PDF superior Ramsar COP10 DR 21 Draft Resolution X.21 Guidance on responding to the continued spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1

Ramsar COP10 DR 21 Draft Resolution X.21 Guidance on responding to the continued spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1

Ramsar COP10 DR 21 Draft Resolution X.21 Guidance on responding to the continued spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1

recognised that, as well as the direct impacts of HPAI H5N1 on susceptible birds, public attitudes (and therefore support for wetland conservation, particularly of Ramsar sites and other wetlands of importance for waterbirds) could be negatively affected by concerns about the possible role of waterbirds in the spread of HPAI H5N1. Parties at COP9 were also greatly concerned that in many countries there was a significant lack of information and, in some countries, public misunderstanding, about important issues related to the spread of HPAI, the risks it may pose, and how to anticipate and respond to outbreaks of HPAI. Accordingly COP9 agreed Resolution IX.23 on Highly pathogenic avian influenza and its consequences for wetland and waterbird conservation and wise use. This Resolution inter alia called on the Convention’s Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP) to develop practical advice that could assist countries in responding to this serious and rapidly developing situation. 6. In particular, Ramsar COP9 requested the STRP, with the Scientific Task Force on Avian
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Resolution X.21 Guidance on responding to the continued spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza

Resolution X.21 Guidance on responding to the continued spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza

12. STRONGLY REAFFIRMS the conclusion of Resolution IX.23 that attempts to eliminate HPAI in wild bird populations through lethal responses such as culling are not feasible and may exacerbate the problem by causing further dispersion of infected birds and that destruction or substantive modification of wetland habitats and waterbird nest sites in order to reduce contact between wild birds and humans and their domestic birds does not amount to wise use as urged by Article 3.1 of the Convention; and STRESSES that surveillance should be undertaken within the context of normal legal regulations regarding wildlife and should have minimal impact on threatened and other populations concerned; 13. ENCOURAGES all stakeholders to plan and test response strategies at various spatial
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Ramsar COP10 DR 10 Draft Resolution X.10 Future implementation of scientific and technical aspects of the Convention

Ramsar COP10 DR 10 Draft Resolution X.10 Future implementation of scientific and technical aspects of the Convention

2.9 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) – continuing review. Maintain an active overview of and input to issues relating to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI), especially in relation to surveillance, information-exchange and response strategies, including by continued participation in the Scientific Task Force on Avian Influenza and Wild Birds, and including a determination of whether lessons learnt from best practice responses to HPAI H5N1 have implications for Ramsar guidance relating to protected sites and other aspects of wetland wise use, followed by the development of any necessary proposals for modifying such guidance.
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STRP draft Resolution and guidance on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI)

STRP draft Resolution and guidance on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI)

Avian influenza is a widespread disease, which occurs naturally within some waterbird species. The spread of infection with these viruses to a range of other species, including humans, is well- known. The emergence and spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 of Asian lineage (HPAI H5N1) since 2003 has been historically unprecedented both in the extent of geographical range of the virus and its high pathogenicity to wild birds (as opposed to only domestic birds). It has had major impacts on rural livelihoods linked to the keeping of domestic birds (mainly chickens, ducks, turkeys, ostrich and quail) and on nature conservation, including mortality of waterbirds at many Ramsar sites. There have also been major concerns as to the potential for viral change that might precipitate a human influenza pandemic given the high mortality rate of people who have become infected with H5N1.
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Ramsar COP10 DR 17 Draft Resolution X.17 Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment: updated scientific and technical guidance

Ramsar COP10 DR 17 Draft Resolution X.17 Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment: updated scientific and technical guidance

At the species diversity level - references to ‘a population of a species’ should include wetland species and migratory species. As a reference for populations, for waterbirds appropriate biogeographical populations are established in Wetlands International’s periodically published Waterbird Population Estimates. For other taxa, population information regularly updated by IUCN’s Specialist Groups though the IUCN Species Information Service (SIS) and published in the Ramsar Technical Report series should be used. Where a site regularly supports >1% of one or more populations of waterbirds or other wetland-dependent animal species, an additional question could be: would the intended activity threaten to cause a direct or indirect loss of the international importance of these interests at the site?
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Ramsar COP10 DR 20 Draft Resolution X.20 Biogeographic regionalization in the application of the Strategic Framework for the List of Wetlands of International Importance: scientific and technical guidance

