communication Environment: A Typology Proposal of Political Monitoring Processes

WikiLeaks can be considered a paradigmatic example of monitoring based on the information extraction via digital technologies. This organization emerged in 2006 but became internationally famous in 2010 when the video Collateral Murder was broadcast. This video showed a July 12, 2007 aerial attack of Baghdad in which two U.S. helicopters, an AH-64 and an Apache, opened fire on a group of civilians, killing 12, including two Reuter’s news agency employees. Reuters had lobbied unsuccessfully to obtain this video prior to the WikiLeaks publication. WikiLeaks is a platform whose stated goal is to reduce corruption and consolidate democracy through public scrutiny (Sifry, 2011). This organization distributes information that organizations and governments would prefer to keep secret. WikiLeaks has initiated some of the most notable and famous monitoring processes over the past few years by releasing secret information about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as documents from the U.S. State Department. The mass media have played a role in this process by controlling the assessments, contextualization, and ultimately, large-scale publication of the information they receive from WikiLeaks. In this manner, the mainstream media, especially elite newspapers such as The New York Times, The Guardian, Le Monde, and El País, have become megaphones for civic monitoring by enlarging the scope and social impact of such releases.
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21 Lee mas

Culture, competition, and happiness

Culture, competition, and happiness

In sum, this paper analyzes the relation between one of the most respectable institutions of capitalism, competition, and feelings of happiness, and studies if this relation varies across ethnic groups using data from the 2005 wave of the World Value Surveys (WVS). Using the WVS improves over the Brandts et.al (2005) study in that the WVS build on representative samples and avoids the problem of self-selection typical of experimental studies. It also improves over the Fischer (2008) study in that my paper considers a subjective opinion about whether an individual thinks market competition is good or harmful (see below) which, as argued above, constitutes an individual measure and it may also be considered an ex-ante opinion, independent of the actual competitive environment derived from any aggregated approximation to competition, such as the KOF globalization index.
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34 Lee mas

LA EVOLUCIÓN DE LA POLÍTICA MARÍTIMA EN LA UNIÓN EUROPEA Y EN ESPAÑA

LA EVOLUCIÓN DE LA POLÍTICA MARÍTIMA EN LA UNIÓN EUROPEA Y EN ESPAÑA

The National Council on Maritime Security, aware that currently there does not exist in Spain any system for the exchange of information in the field of National Security which would connect the different Ministries and organisms, proposes the development of the National Security information exchange platform of the Department of National Security (COLABORA) and, specific to the maritime environment, of the maritime safety and security tool SEGMAR to improve shared knowledge, a more integral knowledge of the area of Maritime Security, and in particular of the risks and threats it must cope with. This would, as well, encourage improvement of communication among the relevant actors and help them to know and trust each other more in order to establish patterns of reinforced cooperation 89 . These systems
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34 Lee mas

Acquisition and transfer of tacit knowledge of marketing in small and medium hotels

Acquisition and transfer of tacit knowledge of marketing in small and medium hotels

It was found that the standard deviation in all items is greater than 1 in the dimensional analysis; on the other hand, Cronbach’s alpha evaluated internal consistency, where the first construct “marketing-knowledge absorption capacity” yielded an alpha of 0.932. Garson (2010) comments that in social sciences the alpha cut should be 0.80 or higher for a set of elements to be considered for a scale, but it is possible to use 0.70 as acceptable for confirmatory research (Cronbach, 1951; Thiétart, 2001). In the second construct “open culture to collaboration”, the alpha was of 0.865; in the third construct “trust in co-workers”, the alpha was of 0.919; in the fourth construct “cultural distance”, the alpha was of 0.779, with this consistency being the lowest of all and as such the decision was made to eliminate it from the evaluation of the model. The lowest value was found in the fifth construct “communication media richness” with 0.816; in the sixth construct “acquisition of tacit marketing knowledge”, the alpha was of 0.943; and in the seventh and final construct “transfer of tacit marketing knowledge”, the alpha was of 0.874.
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18 Lee mas

Interview with Axel Goodbody

Interview with Axel Goodbody

Bath Spa University), where he co-organized another ecocritical conference (June 1998) together with Richard Kerridge. Again the programme was mainly focused on American and English literature and literary theory, but I met some people there who were working in German (the Australian Kate Rigby and the Lancaster historian Thomas Rohkrämer). ASLE-UK was founded at a meeting during the conference. Over the next few years, Terry Gifford convened a number of one-day ASLE-UK symposia at Bretton Hall in Yorkshire, and I served as Treasurer up to 2004. I put together a panel on German writing at the second ASLE-UK conference, which John Parham organized at the University of East London in September 2000, and there were papers on German subjects again at the next ASLE-UK conference, which Terry hosted at Bretton Hall in 2002. Val Plumwood and Leo Marx were keynote speakers, and the event attracted a range of researchers from European countries as well as the UK and the USA. At the time I was working on a 3-year project “Nature and Environment in Modern German Literature”, which was led by Colin Riordan, Professor of German at the University of Newcastle. Colin had been one of the organizers of a conference on Ecological Thought in German Culture back in 1995, but neither he nor I was aware of the existence of ecocriticism as a critical approach at the time. The NEMG project provided funds for visits to archives in Germany, and enabled me to organize a small conference on German environmental literature at the University of Bath together with Colin and Simon Meacher. Since then, ecocriticism has been the main focus of my research.
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8 Lee mas

