Top PDF Las Elecciones municipales de 2007 en Cataluña

Integrating Reading and Writing for Effective Language Teaching

Integrating Reading and Writing for Effective Language Teaching

collaborative strategy to help them learn from each other. The aim of employing such a strategy was to lessen the degree of the students’ apprehension because each was aware of the fact that his or her peer had difficulties in writing. The students were encouraged to raise questions and to help each other improve the content and the organization of the paragraphs rather than point out grammatical mistakes. To do so, they were advised to draw the attention of their partners indirectly by asking questions such as "What do you think about the tense?" In addition, a peer response worksheet was distributed to students, which included some questions about the content so the peer could discuss it with his or her partner. The questions were about the focus of the paragraph, logical arrangement of the ideas, and repetition of details.
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Vol 19, No 5 (2020)

Vol 19, No 5 (2020)

taken with careful consideration since students’ needs were only self-reported, and a further probe delving into the students’ actual writing when preparing to publish may be needed to confirm such result. Genre knowledge is equally essential in academic writing because it has been found to be strongly linked to students’ writing performance (Graham, 2006; Lu, 2010). In this case, if nursing students are introduced to the language and conventions of academic writing in scientific publishing in their research class, then there is a prospect that they can become genre-oriented on publication writing. All these results on academic writing needs collectively corroborate Kapborg and Berterö’s (2002) finding. It states that nursing students encounter problems relating to poor spelling and grammar, as well as inadequate structure. Moreover, previous studies (Diekelmann & Ironside, 1998; Whitehead, 2002) also found a similar result in which nursing students demonstrate little knowledge upon which to build on, and the burden of addressing demanding and conventional academic writing needs which perhaps hindered the growth of inventive and authentic work. Overall, this study provides further evidence endorsing the study of Borglin (2012), which suggested that the teaching of critical thinking and academic writing in nursing program has to take off from theoretically founded instructive models, e.g. academic literacies model by Lea and Street (1998, 2006). Indeed, research writing in nursing demands a multitude of academic literacies. Academic Reading and Writing are two of the most crucial skills that students ought to have to succeed in their writing endeavors.
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EFFECTIVENESS OF TEACHING PHONICS IN IMPROVING THE READING  AND WRITING SKILLS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE OF GRADE 4 STUDENTS IN  ENGLISH MEDIUM SCHOOL

EFFECTIVENESS OF TEACHING PHONICS IN IMPROVING THE READING AND WRITING SKILLS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE OF GRADE 4 STUDENTS IN ENGLISH MEDIUM SCHOOL

This research will encourage teachers to replace traditional teacher-centred instructional practices such as emphasis on textbooks, lectures, with knowledge of phonology and phonics teaching in schools irrespective of medium of instruction ie. may be Marathi or English medium schools. This research will retain interest of the students in learning English language. Provide opportunities for students of grade Four to use appropriate phonics knowledge.

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Working people requiring a practical knowledge of English for communicative purposes

Working people requiring a practical knowledge of English for communicative purposes

This course is designed for learners at an advanced level of English proficiency. It strengthens the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing essential for effective communication. The course provides opportunities to practice the language at a more complex level. Emphasis is on listening and speaking with confidence and the ability to sustain an active conversation on a variety of topics relevant to the learners’ daily lives.

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Effective teaching and learning : reading

Effective teaching and learning : reading

significantly between pre- and post- assessment, and those whose reading benefited more from classes reported significantly greater enjoyment of literacy. In feedback sessions learners spoke with great pride of their achievement. For example, one learner described writing the first letter ever to her brother: ‘He was shocked and said, don’t let that be the only letter you write to me!’ Another who talked about writing a book review for the first time -- ‘I was quite proud of that’ -- went on to achieve Levels 1 and 2 qualifications and to enlist for GCSE English. Such stories were not uncommon.
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“Pick And Write”: Learning through PicLits