Ramsar COP10 DR 20 Draft Resolution X.20 Biogeographic regionalization in the application of the Strategic Framework for the List of Wetlands of International Importance: scientific and technical guidance

Originally intended to illustrate how the national forests of the U.S. fit within the global ecoregional scheme, an ecoregion is defined here as any large portion of the Earth’s surface over which the ecosystems have characteristics in common. There are three levels within the classification system; Domains, Divisions and Provinces. Ecoregions are based on macroclimate following the theory that macroclimates are among the most significant factors affecting the distribution of life on Earth. Temperature and rainfall along with climatic zones were used to identify the Domains and Divisions. Provinces were based on the physiognomy of the vegetation, modified by climate.
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Ramsar COP10 DR 8 Draft Resolution X.8 The Convention’s Programme on communication, education, participation and awareness (CEPA) 2009-2014

Ramsar COP10 DR 8 Draft Resolution X.8 The Convention’s Programme on communication, education, participation and awareness (CEPA) 2009-2014

amended following a decision by the Conference of the Contracting Parties about extending the timing of COPs from three to four years (DR 3). Should the proposal for a quadriennial cycle be adopted, the COP will need to determine if the period for the implementation of this CEPA programme should be adjusted to cover two four-year cycles (the period 2009-2016) or only one. There may therefore also be a need to consider including an additional paragraph in the

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Ramsar COP10 DR 23 Draft Resolution X.23 Wetlands and human health and well-being

Ramsar COP10 DR 23 Draft Resolution X.23 Wetlands and human health and well-being

21. FURTHER CALLS UPON all those responsible for wetland management to address the causes of declining human health linked with wetlands by maintaining or enhancing existing ecosystem services that can contribute to the prevention of such declines, and to ensure that any disease eradication measures in or around wetlands are undertaken in ways that do not jeopardise the maintenance of the ecological character of the wetlands and their ecosystem services;

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Ramsar COP10 DR 12 Draft Resolution X.12 Principles for partnerships between the Ramsar Convention and the business sector

Ramsar COP10 DR 12 Draft Resolution X.12 Principles for partnerships between the Ramsar Convention and the business sector

21. Since companies interested in collaboration with the Ramsar Convention might be very large, with interests and activities over a large area or throughout the world, care must be taken to monitor and evaluate, not only the ongoing partnership relationship with certain elements within the company, but also unrelated activities of the company elsewhere in the world, in order to avoid potential embarrassment to the Convention through that

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Ramsar COP10 DR 22 Draft Resolution X.22 Promoting international cooperation for the conservation of waterbird flyways

Ramsar COP10 DR 22 Draft Resolution X.22 Promoting international cooperation for the conservation of waterbird flyways

Reaffirm that, in the words of the Ramsar Convention, “waterbirds, in their seasonal migrations may transcend frontiers and so should be regarded as an international resource” and “that the conservation of wetlands and their flora and fauna can be ensured by combining farsighted national policies with coordinated international action” and accordingly urge that efforts between countries to conserve waterbird populations and their wetland habitats are extended, not only for the values that waterbirds have in sustaining human populations, but also for their own sakes;
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An Integrated Framework and guidelines for avoiding, mitigating and compensating for wetland losses

An Integrated Framework and guidelines for avoiding, mitigating and compensating for wetland losses