Predicting factors of job satisfaction among Conferences of the Atlantic Union

Predicting factors of job satisfaction among Conferences of the Atlantic Union

This section is centered on the background of each of the variables contained in the research. It also addresses the question of, how generational gap, work environment, organizational culture, and spirituality affect job satisfaction. Job satisfaction is one of the most complex areas facing today’ managers (Aziri, 2011) as it relates to managing em- ployees. Job satisfaction is not only interconnected to workers getting along with each other, or has to do with as stated by Jonck and Swanepoel (2015), employment of the right personnel to complete the job in an efficient, competent, timely and professional manner. Job satisfaction also has to do with how employees feel about their job, but also about how much they enjoy what they do (Hassard, Teoh, & Cox, 2013). However, research has found that there has been a paradigm shift in the worldview of the field of Human Re- sources (HR) as it relates to the area of job satisfaction. The field of HR has broadened to accommodate new focuses that will include the importance of intangible assets, such as brand recognition and knowledge management (Crain, 2015; Jin & Rounds, 2012; Jonck & Swanepoel, 2015; Leonard, 2013).
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172 Lee mas

Drama and CLIL: a new challenge to the teaching approaches in bilingual education Nicolás Román, S  and J J  Torres Núñez  (Eds ) (2015)  Bern: Peter Lang  ISBN: 978 3 0343 1629 3  170pp

Drama and CLIL: a new challenge to the teaching approaches in bilingual education Nicolás Román, S and J J Torres Núñez (Eds ) (2015) Bern: Peter Lang ISBN: 978 3 0343 1629 3 170pp

It is no coincidence that when Hillyard, the first author of the collection, starts reflecting on the connection between drama and CLIL, both psychological aspects (like motivation, self- efficacy, etc.) and cognitive issues (e.g. thinking skills) are mentioned, as Dam anticipated. Hillyard thoroughly explains the extent to which the components accounted for in the CLIL approach (culture, learning, environment, content, language, engagement and learning outcomes) are naturally embedded in drama forms, convincingly maintaining that the use of drama in contexts of content and language integrated learning can be not only feasible from a curricular point of view (whatever the learners’ level and age), but also extremely beneficial to CLIL students, who will find a different – more dynamic, individualised, mea- ningful – way to express themselves and to transform even complex and abstract content topics into new knowledge, through a personal understanding and interpretation of facts. The selection of drama-based tasks listed at the end of the paper provides concrete tea- ching ideas to apply drama to CLIL classrooms: hopefully, examining the list, subject tea- chers will be inspired by at least some of the activity inputs described and decide to have a try, according to their discipline, curricular objectives and classroom characteristics. Motos and Field propose a different use of role-taking situations: in their paper, Playback Theatre (an original form of improvisational, unscripted theatre, where stories come from the real life of audience volunteers and immediately take artistic form through the actors’ interpretation) is presented as an educational tool to help students to express their inte- lligences and individual learning styles. Of great interest is the reflection on the choice of using a second language in Playback Theatre-based activities, which, as the authors explain, makes language learning much more effective and intensive. Being a combination of elements like physicality, thoughtfulness, creativity, language communication and use, and cultural values, this approach is recommended for CLIL contexts. Playback Theatre and CLIL are in fact described as sharing many features, from scaffolding techniques to active learning, from student cooperation to authenticity of the topic discussed. The paper closes mentioning a couple of ideas of how to apply Playback Theatre to CLIL classrooms – ideas capable of satisfying the need to enhance learners’ active role and participation in the lesson. Teachers are made aware that students need a certain level of language competence and performance skills for these kinds of activity to be profitably used, time- wise, in classroom.
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5 Lee mas

Vol. 6, Núm. 12 (2014)

Vol. 6, Núm. 12 (2014)

In communication and socio-cultural studies the most representative college, in terms of senior theses, is Universidad de Antioquia, and they come from mostly by the Social Work program. The approaches are observed around young people on issues focused on democracy, body, citizenship, lifestyle, cosmetic surgery, violence against women, as well as screenplays production and documentaries on everyday topics, youth gangs and other social topics (Audiovisual Communication and Multimedia program). Universidad de Antioquia, also leads communication and education studies, developed mainly from the Faculty of Arts, approached from visual culture, public studies and museum communication. The School of Communications conducts journalism studies, communication and social change, in which the environmental communication is timidly introduced. Universidad Cooperativa de Medellin
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19 Lee mas

TítuloKnowledge culture and communication culture

TítuloKnowledge culture and communication culture

It is clear that nowadays effective mass media counterbalance languages unmotivated signs with other types of signs and resorts to sounds and images. Vice versa, the printed book unmotivates also the para-verbal signs which belong to voice and were given supplementary indication about word significance. To give a name to this supplementary effect of un-motivation of unmotivated languages signs I use the term «digital» which was suggested by the theory of information and comes from Paul Watzlawick. The printed book, the text written in the phonetic alphabet, is made up of «digital» signs, which are more unmotivated, more arbitrary, than that of the spoken language, because they have lost speech inflection, tones and tonality, through which voice gives supplementary indication about significant meanings. Or, in order to under- stand the text written with «digital» signs, it is needed to a greater extent than for the spoken language to learn signs preliminary and consciously (Gregory Bateson). If we can understand, for example, analogical signs directly, for the written signs of the phonetic alphabet we have to learn and know it preliminary. This need to learn and know written signs before use, made utilization of this type of signs difficult, reserved this utilization to a minority in history and created a specific and special effect of knowledge. We weren’t enough aware until now that the written books «digital» quality, which are composed of more unmotivated signs than the spoken language, made modern occidental educational institutes necessary as the other half of this mass media partially born as mass media, that is the printed book.
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7 Lee mas

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