“Pick And Write”: Learning through PicLits

facilitation of learning with a range of digital technologies. Integration of technology encourages and provides opportunities for learners to think critically and creatively. Thus, language teaching is also employing initiatives to be part of the technological advancement especially in teaching ESL. In line to that, emergence of various digital tools requires educators to identify the suitability and acceptance among the learners to ensure the effectiveness of the integration. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the students’s acceptance of using Piclits as a digital tool to help them enhance their writing skill. Hence, this study employed a survey design distributed to 32 Year 4 pupils in a primary school in Selangor. Data were gathered using a questionnaire containing 10 items to obtain perceptions from the respondents on the usage of Piclits. The collected data were then analysed and reported using frequencies and percentages. The analysis of the questionnaire survey reflected most of the pupils having a positive feedback on integrating Piclits in their writing activity. The findings would be beneficial to ESL language teachers as it could be an added resource to assist them in teaching the writing skill and encourage pupil’s interest towards getting them to write. However, it is suggested that teachers may also look into error correction feedback while using this tool as a means of enhancing writing skills among students.
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The Effect of Task-Based Approach on the Iranian Advanced EFL Learners’ Narrative vs. Expository Writing

The Effect of Task-Based Approach on the Iranian Advanced EFL Learners’ Narrative vs. Expository Writing

schemata and background knowledge, motivates the students and encourages them to write freely without any concern over formal linguistic features. It adopts a dynamic view toward the act of writing and considers all of the involved factors and processes which take place when producing an essay. Moreover, it adds more peculiar aspects to the “process writing” by its complete task cycle. It also has a complete post-task phase or “a language focus phase” in which the specific structures and forms of language are focused on. It seems that task-based language teaching (TBLT) is very effective in teaching writing to EFL learners. Task-based approach can be used in teaching paragraph writing to the intermediate students and even in teaching writing skills to the beginners due to its robust pedagogical characteristics. Task-based approach can also be employed in the teaching of letter writing to EFL learners and ESP learners in Iran, and probably in other EFL contexts. Task-based approach seems to be the best methodology for teaching collaborative learning because it is quite interactive and follows the principles of cooperative learning. And another interesting feature of task-based approach is the use of peer feedback in a non-threatening condition.
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Effective teaching and learning : reading

Effective teaching and learning : reading

A contrasting session (class 361, week 1) demonstrates how a tutor incorporated pair work into her lesson plan. After a whole-class session on advertisements and persuasive writing, the tutor handed out differentiated worksheets and attempted to pair learners who were working at the same level. The two learners at Level 1 were told, ‘Get together, get ideas from each other’. They disregarded this and worked on their own. However, when the teacher asked the two Entry Level learners to work together, one immediately moved her seat so they were sitting together. They discussed the worksheet (on adjectives) at length together and helped each other look up entries in a dictionary. When the teacher gave feedback, it was done jointly, rather than one-to-one.
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Education Courses (GRED)

Education Courses (GRED)

GRED 549 Adolescent Literature and the Teaching of Reading/ Literacy (3) This course includes: 1) intensive and extensive reading of contemporary young adult literature; 2) study and development of strategies for teaching reading, writing, speaking, and listening through the use of adolescent literature; and 3) re-structuring curricula and teaching strategies to provide for the literacy needs, interests, and abilities of all learners. Students will also work in the computer lab using and locating resources on teaching adolescent literature, constructing reading data bases, and examining instructional uses of power point and electronic communication. Offered summer, fall and spring. GRED 550 Introduction to Teaching English Language Arts, Grades 7–12 (3) A concepts-based approach will be used to provide an introduction to current theory and research on curriculum, teaching, learning, and evaluation in the secondary ELA classroom. State and national standards for the English Language Arts of reading, writing, speaking, and listening will be examined and an introduction to teaching strategies and framing school curricula to meet these standards will be explored. MST students only. Co-requisite: GRED 592. Offered fall. GRED 551 Early Child Curriculum: Integrated Math, Science and Social Studies (3) Candidates will have opportunities to apply knowledge and skills in authentic field experiences and become objective observers of the development of young children. They concurrently will have lecture classes where they will develop an understanding of Science and Mathematical concepts for the appropriate stages of the cognitive development of young children. The emphasis will be placed upon how science and math can be integrated throughout the curriculum and become valued functional tools.
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Capitalizing on Speaking Skill of EFL Learners for the Language Literacy