41. Under Article 2 of the Convention, Contracting Parties have committed themselves to designating suitable wetlands within their territories for inclusion on the List of Wetlands of International Importance. The legal status of Ramsar Sites will be different to other wetlands in a territory (Article 3). For instance, if a Party does not follow prescribed guidance in the case of a designated Ramsar Site (e.g., Article 3.2 reporting in the event of a change in ecological character), then it is in breach of the Convention itself – if a Party does not follow guidance in the case of other wetlands (Article 3.1), however, it is only breaching the spirit of a non-binding good practice principle. Consequently, under the avoid-mitigate-compensate framework there are additional commitments, and hence responses required, for Ramsar Sites concerning wetland loss and degradation. Guidance on these responses (including reporting obligations; see also section 4.8) has been adopted in Resolution X.16, A Framework for processes of detecting, reporting and responding to change in wetland ecological character (2008), included in Handbook 19, 4 th edition, 2010.
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Ramsar COP10 DOC. 15 Progress and issues concerning regional initiatives operating within the framework of the Convention

Ramsar COP10 DOC. 15 Progress and issues concerning regional initiatives operating within the framework of the Convention

19. Based on the extensive experience with the operation of the MedWet Initiative, it appears that regional initiatives, when operationally ready to do so, may take on additional tasks of coordinating and supervising more specific and restricted regional projects, in terms of thematic, geographical or time-bound focus, while also playing a long-term strategic role as a true regional forum, bringing together all relevant countries and actors in the region. These tasks were referred to as “umbrella” functions during the Standing Committee discussions. They merit to be identified in more detail with a clear view to distinguish them from the functions of the Convention Secretariat, to make sure that they are
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Resolution XI.9 An Integrated Framework and guidelines for avoiding, mitigating and compensating for wetland losses

Resolution XI.9 An Integrated Framework and guidelines for avoiding, mitigating and compensating for wetland losses

78. Where residual post-mitigation impacts remain or are expected to occur (or when Article 2.5 “urgent national interest” is invoked for a listed Ramsar Site), the next step in the sequence is to compensate for the resulting change in ecological character. Note, however, that the COP has stressed the point (in Resolutions VII.17, para. 10, and VIII.16, para. 10) that restoration or creation of wetlands cannot replace the loss or degradation of natural wetlands. This is true in relation to the ecological values of such wetlands, but in many cases it is equally true, or even more so, in relation to those cultural values that are site- specific in nature (see also Resolution IX.21, Taking into account the cultural values of wetlands).
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Avian influenza and wetlands

Avian influenza and wetlands

in 2005 recognized that, as well as the direct impacts of HPAI H5N1 on susceptible birds, public attitudes (and therefore support for wetland conservation, particularly of Ramsar sites and other wetlands of importance for waterbirds) could be negatively affected by concerns about the possible role of waterbirds in the spread of HPAI H5N1. Parties at COP9 were also greatly concerned that in many countries there was a significant lack of information and, in some countries, public misunderstanding, about important issues related to the spread of HPAI, the risks it may pose, and how to anticipate and respond to outbreaks of HPAI. Accordingly COP9 agreed Resolution IX.23 on Highly pathogenic avian influenza and its consequences for wetland and waterbird conservation and wise use. This Resolution inter alia called on the Convention’s Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP) to develop practical advice that could assist countries in responding to this serious and rapidly developing situation.
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Ramsar COP10 DR 29 Draft Resolution X.29 Clarifying the functions of agencies and related bodies implementing the Convention at the national level

Ramsar COP10 DR 29 Draft Resolution X.29 Clarifying the functions of agencies and related bodies implementing the Convention at the national level

Resolutions. Such committees can also serve as a platform for national programmes relating to CEPA and to the work of the STRP. To act in the most efficient manner, national committees should include a broad representation of wetland, water and other relevant sectors and

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Ramsar COP10 DR 15 Draft Resolution X.15 Describing the ecological character of wetlands, and data needs and formats for core inventory: harmonized scientific and technical guidance

Ramsar COP10 DR 15 Draft Resolution X.15 Describing the ecological character of wetlands, and data needs and formats for core inventory: harmonized scientific and technical guidance