Capitalizing on Speaking Skill of EFL Learners for the Language Literacy

According to Siddiqui (2012) ‘English is a foreign language in Oman and its use is limited to certain educational and professional contexts. It is taught as one of the subjects in the public school curriculum. However, the medium of instruction of other subjects still remains Arabic’. The school graduates and many other adult learners who seek enrolment in foreign universities have to give the evidence of their English language proficiency because most of these Universities’s syllabus and the medium of teaching is English. The proficiency level requirement depends on the University or the Course. Most of these universities accept IELTS results (see appendix for IELTS Test level descriptors). Equal weight is given to each skill in this test that includes listening, speaking, reading, and writing and the total band (score) is the average of all the skills.
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The Effect of Interactive Read-alouds on Language Learners’ Development of Writing Skill

The Effect of Interactive Read-alouds on Language Learners’ Development of Writing Skill

Read-aloud helps students construct the required knowledge for successful reading and develop their vocab- ulary and comprehension (Press et al., 2011). It is “an ef- fective way to introduce students to the joy of reading and the art of listening … while developing their vocabularies, experiential backgrounds, and their concepts of print and story” (Fisher, Flood, Lapp, & Frey, 2004, pp. 8-9). One advantage of teaching in this way for teachers is that they can show students how reading strategies such as predicat- ing, visualization, and making judgments can be applied in reading a text (Scharlach, 2008) and how the written and spoken language are different (Hedrick & Pearish, 2003). Also, teaching reading by read-alouds helps learners focus on longer chunks of language (Amer, 1997), enjoy both reading and listening, optimize their cognitive process- ing, and understand the message faster and sooner with less cognitive load. In doing so, students are engaged in an ongoing dialogue with others, when they can speak out their insights, understandings and misunderstandings; and express any questions they have about the text topic and meaning, while the teacher clarifies ambiguities with his/ her way of expression, facial gesture, tone of voice, and interaction with students.
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Effective Teaching of Inference Skills for Reading

Effective Teaching of Inference Skills for Reading

Richards and Anderson (2003) published an article about the question ‘How do you know?’ They explained how this question forms the core of the strategy they devised to help young readers make inferences primarily from picture books. Some reserve should be exercised about their claims as their article was based on very small numbers and cannot be described as a rigorously conducted piece of research. In addition, their experience is that of teaching emergent readers, so their work is, strictly speaking, outside the remit of this review. However, their model would not be out-of-place in year 3 and 4 classrooms. In brief, they suggest that when an inference is drawn in discussion of a text, it should be routinely followed by the question ‘How do you know?’ Teachers should attempt to find texts rich in inferencing possibilities and to have in mind which inferences they will elicit in discussion. Our think-aloud questioning strategy helps … readers learn how to make connections between given and implied information. It helps them examine their thinking and reasoning so they can verbalise how they arrived at their assumptions and conclusions (p. 292). It depends initially upon the teacher modelling her own thinking processes to show pupils how she makes inferential leaps from text, and, as will be seen in section 3, this is entirely in keeping with currently recommended strategies. The authors claim that in bringing out into the open the assumptions upon which pupils make their inferences, one narrows the cultural and linguistic distance between the backgrounds of ethnically diverse students…student discussions about their inferences provide opportunities for second language learners to … consider peers’ disparate views and thinking(p. 292).
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Integrating Internet Based Language Laboratory in Teaching Intensive Reading at Non English Majored Graduate Level

Integrating Internet Based Language Laboratory in Teaching Intensive Reading at Non English Majored Graduate Level

As shown in Table 5, we could see that non-English-majored graduate students’ average total scores of en- trance examination (P = .008) meant that there was no significant difference according to non-English-majored graduate students’ entrance examination, as the significant difference occurs only when the probability (abbre- viated as P) is below or equal to .005. That was to say, CG and EG were at almost the same level of English pro- ficiency when they came into the university. However, after a term’s learning, changes taken place when they learned English in different environment and with different approaches. End-of-term examination (P = .004) meant that there was the significant difference between CG and EG. Oral test (P = .004) and translation (P = .002) both suggested that there were significant differences between CG and EG, but writing (P = .064) meant that there was no significant difference between CG and EG. So we can safely conclude that integrating IBLL in in- tensive reading is more useful in improving non-English-majored graduate students’ productive skills such as speaking, translation.
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Reading, Writing and Linguistics Areas in French as a Foreign Language

Reading, Writing and Linguistics Areas in French as a Foreign Language

Foreign Language(s) (FL) classes, including French as a Foreign Language (FFL) classes. Fostering foreign language skills is essential for a mid-sized emerging economy like Turkey, as foreign language learning contributes to improved national performance in the global knowledge economy [7]. But it is important to determine whether these classes are effective in helping our students become communicatively competent. Learning to read in L1 as well as L2 or any subsequent languages consists of more than learning vocabulary. Lexis is formed often as the most important area one needs to master to become a successful reader. However, one should not overlook other important complementary aspects, some of which are also mentioned by Grabe and Stoller (2002) as desirable reading strategies that should become automatized [8]. In brief, the aim of this study is to investigate the importance of linguistics, reading, and writing areas in French as a Foreign language (FFL) at the A2 (Waystage) language level.
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EFL TEACHERS' PERCEIVED BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING
HIGHER-ORDER THINKING SKILLS IN TEACHING READING: A CASE STUDY

EFL TEACHERS' PERCEIVED BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING HIGHER-ORDER THINKING SKILLS IN TEACHING READING: A CASE STUDY

The study about the integration of higher-order thinking skills (HOTS) in English language teaching has mainly focused on HOTS-based test items. Little is known about what teachers perceived about benefits and challenges in its integration. Knowing how teachers perceived benefits and challenges they encountered gives a depiction of its integration in classroom practices. This case study explores EFL teachers perceived benefits and challenges of the integration of HOTS in teaching reading. The study also seeks how teachers solve their challenges. The participants in this study are two experienced EFL teachers from a public senior high school in East Java, Indonesia. The data were collected through questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The data then were analyzed using interactive model data analysis (Miles, Huberman, & Saldaña, 2014) that included data condensation, data display, and drawing and verifying conclusions. The results of this study have implications for further teachers’ professional development related to the integration of HOTS in English language teaching.
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Reading to Learn, Learning to Write Pedagogy: How Effective is it on Teaching Narrative Writing to Non Chinese Speaking Students?

Reading to Learn, Learning to Write Pedagogy: How Effective is it on Teaching Narrative Writing to Non Chinese Speaking Students?

Reading to learn, learning to write” R2L pedagogy, originating from Australian Systemic Functional Linguistic school [4, 5], was first put forward by Rose and Martin [11], which is intended to assist Australian aboriginal students in learning English as second language [8, 9, 12]. It is a genre-based teaching method, accentuating explicit instruction of reading from the whole text level to sentence and word level in order to inform students’ genre writings and improve their literacy capacity [6, 7, 10, 13, 16]. It is highly emphasized that the meaning of language and its semantic function cannot be fully grasped by the students until helping them get into the whole text level and this is where genre starts to work, which contradicts with the traditional way of implicit teaching excessively focusing on lexical, phrasal and syntactically levels and meanwhile overlooking the importance of information delivered in the whole-text level. It also requires teachers to learn knowledge not only about pedagogy, but also about language, in order to enhance students’ language proficiency and more importantly enable their learning through language to achieve all-subject academic performance and overall development.
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A framework to build readers and writers in the second language classroom