23. In addition to the “Change/likely change?” column, a further refinement that Contracting Parties and wetland managers may wish to add, where appropriate and possible, is a further column identifying “Limits of acceptable change, where defined” (see also Section 5 below). This speaks to the role of the ecological character description in management planning, including monitoring, and also to determining when an Article 3.2 report of non- trivial change in ecological character would be needed. Further discussion on limits of acceptable change and trivial/non-trivial change in ecological character is provided in COP10 DOC.27.
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Ramsar COP11 DR9 , REV 1 Draft Resolution XI.9 , Rev. 1 An Integrated Framework and guidelines for avoiding, mitigating and compensating for wetland losses

Ramsar COP11 DR9 , REV 1 Draft Resolution XI.9 , Rev. 1 An Integrated Framework and guidelines for avoiding, mitigating and compensating for wetland losses

39. Under Article 2 of the Convention, Contracting Parties have committed themselves to designating suitable wetlands within their territories for inclusion on the List of Wetlands of International Importance. The legal status of Ramsar Sites will be different to other wetlands in a territory (Article 3). For instance, if a Party does not follow prescribed guidance in the case of a designated Ramsar Site (e.g., Article 3.2 reporting in the event of a change in ecological character), then it is in breach of the Convention itself – if a Party does not follow guidance in the case of other wetlands (Article 3.1), however, it is only breaching the spirit of a non-binding good practice principle. Consequently, under the avoid-mitigate-compensate framework there are additional commitments, and hence responses required, for Ramsar Sites concerning wetland loss and degradation. Guidance on these responses (including reporting obligations; see also section 4.8) has been adopted in Resolution X.16, A Framework for processes of detecting, reporting and responding to change in wetland ecological character (2008), included in Handbook 19, 4 th edition, 2010.
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Ramsar COP10 DR 9 Draft Resolution X.9 Refinements to the modus operandi of the Scientific Technical Review Panel (STRP)

Ramsar COP10 DR 9 Draft Resolution X.9 Refinements to the modus operandi of the Scientific Technical Review Panel (STRP)

7. Further Panel members shall be appointed as wetlands experts with recognized experience and expertise in aspects of wetland conservation and wise use relevant to the priority thematic work areas of the Panel. The areas of thematic expertise required for each triennium will be approved through an operative paragraph of a COP Resolution. For these members, regional balance will be sought, with appointed members based in different Ramsar countries or regions and/or from northern and southern parts of the world.
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Ramsar COP10 DR 21 Projet de résolution X.21 Orientations relatives à la lutte contre la propagation continue de l’influenza hautement pathogène H5N1

Ramsar COP10 DR 21 Projet de résolution X.21 Orientations relatives à la lutte contre la propagation continue de l’influenza hautement pathogène H5N1

4. Chez les oiseaux d’eau sauvages, les virus LPAI sont une partie naturelle de l’écosystème. Ils ont été isolés chez plus de 90 espèces d’oiseaux sauvages (Stallknecht & Shane 1988, Olsen et al. 2006; Lee 2008) et on pense qu’ils ont existé aux côtés des oiseaux sauvages depuis des millénaires dans des systèmes équilibrés. Chez leurs hôtes naturels, les virus de l’influenza aviaire infectent le système gastro-intestinal et sont rejetés par le cloaque ; ils ne provoquent généralement pas de maladie bien que certaines anomalies comportementales aient été rapportées, comme une performance amoindrie pour la migration et la recherche de nourriture chez les cygnes de Bewick Cygnus columbianus bewickii (van Gils et al. 2007). Au lieu de cela, les virus restent en stase évolutionnaire comme le montrent des taux de
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Ramsar COP10 DR 24 Draft Resolution X.24 Climate change and wetlands

Ramsar COP10 DR 24 Draft Resolution X.24 Climate change and wetlands

21. RECALLING that Objective 4.1 of the Strategic Framework and guidelines for the future development of the List of Wetlands of International Importance is “to use Ramsar sites as baseline and reference areas for national, supranational/regional, and international environmental monitoring to detect trends in the loss of biological diversity, climate change, and the processes of desertification”, but CONCERNED that mechanisms may not be in place for reporting such trend assessments, and ALSO CONCERNED that adequate wetland inventory and assessment information at regional and global scales is not available to support and interpret such trend assessments; and
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