A framework to build readers and writers in the second language classroom

Reading in a second language has not been usually successful. Aud Marin, as cited by Day, & Banford, 1998) points out: “There has been a tendency among foreign language learners to regard a text as an object for language studies and not as object for factual information, literary experience or simply pleasure, joy and delight”. In Colombia, for instance, despite the new trends in communicative teaching, reading is still practiced in most state schools to reinforce grammar, to read dialogues, words and sentences or to do literal translation of words. Those are the results reported by three research stud- ies carried out by Cardona and Quintero (1996) in Manizales, Zambrano, & Insuasty (2001) in Neiva, and Bastidas (2002) in Pasto. Those studies also showed that reading is still taught not to learn new information, that reading is confined to reading sentences in a notebook, from the blackboard or from guides or instructions to do an exercise. Meanwhile, writing is used to copy sentences from the blackboard or develop exercises or guides, requiring not much thought. Those reports also concluded that activating prior knowledge or reading with a purpose are absent of reading classes. Besides many times basic skills like scanning, and skimming are also unknown, and reading materials do not go further than the textbook.
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Voice And Dialogue In Teaching Reading/Writing To Qatari Students

Voice And Dialogue In Teaching Reading/Writing To Qatari Students

The practice of reading aloud can also facilitate unpacking the metaphorical meaning of the terms voice and dialogue in the context of reading/writing instruction. An ESL instructor may choose not to enter the realm of controversy over voice in the sense of authority or “subject position” (Elbow, 2007, p. 7). However, all students benefit from being made aware of the transactional nature of reading and writing. On the most rudimentary level, dialogic engagement with a text can be explained as creating meaning through identifying and interpreting textual clues planted by the writer. Thus it involves asking questions and “talking back” to the text. Voice annotation, “talking” with the narrator or the inhabitants of the fictional world encourages deep reading as well as self- reflection. Likewise, for a writer, imagining a dialogue with a sympathetic or adversary reader results in writing a clearer, more analytical argument (Elbow, 1981, p. 67). For all the above stated reasons, making students hear a text as a polyphony of voices, to use Bachtin’s term, can benefit both expert and novice readers and writers, regardless of whether they are using their mother tongue or a second/foreign language.
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Web Based Scaffolding Teaching of EAP Reading and Writing

Web Based Scaffolding Teaching of EAP Reading and Writing

In order to improve the teaching efficiency, more and more attention has been paid to pre-class reading. Before a dialogue between teachers and students hap- pens, students must complete the tasks preset by teachers and mark the difficul- ties and their puzzles, which is not only the academic basis for effective teach- er-student dialogue teaching, but also the key to cultivate students’ autonomous learning ability. Students can ask their classmates and instructors for consulta- tion and discussion at any time in the online virtual learning zone once they en- counter difficulties in understanding during the reading process. The problems will be solved immediately and the students can get emotional support and con- fidence, so that can continue to complete the reading task on their own initia- tive, which is difficult to achieve in a traditional classroom. Scaffolding pedagogy emphasizes the key role of “collaborative learning” in meaning construction, and collaboration should be spread in the whole teaching activities of reading. Dur- ing the independent reading process, students can also spontaneously hold an audio conference, video conference and discussion activities in online learning zone, moreover, a learning community can be set up by only several students, then they can make exchanges, so that can improve their learning consciousness, and promote the cultivation of their autonomous learning ability.
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Some specific features of communicative methods of teaching English

Some specific features of communicative methods of teaching English

Communicative Language Teaching [CLT] was introduced to develop pupils’ four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in a communicative context in Uzbekistan. CLT focuses mainly classroom activities, which based on communicative methods like group work, task-work, and filling the information gap. The issue of English language learning in primary section is a very important phenomenon for pupils. English language is taught in the primary levels to improve the basic knowledge on a foreign language. A host of variables comes into play an important role in determining the issue, which may vary from one context to another. It may be difficult to make a complete list of the variables, however, some of them are lack of proficiency of the teacher, attitudes of the pupils, socio- cultural background, and in particular, language learning policy itself.
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